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Abebaw Andarge Gedefaw

Bio: Abebaw Andarge Gedefaw is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Land-use planning & Land cover. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 25 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
12 Oct 2019-Land
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the determinants influencing the willingness of landholder farmers to participate in voluntary land consolidation processes and found that land consolidation is a proper tool to solve inefficiencies in agricultural production, as it enables consolidating plots based on the consent of landholders.
Abstract: In many African countries and especially in the highlands of Ethiopia—the investigation site of this paper—agricultural land is highly fragmented. Small and scattered parcels impede a necessary increase in agricultural efficiency. Land consolidation is a proper tool to solve inefficiencies in agricultural production, as it enables consolidating plots based on the consent of landholders. Its major benefits are that individual farms get larger, more compact, contiguous parcels, resulting in lower cultivation efforts. This paper investigates the determinants influencing the willingness of landholder farmers to participate in voluntary land consolidation processes. The study was conducted in Gozamin District, Amhara Region, Ethiopia. The study was mainly based on survey data collected from 343 randomly selected landholder farmers. In addition, structured interviews and focus group discussions with farmers were held. The collected data were analyzed quantitatively mainly by using a logistic regression model and qualitatively by using focus group discussions and expert panels. According to the results, landholder farmers are predominantly willing to participate in voluntary land consolidation (66.8%), while a substantive fraction of farmers express unease with voluntary land consolidation. The study highlighted the following four determinants to be significant in influencing the willingness of farmers for voluntary land consolidation: (1) the exchange should preferably happen with parcels of neighbors, (2) land consolidation should lead to better arranged parcels, (3) nearness of plots to the farmstead, and (4) an expected improvement in productivity. Interestingly, the majority of farmers believes that land consolidation could reduce land use conflicts. The study provides evidence that policymakers should consider these socio-economic, legal, cultural, infrastructural, and land-related factors when designing and implementing voluntary land consolidation policies and programs.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used the drivers, pressures, state, impact, responses (DPSIR) framework to quantify the land cover change and identify its major determinants by using the Satellite images of Landsat 5 (1986), Landsat 7 (2003), and Sentinel-2 (2018) and a supervised image classification methodology.
Abstract: Land cover patterns in sub-Saharan Africa are rapidly changing. This study aims to quantify the land cover change and to identify its major determinants by using the Drivers, Pressures, State, Impact, Responses (DPSIR) framework in the Ethiopian Gozamin District over a period of 32 years (1986 to 2018). Satellite images of Landsat 5 (1986), Landsat 7 (2003), and Sentinel-2 (2018) and a supervised image classification methodology were used to assess the dynamics of land cover change. Land cover maps of the three dates, focus group discussions (FGDs), interviews, and farmers’ lived experiences through a household survey were applied to identify the factors for changes based on the DPSIR framework. Results of the investigations revealed that during the last three decades the study area has undergone an extensive land cover change, primarily a shift from cropland and grassland into forests and built-up areas. Thus, quantitative land cover change detection between 1986 and 2018 revealed that cropland, grassland, and bare areas declined by 10.53%, 5.7%, and 2.49%. Forest, built-up, shrub/scattered vegetation, and water bodies expanded by 13.47%, 4.02%, 0.98%, and 0.25%. Household surveys and focus group discussions (FGDs) identified the population growth, the rural land tenure system, the overuse of land, the climate change, and the scarcity of grazing land as drivers of these land cover changes. Major impacts were rural to urban migration, population size change, scarcity of land, and decline in land productivity. The outputs from this study could be used to assure sustainability in resource utilization, proper land use planning, and proper decision-making by the concerned government authorities.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Oct 2020-Land
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the effect of land certification on tenure security, land investment, crop productivity and land dispute in Gozamin District, Ethiopia and found that most farm households (56%) feel that their land use rights are secure after the certification process.
Abstract: Economic theory notes tenure security is a critical factor in agricultural investment and productivity. Therefore, several African countries’ development initiatives enabled land titling to enhance tenure security. This paper examines the effect of land certification on tenure security, land investment, crop productivity and land dispute in Gozamin District, Ethiopia. In addition, the impact of land certification on farm households’ perceptions and confidence in land tenure and land use rights is investigated. Face-to-face interviews with 343 randomly selected farm households, group discussions and expert panels are the sources of primary data. Quantitative data are analyzed using various statistical tools and complemented by qualitative data. According to the results, most farm households (56%) feel that their land use rights are secure after the certification process. Only 17% fear that the government at any time could take their land use rights. The majority of farm households (71.7%) identified a reduction of disputes after certification and land management practices improved from 70.3% before certification to 90.1% after certification. As key factors for the increase of terracing and the application of manure, the study determined total farm size, the average distance from farm to homestead, perception of degradation, access to credit, training to land resource management, fear about land take-over by the government and total livestock holdings. Crop productivity improved significantly after land certification. The results should encourage policy makers to minimize the sources of insecurity, such as frustrations of future land redistribution and land taking without proper land compensation. Land certification is the right tool for creating tenure security, enhancing farmers’ confidence in their land rights and—supported by a proper land use planning system—improving land-related investments and crop productivity.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors evaluated the conventional methods (existing and proposed UGS) against remote sensing and GIS-based, and to identify, quantify and allocate the proper suitable site for UGS development.
Abstract: Abstract Urban green space (UGS) serves as a lung for city dwellers to breathe and is critical for fostering the sustainable growth of urban ecology and improving residents’ quality of life. Debre Markos City (DMC) lacks natural recreational areas such as lakes and artificial green spaces. A notable UGS study utilizing multiple contributing factors integrated with remote sensing and GIS has a significant advantage in making residents more comfortable. This study, therefore, aimed to assess the conventional methods (existing and proposed UGS) against remote sensing and GIS-based, and to identify, quantify and allocate the proper suitable site for UGS development.. Hence, ten UGS influencing factors were selected. Each criterion was analyzed with the use of its proper algorithm. Multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) analysis integrated with Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method and Remote Sensing and GIS were applied. The weighted sum overlay analysis method of spatial analysis was implemented based on the criteria weight of each factor. A 90.6% and 0.8855 accuracy assessment and kappa coefficient were recorded for land use/land cover classification, respectively. The value of the consistency ratio was 0.043, which is < 1 and acceptable. Results revealed that 13.12% (2201 ha), 25.47% (4271.7 ha), 30.89% (5180.8 ha), 22.49% (3772.7 ha), and 8.2% (1345.8 ha) of the total area coverage had very high , highly , moderately , poorly and unsuitable for UGS development activity at DMC, respectively. In this study, a resident can access UGS with less than 1 km radius distance, closer to the national standard of Ethiopia (i.e. 500 m). However, in the existing UGS, a person is forced to walk or travel more than 8.4 km to get the service. In conclusion, remote sensing and GIS can make life easy to access UGS in the study area with minimum distance, cost, and a short period. It is recommended that policymakers, planners, and executive bodies in Ethiopia consider the future urban demand of dwellers with proper studies earlier to establish other urban infrastructures.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
31 May 2023-Land
TL;DR: In this article , the authors investigated the contribution of land registration on the perceived tenure security of farmers, farmer confidence, women and marginalized groups, and sustainable land management practice after receiving a land holding certificate in the dryland areas of East Gojjam Zone, Ethiopia.
Abstract: Land registration programs on a large scale aimed at strengthening the land rights of farm households in Ethiopia have been executed in different degrees across different regions since 1998. This study investigates the contribution of land registration on the perceived tenure security of farmers, farmer confidence, women and marginalized groups, and sustainable land-management practice after receiving a land holding certificate in the dryland areas of East Gojjam Zone, Ethiopia. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 385 households selected by using stratified random sampling techniques. Furthermore, focus group discussions and key informants are primary data sources. According to an investigation of qualitative and quantitative data, 163 households have a mean of 0.40 ha of agricultural land on steep slope areas, and approximately 26% of households are afraid of land redistribution and farm loss in the next five years. Moreover, 22% of households fear the government taking their farm plot at any time. Respondents, on the other hand, believe that land registration has reduced the landlessness of women, the disabled, and the poorest of the poor while increasing the landlessness of youths. After land registration, household participation in land-management practices increased by 15%. Despite this, the difference in the mean of major crop yields per household is insignificant, except for wheat, which decreased significantly at the p < 0.1 level. The study determined household head age, household size, land management training and advice, livestock holdings, and the mean distance from farm to settlement as influential factors for increasing construction of water-harvesting systems. Land registration, in general, enhances land tenure security, land-management practice, and land rights of women and marginalized groups of societies, but did not improve crop productivity. The findings should persuade policymakers to address potential sources of insecurity, such as future land redistribution issues.

