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Alan V. Oppenheim

Other affiliations: Max Planck Society
Bio: Alan V. Oppenheim is an academic researcher from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Signal processing & Signal. The author has an hindex of 59, co-authored 214 publications receiving 29010 citations. Previous affiliations of Alan V. Oppenheim include Max Planck Society.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide a thorough treatment of the fundamental theorems and properties of discrete-time linear systems, filtering, sampling, and discrete time Fourier analysis.
Abstract: For senior/graduate-level courses in Discrete-Time Signal Processing. THE definitive, authoritative text on DSP -- ideal for those with an introductory-level knowledge of signals and systems. Written by prominent, DSP pioneers, it provides thorough treatment of the fundamental theorems and properties of discrete-time linear systems, filtering, sampling, and discrete-time Fourier Analysis. By focusing on the general and universal concepts in discrete-time signal processing, it remains vital and relevant to the new challenges arising in the field --without limiting itself to specific technologies with relatively short life spans.

10,388 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1981
TL;DR: Specific conditions under which a sequence can be exactly reconstructed from phase are reviewed, both for one-dimensional and multi-dimensional sequences, and algorithms for both approximate and exact reconstruction of signals from phase information are presented.
Abstract: In the Fourier representation of signals, spectral magnitude and phase tend to play different roles and in some situations many of the important features of a signal are preserved if only the phase is retained. Furthermore, under a variety of conditions, such as when a signal is of finite length, phase information alone is sufficient to completely reconstruct a signal to within a scale factor. In this paper, we review and discuss these observations and results in a number of different contexts and applications. Specifically, the intelligibility of phase-only reconstruction for images, speech, and crystallographic structures are illustrated. Several approaches to justifying the relative importance of phase through statistical arguments are presented, along with a number of informal arguments suggesting reasons for the importance of phase. Specific conditions under which a sequence can be exactly reconstructed from phase are reviewed, both for one-dimensional and multi-dimensional sequences, and algorithms for both approximate and exact reconstruction of signals from phase information are presented. A number of applications of the observations and results in this paper are suggested.

1,850 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An analog circuit implementation of the chaotic Lorenz system is described and used to demonstrate two possible approaches to private communications based on synchronized chaotic systems and a potential approach to communications applications based on signal masking and recovery.
Abstract: An analog circuit implementation of the chaotic Lorenz system is described and used to demonstrate two possible approaches to private communications based on synchronized chaotic systems.

1,466 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
26 Jun 1979
TL;DR: An overview of the variety of techniques that have been proposed for enhancement and bandwidth compression of speech degraded by additive background noise is provided to suggest a unifying framework in terms of which the relationships between these systems is more visible and which hopefully provides a structure which will suggest fruitful directions for further research.
Abstract: Over the past several years there has been considerable attention focused on the problem of enhancement and bandwidth compression of speech degraded by additive background noise. This interest is motivated by several factors including a broad set of important applications, the apparent lack of robustness in current speech-compression systems and the development of several potentially promising and practical solutions. One objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the variety of techniques that have been proposed for enhancement and bandwidth compression of speech degraded by additive background noise. A second objective is to suggest a unifying framework in terms of which the relationships between these systems is more visible and which hopefully provides a structure which will suggest fruitful directions for further research.

1,236 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: An introduction to a Transient World and an Approximation Tour of Wavelet Packet and Local Cosine Bases.
Abstract: Introduction to a Transient World. Fourier Kingdom. Discrete Revolution. Time Meets Frequency. Frames. Wavelet Zoom. Wavelet Bases. Wavelet Packet and Local Cosine Bases. An Approximation Tour. Estimations are Approximations. Transform Coding. Appendix A: Mathematical Complements. Appendix B: Software Toolboxes.

17,693 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current state of the art of sensor networks is captured in this article, where solutions are discussed under their related protocol stack layer sections.
Abstract: The advancement in wireless communications and electronics has enabled the development of low-cost sensor networks. The sensor networks can be used for various application areas (e.g., health, military, home). For different application areas, there are different technical issues that researchers are currently resolving. The current state of the art of sensor networks is captured in this article, where solutions are discussed under their related protocol stack layer sections. This article also points out the open research issues and intends to spark new interests and developments in this field.

14,048 citations

Christopher M. Bishop1
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: Probability distributions of linear models for regression and classification are given in this article, along with a discussion of combining models and combining models in the context of machine learning and classification.
Abstract: Probability Distributions.- Linear Models for Regression.- Linear Models for Classification.- Neural Networks.- Kernel Methods.- Sparse Kernel Machines.- Graphical Models.- Mixture Models and EM.- Approximate Inference.- Sampling Methods.- Continuous Latent Variables.- Sequential Data.- Combining Models.

10,141 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
27 Jul 2000-Nature
TL;DR: It is found that scale-free networks, which include the World-Wide Web, the Internet, social networks and cells, display an unexpected degree of robustness, the ability of their nodes to communicate being unaffected even by unrealistically high failure rates.
Abstract: Many complex systems display a surprising degree of tolerance against errors. For example, relatively simple organisms grow, persist and reproduce despite drastic pharmaceutical or environmental interventions, an error tolerance attributed to the robustness of the underlying metabolic network1. Complex communication networks2 display a surprising degree of robustness: although key components regularly malfunction, local failures rarely lead to the loss of the global information-carrying ability of the network. The stability of these and other complex systems is often attributed to the redundant wiring of the functional web defined by the systems' components. Here we demonstrate that error tolerance is not shared by all redundant systems: it is displayed only by a class of inhomogeneously wired networks, called scale-free networks, which include the World-Wide Web3,4,5, the Internet6, social networks7 and cells8. We find that such networks display an unexpected degree of robustness, the ability of their nodes to communicate being unaffected even by unrealistically high failure rates. However, error tolerance comes at a high price in that these networks are extremely vulnerable to attacks (that is, to the selection and removal of a few nodes that play a vital role in maintaining the network's connectivity). Such error tolerance and attack vulnerability are generic properties of communication networks.

7,697 citations

Book
16 Mar 2001

7,058 citations