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Aiden Yeh

Bio: Aiden Yeh is an academic researcher from Wenzao Ursuline University of Languages. The author has contributed to research in topics: Linguistics & Vietnamese. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 6 publications receiving 30 citations. Previous affiliations of Aiden Yeh include National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology & University of Languages and International Studies.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article discussed how poetry can be used as a topic of discussion and the basis for a task-based project for university students who have had little exposure to American poetry, and the use of multimedia and online video as tools in the course of this project is also discussed and attention is likewise given to student feedback on a questionnaire administered online.
Abstract: Task-based classroom work in Taiwan that uses a mix of traditional teaching, multimedia, and online video. In this paper, I discuss how poetry can be used as a topic of discussion and the basis for a task-based project for university students who have had little exposure to American poetry. The use of multimedia and online video as tools in the course of this project is also discussed and attention is likewise given to student feedback on a questionnaire administered online. Students' critical reflections and subjective analyses of their performances and their feelings toward the project reveal positive results, allowing me to conclude that the integration of poetry into language-teaching work, if delivered effectively, can hone students' thinking, reading, listening, writing, speaking and analytical skills. It is not only the amount of hard work that matters, but how far the imagination is stretched.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a discussion of the impact of parental demand on the terms of employment of imported native-speaking and local non-native-speaking teachers in private language schools is presented.
Abstract: A discussion of the impact of parental demand on the terms of employment of imported native-speaking and local non-native-speaking teachers in private language schools As more and more parents realize the importance of learning the language at an early stage, the teaching of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) to young learners has become a lucrative adventure for Taiwanese entrepreneurs Taiwanese students and parents alike represent a stable and growing market, at least for now The demand for both Native Speaking (NS) and Non-Native Speaking (NNS) teachers is also on the rise and can certainly be attributed to the flourishing EFL industry in Taiwan However, there is a distinctively huge difference in the pay and reward policies and practices for the two kinds of teacher This article touches on relatively sensitive issues concerning NS/NNS as EFL teachers and as members of staff

11 citations

01 Jun 2019
TL;DR: The authors discusses the problems concerning the commodification of English language teaching in the Philippines, that is, cost factors, learner expectations and satisfaction on the courses and quality of teaching, Filipino teachers' (FTs) pronunciation and the Philippine English accent vis-a-vis the native speaker norms, and their ramifications on pedagogy and other users of wider sociolinguistic significance.
Abstract: As the third largest nation of English speakers, the Philippines has become a popular destination for English language learning, especially for people in South East Asia. Yet, however you dress up popularity, we have to look beyond the headlines and see what kind of narrative is being constructed. A closer examination of detailed empirical evidence from published research studies highlights issues that are often glossed over in newspaper headlines. This paper discusses the problems concerning the commodification of English language teaching in the Philippines, that is, cost factors, learner expectations and satisfaction on the courses and quality of teaching, Filipino teachers’ (FTs) pronunciation and the Philippine English (PhE) accent vis-a-vis the native speaker norms, and their ramifications on pedagogy and other users of wider sociolinguistic significance. Recommendations for stakeholders will be provided.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Jun 2020
TL;DR: In this article, a corpus-based critical discourse analysis is used to analyze sub-elements of politeness including the degree of imposition, terms of address, request-giving strategy and lexicon-syntactic modifier.
Abstract: This exploratory study investigates politeness strategies employed by Vietnamese EFL learners when writing English request emails sent to foreign and Vietnamese professors and school staff. A corpus-based critical discourse analysis is used to analyze sub-elements of politeness including the degree of imposition, terms of address, request-giving strategy and lexicon-syntactic modifier. The results support the assumption that Vietnamese language pragmatic knowledge is deeply ingrained and has tremendous influence on students’ L2 email writing skills. The study also reveals that Vietnamese students applied a high level of imposition with formal term of address and salutation, directness strategies with the overuse of “please” and other hedges. While gender is not a determining factor, the inflexible adoption of fixed phrases and syntactic-lexical devices were attributed to the lack of sociopragmatic competence. Thus, apart from linguistic knowledge, the role of cultural awareness and socio-pragmatic knowledge should be highlighted in communicative English learning and teaching.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Mar 2020
TL;DR: In this article, a content analysis designed to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate a cross-culturally written textbook used for secondary EFL learners in Vietnamese context was performed, which revealed a variety of speech acts introduced in the contents but also highlighted their problematic distribution and sequence.
Abstract: For non-native English learners to successfully manage authentic intercultural and international communication, their pragmatic competence should be considered as fundamental as their linguistic capacity (Bachman, 1990). As the foundation for developing language skills, English textbooks provide EFL learners with preliminary exposure to real-life situated pragmatic interactions. However, there is limited empirical research on the authenticity and appropriateness of the pragmatic representations in Vietnamese EFL textbooks at present. To fill in the gap, this paper provides a content analysis designed to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate a cross-culturally written textbook used for secondary EFL learners in Vietnamese context. It aimed to examine (1) types and distribution of speech acts the textbook covered, (2) meta-pragmatic information accompanying the linguistic realizations of those speech acts, and (3) appropriateness and authenticity of such pragmatic representations in relation to Vietnamese social context. The results revealed a variety of speech acts introduced in the contents but also highlighted their problematic distribution and sequence. Despite their occurrences, the linguistic patterns to achieve the speech acts were limited and accompanied by decontextualized and oversimplified meta-pragmatic information. From a Vietnamese cultural perspective, the attempts to reflect Vietnamese conventions of daily communication were spotted but the inappropriateness of the linguistic choices in the real social interactions was also indisputable. Therefore, some pedagogical implications were suggested to further improve the EFL textbook, reflecting the authentic social encounters rather than disseminating the textbook writers’ prescribed fictitious responses.

