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Aaron M. Hagler

Bio: Aaron M. Hagler is an academic researcher from Troy University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Historiography & Narrative. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 17 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Aaron M. Hagler1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the literary-narrative strategies Ibn Kathīr employs to alter the narrative so as to counteract the implications of the pro-ʿAlīd versions of the story he found in his sources, especially al-Ṭabarī's Taʾrīkh al-Rusul wa-l-mulūk.
Abstract: Abstract In the era of the “Sunnī Revival” and the couple of centuries following, scholars engaged in a large historiographical project aimed at rehabilitating the reputation of the Umayyad dynasty and Syria’s role in the early Islamic narrative. One of Ibn Kathīr’s historiographical missions in his history Kitāb al-Bidāya wa-l-nihāya was specifically the defense of the Companions of the Prophet. As such, the narrative of ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib required some manipulation to answer Shīʿī narratives that cast some of the most important Companions (especially those associated with the Umayyads and Syria) in a rebellious light. This article explores the literary-narrative strategies Ibn Kathīr employs to alter the narrative so as to counteract the implications of the pro-ʿAlīd versions of the story he found in his sources, especially al-Ṭabarī’s Taʾrīkh al-Rusul wa-l-mulūk.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Aaron M. Hagler1
17 May 2018
TL;DR: In this article, an experimental methodology of viewing medieval Arabic authors through the lens of stage actor performance theory is presented. But the authors do not consider the role of the actor in their performances.
Abstract: This paper employs and describes an experimental methodology of viewing medieval Arabic authors through the lens of stage actor performance theory. In particular, it argues that semi-canonical writings, such as al-Ṭabarī’s History of the Prophets and Kings, become the “script” that later authors, such as Ibn al-Athīr and Ibn Kathīr “perform” as actors. This methodology is novel, and argues that by examining the changes authors made to narratives presented in earlier Arabic texts, we can draw important conclusions about the authors’ opinions of the relative importance of narrative elements, the authors’ literary-narrative strategies for endowing memories with meaning, and establish each author's "super-objective" (his primary thematic or narrative concerns).

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Aaron M. Hagler1
07 May 2018-Arabica
TL;DR: The historical chronicle al-Karmel (The Complete History of Islam) of Ibn al-Aṯīr al-azarī (555/1160-630/1233) as mentioned in this paper treats conservatively the existing corpus of narratives of the fitna, the first Muslim civil war (36/656-41/661).
Abstract: The historical chronicle al-Kāmil fī l-ta⁠ʾrīḫ ( The Complete History ) of Ibn al-Aṯīr al-Ǧazarī (555/1160-630/1233) treats conservatively the existing corpus of narratives of the fitna , the first Muslim civil war (36/656-41/661). Ibn al-Aṯīr alters his main source’s accounts of troublesome moments, usually through omission, to present a universal history that serves to rehabilitate the reputation of the Umayyads without criticizing the partisans of ʿAlī. While this approach may be understood as remarkable scholarly detachment from perhaps the most contentious episode of the early Islamic narrative, in fact this narrative strategy is carefully calculated to present a past that can serve as an example for the future: one in which the disagreements that had fractured the umma were surmountable, and its unity was recoverable. Such changes, while small, had a large qualitative impact due to the narrative centrality of the fitna within the wider early Islamic narrative.La chronique historique d’Ibn al-Aṯīr al-Ǧazarī (555/1160-630/1233), intitulee al-Kāmil fī l-ta⁠ʾrīḫ ( L’histoire complete ) traite avec prudence le corpus des recits de la fitna , premiere guerre civile des musulmans (36/656-41/661). Ibn al-Aṯīr modifie les recits des moments genants de sa source principale, generalement par le biais d’omissions, afin de presenter une histoire universelle qui rehabilite la reputation des Omeyyades, sans pour autant critiquer les partisans de ʿAlī. Bien que cette approche puisse etre interpretee comme un remarquable detachement de la part d’un savant a l’egard de l’episode le plus litigieux de l’histoire des debuts de l’islam, cette strategie narrative est soigneusement calculee pour faire du passe un exemple pour l’avenir. Un futur dans lequel les desaccords qui avaient fracture la communaute sont surmontables, et l’unite possible. Bien que minimes, de telles de modifications narratives ont un large impact, en raison de la centralite de la fitna dans le recit plus general des premiers temps de l’Islam.This article is in English.

1 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The introduction to Islamic Theology and Law is given in this article, with a discussion of the relationship between Islamology and law, and its application in the field of Islamology.
Abstract: The description for this book, Introduction to Islamic Theology and Law, will be forthcoming.

108 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: El-Hibri et al. as mentioned in this paper discuss parable and politics in early Islamic history: the Rashidun caliphs, by Tayeb El-hibri, New York, Columbia University Press, 2010, xvi + 1.471 pp., $60.00 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-231-15082-8
Abstract: Parable and politics in early Islamic history: the Rashidun caliphs, by Tayeb El-Hibri, New York, Columbia University Press, 2010, xvi + 471 pp., $60.00 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-231-15082-8 In a hand...

19 citations

Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this paper, a 10-century jurist has written a key text in Islamic law, which is still widely referred to by scholars, but only now translated into English, called the Qur'an.
Abstract: Written by a 10-century jurist, this is a key text in Islamic law, still widely referred to by scholars, but only now translated into English.

11 citations