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Author

Alan Galey

Other affiliations: Carleton University
Bio: Alan Galey is an academic researcher from University of Toronto. The author has contributed to research in topics: Digital media & Reading (process). The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 27 publications receiving 304 citations. Previous affiliations of Alan Galey include Carleton University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that, just as an edition of a book can be a means of reifying a theory about how books should be edited, so can the creation of an experimental digital prototype be understood as conveying an argument about designing interfaces.
Abstract: In this article, we argue that, just as an edition of a book can be a means of reifying a theory about how books should be edited, so can the creation of an experimental digital prototype be understood as conveying an argument about designing interfaces. Building on this premise, we explore theoretical affinities shared by recent design and book history scholarship, and connect those theories to the emerging practice of peer-reviewing digital objects in scholarly contexts. We suggest a checklist for subjecting prototypes directly to peer review: • Is the argument reified by the prototype contestable, defensible, and substantive? • Does the prototype have a recognizable position in the context of similar work, either in terms of concept or affordances? • Is the prototype part of a series of prototypes with an identifiable trajectory? • Does the prototype address possible objections? • Is the prototype itself an original contribution to knowledge? We also outline some implications for funding agencies interested in supporting researchers who are designing experimental computer prototypes. For instance, if a series of prototypes functions as a set of smaller arguments within a larger debate, it might be more appropriate to fund the sequence rather than treating each project as an individual proposal.

106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the dual nature of that challenge and outlined some principles toward the bibliographical study of e-books, taking the Canadian novel The Sentimentalists (Gaspereau Press, 2009) as a test case.
Abstract: E-books are human artifacts and bear the traces of their making no less for being digital, though they bear those traces in ways bibliographers have yet to explain thoroughly. The bibliographic consideration of e-books is a dual challenge in that it must reckon not only with unfamiliar forms of textuality but also with a pervasive cultural discourse about e-books that tends to mystify the textual condition itself. This article explores the dual nature of that challenge and outlines some principles toward the bibliographical study of e-books, taking the Canadian novel The Sentimentalists (Gaspereau Press, 2009) as a test case.

51 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors report on a pilot study of four book history students and their processes of archival meaning-making, focusing on behaviors of an interpretive rather than forensic nature.
Abstract: Over the last 20 years, humanities and archival scholars have theorized the ways in which archives imbue records with meaning. However, archival scholars have not sufficiently examined how users understand the meaning of the records they find. Building on the premise that how users come to make meaning from records is greatly in need of examination, this paper reports on a pilot study of four book history students and their processes of archival meaning-making. We focus in particular on behaviors of an interpretive rather than forensic nature. This article includes a discussion of the theoretical concepts and scholarly literature that shaped our goals for this paper. It then discusses the methodology and our interpretations of the research findings, before turning to a discussion of the findings’ implications and directions for future work.

24 citations

21 Oct 2009
TL;DR: Architectures of the Book (or ArchBook) as discussed by the authors is an online knowledge base, which illustrates the features, technologies, and practices of transmitting knowledge in textual form, and is the most comprehensive online reference for the history of the book.
Abstract: Textual scholars have served both as chroniclers of how humans interact with their written records, and, more actively, as agents themselves in many of the changes that those interactions have undergone. This chapter describes the rationale and initial goals of a particular group of digital textual scholars, the Textual Studies team within the Implementing New Knowledge Environments project (INKE.ca), but also considers the role of textual studies generally in a digital world. This chapter also outlines the online knowledge base, titled Architectures of the Book (or ArchBook), which illustrates the features, technologies, and practices of transmitting knowledge in textual form. ArchBook will not only be the most comprehensive online reference for the history of the book, but will also promote research on the future of the book through its focus on the information architecture of texts.

23 citations

Book
Alan Galey1
30 Sep 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, Galey explores the entwined histories of Shakespearean texts and archival technologies over the past four centuries and analyzes how Shakespeare became prototypical material for publishing experiments and new media projects, as well as for theories of archiving and computing.
Abstract: Why is Shakespeare so often associated with information technologies and with the idea of archiving itself? Alan Galey explores this question through the entwined histories of Shakespearean texts and archival technologies over the past four centuries. In chapters dealing with the archive, the book, photography, sound, information, and data, Galey analyzes how Shakespeare became prototypical material for publishing experiments, and new media projects, as well as for theories of archiving and computing. Analyzing examples of the Shakespearean archive from the seventeenth century to today, he takes an original approach to Shakespeare and new media that will be of interest to scholars of the digital humanities, Shakespeare studies, archives, and media history. Rejecting the idea that current forms of computing are the result of technical forces beyond the scope of humanist inquiry, this book instead offers a critical prehistory of digitization read through the afterlives of Shakespeare's texts.