3 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: The Future of Drylands (FOD) conference as mentioned in this paper is an international scientific conference dedicated to science, education, culture and communication in arid and semi-arid zones.
Abstract: On behalf of Mr. Koichiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO, it is my great pleasure to welcome you all to this international scientific conference. Drylands are often considered fragile ecosystems, yet they have a remarkable resilience to stress. They are home to unique and well-adapted plant and animal species that we need to conserve. Some of the world’s greatest cultures and belief systems have originated in drylands. On the other hand, desertification and land degradation in drylands often result in poverty and cause environmental refugees to abandon their homes. These problems can only be addressed in a holistic manner, based on sound scientific research and findings. Solutions to the problems of dryland degradation need to be communicated as widely as possible through education at all levels. These are many reasons why UNESCO – within its mandate of science, education, culture and communication – took the intiative to organize this conference. And we are glad that so many partners have responded to our call. UNESCO considers this conference as its main contribution to the observance of the International Year of Deserts and Desertification in 2006. We have deliberately chosen the title ‘The Future of Drylands’ as we feel it is time to redefine our priorities for science, education and governance in the drylands based on 50 years of scientific research in arid and semi-arid zones. In fact UNESCO has one of the longest traditions, within the UN system, of addressing dryland problems from an interdisciplinary, scientific point of view. In 1955, the ‘International Arid Land Meetings’ were held in Socorro, New Mexico (USA). They were organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), sponsored by UNESCO and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. One important output of the International Arid Land Meetings was a book entitled The Future of Drylands, edited by Gilbert F. White and published in

1,199 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 1927

334 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the author goes beyond this verbal derivation to a closer scrutiny of the essential connections of the many masks each of us wears, including names, appraisals, memberships, history, prestige, subtle and overt changes in character, and constant mutual modifications incident to social intercourse.
Abstract: Who am I, and how do I know? I am different in talking to different people; I adapt my mask to the expectations I see mirrored in them. Do they change, too? Doctors, no less than others, need to be reminded that the word person, the implications of which we consider so essential to modern medical practice, is derived from a word meaning a mask, such as players wore. The author of this stimulating book goes beyond this verbal derivation to a closer scrutiny of the essential connections of the many masks each of us wears. Names, appraisals, memberships, history, prestige, subtle and overt changes in character, and the constant mutual modifications incident to social intercourse are discussed. Strangely, the author omits all mention of the most typical and vivid American identity confusion—that of the “American” Indians. Sociology, argues the author persuasively, no less than psychology, can contribute to the

303 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Amos Paran1
TL;DR: This article surveys the existing research, as well as evidence from practitioners about approaches that are used and the range of works and authors that are taught in the classroom, and the reactions that learners have to incorporating literature in their language lessons.
Abstract: The resurgence in the use of literature in language teaching has been accompanied by an increasing number of research articles in this area. Research (in a number of second languages) has looked at the type of interactions and the type of language that arise from classroom discussions about literature, as well as at the views of teachers and learners. Importantly, the reactions that learners have to incorporating literature in their language lessons are linked to the type of approach and type of task that are used in the classroom. The paper surveys the existing research, as well as evidence from practitioners about approaches that are used and the range of works and authors that are taught.

186 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors report policies and practices that invite native-speaking English teachers to Asian countries, including China and Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea, with emphasis on public education sectors.
Abstract: ENGLISH is the most commonly used language in the world. As it has become the language that provides access to higher education and job opportunities, and has become almost exclusively the language of diplomatic discussion and business negotiation (cf. English APEC Strategic Plan, 2004), there has been a growing interest in hiring native-speaking English Teachers (NSETs) in Asian countries. The aim of this paper is to report policies and practices that invite NSETs to Asian countries, including China and Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea, with emphasis on public education sectors. Through surveying both similar policies and the implementation of policies in several Asian countries, we seek to find practical suggestions for hiring NSETs. We survey policy goals, recruitment procedures, and the qualifications of NSETs. The analysis will be based on the premise that ‘language planning cannot be understood without reference to its social contexts’ (Cooper, 1989:3).

95 citations