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A Rapoport

Bio: A Rapoport is an academic researcher from Toronto Western Hospital. The author has contributed to research in topics: Calcification & Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 15 publications receiving 934 citations.

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TL;DR: Total chromogen, true, and AutoAnalyzer methods of measuring serum and urine creatinine by the Jaffe reaction were investigated and their precision, recovery, and sample stability determined.
Abstract: Total chromogen, true, and AutoAnalyzer methods of measuring serum and urine creatinine by the Jaffe reaction were investigated. Some factors influencing this reaction were examined. These included wavelength, blank, linearity, and conditions of color development. Modifications of the three methods were made and their precision, recovery, and sample stability determined. The interference of ketones and glucose were measured. Finally, the values obtained by the three methods on the same samples of serum and urine were compared statistically.

393 citations

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TL;DR: Observations suggest that in end-stage renal disease hypermagnesemia may retard the development of arterial calcifications in patients being treated by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

174 citations

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TL;DR: A gene presenting as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia can be expressed as hyperCalcemia that is intermittent and very mild in heterozygotes and such a gene can cause neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism in homozygotes.

128 citations

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TL;DR: It is concluded that flow rate of 4 liters/hr with a 2-liter exchange will give maximum efficiency in long-term peritoneal dialysis, since patients could not tolerate a flow rates of 6 liter/hr.

46 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
Gc Viberti1, R. J. Jarrett1, U. Mahmud1, R. D. Hill1, A. Argyropoulos1, Harry Keen1 
TL;DR: Elevated levels of microalbuminuria strongly predict the development of clinical diabetic nephropathy, and these levels of AER are potentially reversible, and their detection and treatment may prevent diabetic renal disease.

1,665 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is an essential relation between poverty and fluorosis as malnutrition is found to play an aggressive role in its severity, as the lack of access to clean water denies the most essential of all rights, the right to life.
Abstract: ‘Water is life,’ so central to human life, yet over one billion people across the world have no access to safe drinking water. Of late, there has been increasing global attention focused on resolving water quality problems especially in developing countries, as the lack of access to clean water denies the most essential of all rights, the right to life. The latest estimates suggest that around 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, are under the dreadful fate of fluorosis. India and China, the two most populous countries of the world, are the worst affected. India is plagued with numerous water quality problems due to prolific contaminants mainly of geogenic origin and fluoride stands first among them. The weathering of primary rocks and leaching of fluoride-containing minerals in soils yield fluoride rich groundwater in India which is generally associated with low calcium content and high bicarbonate ions. The unfettered ground water tapping exacerbates the failure of drinking water so...

1,116 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
31 Dec 1993-Cell
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that mutations in the human Ca(2+)-sensing receptor gene cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT), two inherited conditions characterized by altered calcium homeostasis.

997 citations

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TL;DR: It is concluded that the determination of the protein/creatinine ratio in single urine samples obtained during normal daylight activity, when properly interpreted by taking into consideration the effect of different rates of creatinine excretion, can replace the 24-hour urine collection in the clinical quantitation of proteinuria.
Abstract: Quantitation of urinary protein excretion is used extensively for diagnostic and prognostic purposes and to assess the effects of therapy. The method most commonly used to measure urinary protein relies on 24-hour urine collections, which are time consuming, cumbersome, and often inaccurate. We reasoned that the urinary protein/creatinine ratio in a single voided urine sample should correlate well with the quantity of protein in timed urine collections. In a study of 46 specimens we found an excellent correlation between the protein content of a 24-hour urine collection and the protein/creatinine ratio in a single urine sample. The best correlation was found when samples were collected after the first voided morning specimen and before bedtime. We conclude that the determination of the protein/creatinine ratio in single urine samples obtained during normal daylight activity, when properly interpreted by taking into consideration the effect of different rates of creatinine excretion, can replace the 24-hour urine collection in the clinical quantitation of proteinuria. In the presence of stable renal function, a protein/creatinine ratio of more than 3.5 (mg/mg) can be taken to represent "nephrotic-range" proteinuria, and a ratio of less than 0.2 is within normal limits.

739 citations

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TL;DR: About three fourths of all kidney stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and ten to 20 percent of stones contain struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) produced by a urinary tract infection with bacteria that express the enzyme urease.
Abstract: ABOUT three fourths of all kidney stones are composed of calcium oxalate1; most calcium oxalate stones also contain a small amount of hydroxyapatite, and 10 to 12 percent contain some uric acid.2 Ten to 20 percent of stones contain struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) produced by a urinary tract infection with bacteria that express the enzyme urease.3 Five percent of stones are pure uric acid, 5 percent contain more than 50 percent hydroxyapatite or calcium monohydrogen phosphate (brushite), and less than 1 percent are composed of cystine. Whereas most calcium oxalate stones are less than 2 cm in diameter, struvite, . . .

641 citations