16 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: Booth, Colomb and Williams as discussed by the authors presented a completely revised and updated version of their classic handbook, "The Craft of Research" for students and researchers to conduct research and report it effectively.
Abstract: Since 1995, more than 150,000 students and researchers have turned to "The Craft of Research" for clear and helpful guidance on how to conduct research and report it effectively. Now, master teachers Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams present a completely revised and updated version of their classic handbook. Like its predecessor, this new edition reflects the way researchers actually work: in a complex circuit of thinking, writing, revising and rethinking. It shows how each part of this process influences the others and how a successful research report is an orchestrated conversation between a researcher and a reader. Along with many other topics, "The Craft of Research" explains how to build an argument that motivates readers to accept a claim; how to anticipate the reservations of thoughtful yet critical readers and to respond to them appropriately; and how to create introductions and conclusions that answer that most demanding question, "So what?" This popular book retains its five-part structure. Part 1 provides an orientation to the research process and begins the discussion of what motivates researchers and their readers. Part 2 focuses on finding a topic, planning the project and locating appropriate sources. This section is brought up to date with new information on the role of the Internet in research, including how to find and evaluate sources, avoid their misuse and test their reliability. Part 3 explains the art of making an argument and supporting it. The authors have extensively revised this section to present the structure of an argument in clearer and more accessible terms than in the first edition. New distinctions are made among "reasons", "evidence", and "reports of evidence". The concepts of "qualifications and rebuttals" are recast as "acknowledgement and response". Part 4 covers drafting and revising, and offers new information on the visual representation of data. Part 5 concludes the book with an updated discussion of the ethics of research, as well as an expanded bibliography that includes many electronic sources. The new edition retains the accessibility, insights and directness that have made "The Craft of Research" a useful guide for anyone doing research, from students in high school through advanced graduate study to business people and government employees. The authors demonstrate convincingly that researching and reporting skills can be learned and used by all who undertake research projects.

622 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The aim is to foster an academic culture of discursive knowledge construction of intermediate-level knowledge and of how it can be produced and assessed in design-oriented HCI research.
Abstract: Design-oriented research practices create opportunities for constructing knowledge that is more abstracted than particular instances, without aspiring to be at the scope of generalized theories. We propose an intermediate design knowledge form that we name strong concepts that has the following properties: is generative and carries a core design idea, cutting across particular use situations and even application domains; concerned with interactive behavior, not static appearance; is a design element and a part of an artifact and, at the same time, speaks of a use practice and behavior over time; and finally, resides on an abstraction level above particular instances. We present two strong concepts—social navigation and seamfulness—and discuss how they fulfil criteria we might have on knowledge, such as being contestable, defensible, and substantive. Our aim is to foster an academic culture of discursive knowledge construction of intermediate-level knowledge and of how it can be produced and assessed in design-oriented HCI research.

396 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Over the last fifteen years many of these traditional and sometimes competing kinds of bibliography have been drawing together into a new historical genre represented by a growing volume of monographs and journal articles and complete with the now obligatory French label as a seal of academic respectability-histoire du livre, best translated perhaps as "the historical sociology of the book".
Abstract: or £50 the set. Bookmen have never managed to achieve an agreed definition of their field of study. Bibliography has been claimed on the one hand by mere, but useful, enumerators of authors and titles and on the other by lofty textual critics and scarcely less elevated literary ones. The librarians appropriated the subject as part of their professional mystery, only to abandon it for the siren lure of silicon chip and management studies. There were the chaps whose austere and sole delight was to reveal, exclusively to each other, the intricacies of press-figures, skeleton-formes, turned chain-lines, pin-holes, and compositorial analysis. Others devoted their labours to charting the evolution of type design, the careers of publishing houses, or the distribution of paper-mills. Some even deserted the medium for the package, in spite of the late Harry Carter's contemptuous dismissal of the ancient craft of bookbinding as \"a species of cobbling\". Over the last fifteen years many of these traditional and sometimes competing kinds of bibliography have been drawing together into a new historical genre represented by a growing volume of monographs and journal articles and complete with the now obligatory French label as a seal of academic respectability-histoire du livre, best translated perhaps as \"the historical sociology of the book\". It will come as no surprise to learn that the French inspiration and first embodiment of the enterprise came in a series called Histoire et civilisation du livre, sponsored by the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Centre de Recherches d'Histoire et de Philologie in Paris.' The general editor, and a notable contributor, Henri Jean Martin, was a pupil of, and later a collaborator with, no less a scholar than the social historian and co-founder of Annales, Lucien Febvre. The flavour of the new bibliographical history (\"la biblio-logie retrospective\" is a recently used alternative label) may be caught from the title of Martin's own contribution to the series, Livre, pouvoirs et societe 'a Paris au XVII siecle.2 English-language readers had their first substantial taste of the new French confection in 1976 with the publication of David Gerard's translation of Febvre and Martin's L'apparition du livre under the title The coming of the book: the impact of printing 1450-J800.3 Much of the factual material in that book was from well-known secondary sources but the arrangement and conclusions revealed the authors' intellectual allegiance. English readers received a salutary jolt from a crisp demonstration …

339 citations