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Author

Akram Khater

Other affiliations: Smith College
Bio: Akram Khater is an academic researcher from North Carolina State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Middle East & Rite. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 18 publications receiving 548 citations. Previous affiliations of Akram Khater include Smith College.
Topics: Middle East, Rite, Diaspora, Faith, Christianity

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon as mentioned in this paper is a book about the culture of sectarianism in Ottoman Lebanon.
Abstract: (2001). The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon. History: Reviews of New Books: Vol. 29, No. 3, pp. 129-129.

210 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a list of illustrators who have contributed to the making of a middle class, including: A Departure from the Ordinary 2. Factory Girls 3. Emigration 4. The Mahjar 5. Back to the Mountain 6. A Woman's Boundaries 7.
Abstract: List of Illustrations Acknowledgments 1. A Departure from the Ordinary 2. Factory Girls 3. Emigration 4. The Mahjar 5. Back to the Mountain 6. A Woman's Boundaries 7. Epilogue: The Making of a Middle Class. Notes Bibliography Index

139 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the period between 1798 and 1914 and examine how European imperialists and Egyptian nationalists approached the history of Egyptian antiquity and how they constructed it for elite or public consumption through museums and books.
Abstract: Many tourists marvel at Egypt’s ancient historical wealth but are oblivious to the existence of Egyptians, and many of the latter feel little it‘ any connection to an alienized, Pharaonic past. It is the history of these modem-day disjunctions that Donald Malcolm Reid seeks 10 comprehend and rectify in his book Whow Phanrohs? By focusing on the period between 1798 and 1914, Reid looks at how European imperialists and Egyptian nationalists approached the history of Egyptian antiquity and how they constructed it for elite or public consumption through museums and book\\. The book (in two parts and eight chapters) is based o n extensive research into European and Arabic sources that have not been previously used. I t traces the growth in European interest in E.,gyptian archaeology from Champollion to Mariette and Maspero. Reid deftly and engagingly chronicles the race among various curiitors and art collectors to possess Egyptian artifacts, ignoring all the while the rights of modem Egyptians-all under the pretext that the latter were not civilized enough to appreciate their past. Subsequently, he traces the cultural politics surrounding the establishment of various museums in Egypt and links this to the overall struggle between emerging nationalist sentiments in Egypt and imperial rule and designs for the country. From this perspective, he explores the tense and difficult relation between a science claiming objectivity and universality (archaeology) and the subjective politics of nationalism and imperialism. But what is perhaps most appealing about the book is that Reid writes Egyptians back into the history of Egyptian archaeology. In particular, he elucidates how Egyptian intellectuals, such as al-Tahtawi, politicians, such as Khedive Isma’il, and archaeologists, such as Ahmad Kamal, are an integral part of that history. He expands the history of Egyptian museums to encompass not only Pharaonic archaeology but also the Greco-Roman, Coptic, and Islamic eras. In expanding our scope in this manner, Reid contextualizes and reevaluates the extent of European archaeological accomplishments vis-h-vis those of their Egyptian counterparts. In all these ways, Reid bypasses all previous histories of Egyptian museums and archaeology and introduces new ideas and knowledge about those narratives. That he does so in a lucid narrative form makes Who.se Phuraohs? accessible for an educated general audience. However, it would most surely be of great use to historians and graduate students of Egyptian history.

71 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper analyzed the dialectic relation between gender, class, and the state during a particularly explosive period of recent Egyptian history through an in-depth examination of women's organized attempts at political participation within the larger context of Egyptian national politics.
Abstract: This article attempts to analyze the dialectic relation between gender, class, and the state during a particularly explosive period of recent Egyptian history through an in-depth examination of women's organized attempts at political participation within the larger context of Egyptian national politics. Most contemporary scholarship on the women's movement in Egypt associate its beginnings with the 1919 Revolution, assumes its demise in the late 1930s and overlooks the post World War II period in the analysis of its authenticity and relevance. Yet it is precisely during this period (1945–1959) that the women's movement comes of age in the sense that it experiences a diversification in ideology, tactics, and goals and in that it begins to transcend its elitist origins and membership. Moreover, it is in this period that the women's movement consciously shifts away from being dominated by a socially oriented, mostly philanthropic organization (The Egyptian Feminist Union) to a diversified political movement (including several organizations) that attempt to link the women's struggle to other political and social concerns such as the nationalist movement and class struggle.

37 citations

Book
09 Apr 2003

28 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 1982
Abstract: Introduction 1. Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle 2. Images of Relationship 3. Concepts of Self and Morality 4. Crisis and Transition 5. Women's Rights and Women's Judgment 6. Visions of Maturity References Index of Study Participants General Index

7,539 citations

01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: A Different Mirror as mentioned in this paper is a retelling of America's history, a powerful larger narrative of the many different peoples who together compose the United States of America, with the stories and voices of people previously left out of the historical canon.
Abstract: "A Different Mirror" is a dramatic new retelling of our nation's history, a powerful larger narrative of the many different peoples who together compose the United States of America. In a lively account filled with the stories and voices of people previously left out of the historical canon, Ronald Takaki offers a fresh perspective - a "re-visioning" - of our nation's past.

1,025 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Thematiche [38].
Abstract: accademiche [38]. Ada [45]. Adrian [45]. African [56]. Age [39, 49, 61]. Al [23]. Al-Rawi [23]. Aldous [68]. Alex [15]. Allure [46]. America [60, 66]. American [49, 69, 61, 52]. ancienne [25]. Andreas [28]. Angela [42]. Animals [16]. Ann [26]. Anna [19, 47]. Annotated [46]. Annotations [28]. Anti [37]. Anti-Copernican [37]. Antibiotic [64]. Anxiety [51]. Apocalyptic [61]. Archaeology [26]. Ark [36]. Artisan [32]. Asylum [48]. Atri [54]. Audra [65]. Australia [41]. Authorship [15]. Axelle [29].

978 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors show that migrations to northern and southeastern Asia were comparable in size and demographic impact to the transatlantic flows and followed similar cycles of growth and contraction, and a global perspective suggests ways in which that economy extended beyond direct European intervention.
Abstract: European migrations to the Americas and Australia have often been noted as an important part of world history, but movements to the frontiers, factories, and cities of Asia and Africa have largely been overlooked. This paper will show that migrations to northern and southeastern Asia were comparable in size and demographic impact to the transatlantic flows and followed similar cycles of growth and contraction. These migrations were all part of an expanding world economy, and a global perspective suggests ways in which that economy extended beyond direct European intervention. A global perspective also compels us to extend the traditional ending point for the era of mass migration from 1914 to 1930, and to be more aware of how political intervention has shaped the world into different migration systems and led scholars to wrongly assume that these systems reflect categorically different kinds of migration.

320 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the complexity of rural in-migration processes, through a focus on rural return migration, has been highlighted, and it is argued that return migrants draw on classic counterurbanisation discourses in their narratives of return, but that these are interwoven with notions of family/kinship.

184 citations