Cited by
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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The remote sensing and image interpretation is universally compatible with any devices to read and is available in the digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can get it instantly.
Abstract: Thank you very much for downloading remote sensing and image interpretation. As you may know, people have look hundreds times for their favorite novels like this remote sensing and image interpretation, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some malicious virus inside their computer. remote sensing and image interpretation is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can get it instantly. Our book servers spans in multiple countries, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the remote sensing and image interpretation is universally compatible with any devices to read.

1,802 citations

01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The demand for land consolidation arises from a similar source in all countries: the need for readjusting unfavourable land division and promoting the appropriate use of the real property without changing the status of ownership as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Rural development by land consolidation is used in several countries in the Continent of Europe. At the moment, land consolidation projects are executed broadly in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, as well as in Finland, Norway and Sweden. The demand for land consolidation arises from a similar source in all countries: the need for readjusting unfavourable land division and promoting the appropriate use of the real property without changing the status of ownership.

83 citations

Posted Content
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: This paper found that the recent land redistribution in Amhara has had a positive impact on land productivity, by increasing access to land of farmers who are more interested or able to use purchased inputs such as fertilizer and improved seeds.
Abstract: The increasing problem of landlessness in Ethiopia has put pressure on regional governments to redistribute land. In 1997 and 1998, a major land redistribution was undertaken in the Amhara region, reducing landlessness where implemented. While the impacts of such redistributions have been hotly debated, little empirical evidence exists concerning the actual impacts of this redistribution. We find that the recent land redistribution in Amhara has had a positive impact on land productivity, by increasing access to land of farmers who are more interested or able to use purchased inputs such as fertilizer and improved seeds. Our results, however, do not show much effect of the recent land redistribution or expectations of future redistribution on land improvement and management. Thus, to the extent that investment in land improvement are necessary for conservation purposes, it appears that the policy change to stop redistributions is unlikely to have a substantial impact on reducing land degradation in this region of Ethiopia.

68 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined how contemporary land consolidation activities in Sub-Saharan Africa contribute to the achievement of the SDGs, specifically ending poverty, ending hunger, and developing sustainable cities and settlements through land tenure security, food security, and rural development initiatives at country level.

25 citations