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Alexander Knysh

Bio: Alexander Knysh is an academic researcher from University of Michigan. The author has contributed to research in topics: Islam & Sufism. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 26 publications receiving 348 citations. Previous affiliations of Alexander Knysh include Washington University in St. Louis.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: In this paper, a general survey of the rise and development of Islamic mysticism up to the modern period is presented, taking into account the latest achievements of scholarship on the subject.
Abstract: This is a general survey of the rise and development of Islamic mysticism (Sufism) up to the modern period, which takes into account the latest achievements of scholarship on the subject. Sufism is examined from a variety of perspectives: as a vibrant social institution, a specific form of artistic expression, an ascetic and contemplative practice, and a distinctive intellectual tradition. Islamic Mysticism by Knysh is a comprehensive survey of the interesting and fascinating world of Islamic Mysticism.

107 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a task consists of not treating discourses as groups of signs (signifying elements referring to contents or representations) but as practices that systematically form the objects of which they speak.
Abstract: "We shall not return to the state anterior to discourse—in which nothing has yet been said, and in which things are only just beginning to emerge out of the grey light; and we shall not pass beyond discourse in order to rediscover the forms that it has created and left behind it; we shall remain, or try to remain, at the level of discourse itself…A task consists of not—of no longer—treating discourses as groups of signs (signifying elements referring to contents or representations) but as practices that systematically form the objects of which they speak."

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In late August and early September of 1999, the so-called Russian anti-terrorist operation in Daghestan, an autonomous republic of the Russian Federation, was in full swing following its invas...
Abstract: In late August – early September of 1999, when the so-called Russian ‘anti-terrorist’ operation in Daghestan, an autonomous republic of the Russian Federation, was in full swing following its invas...

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role of Islam in the political role of Islamic Revivalist, resistance, and opposition movements of the 18th and 19th centuries is discussed in this paper. But the authors do not consider the role of Sufi Sufi ideology and institutions in these movements.
Abstract: Over the past four decades Western experts on the Middle East and Islam have spilled much ink in accounting for the political role of those Islamic “revivalist,” “resistance” and “opposition” movements of the 18th and 19th centuries that seemed to derive their vitality from “reformed” Sufi ideologies and institutions.1 According to many Western scholars, these ideologies and institutions arose in response to the new political and economic realities of the modern epoch that was characterized, first and foremost, by the growing ascendancy of Europe and the perceived decline of the Muslim world.2 Many

23 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Familiarity, ease of access, trust, and awareness of risks, will all be important for the future.
Abstract: 萨义德以其独特的双重身份,对西方中心权力话语做了分析,通过对文学作品、演讲演说等文本的解读,将O rie n ta lis m——"东方学",做了三重释义:一门学科、一种思维方式和一种权力话语系统,对东方学权力话语做了系统的批判,同时将东方学放入空间维度对东方学文本做了细致的解读。

3,845 citations

BookDOI
TL;DR: Hadrami Society, an Old Diaspora I. Burial 1. The Society of the Absent 2. Geography, a Pathway through History 3. GENEALOGICAL TRAVEL 4. Ecumenical Islam in an Oceanic World 5. Creole Kinship: Genealogy as Gift Conclusion to Part II: Local Cosmopolitans III. Return as Pilgrimage as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: List of Illustrations Acknowledgments Note on Dates, Abbreviations, and Transliteration Preface: Hadrami Society, an Old Diaspora I. BURIAL 1. The Society of the Absent 2. Geography, a Pathway through History 3. A Resolute Localism Conclusion to Part I: Making Tarim a Place of Return II. GENEALOGICAL TRAVEL 4. Ecumenical Islam in an Oceanic World 5. Hybrid Texts: Genealogy as Light and as Law 6. Creole Kinship: Genealogy as Gift Conclusion to Part II: Local Cosmopolitans III. RETURNS 7. Return as Pilgrimage 8. Repatriation 9. The View from the Verandah 10. Evictions Concluding Remarks: Names beyond Nations Bibliography Index

345 citations

Book
20 Feb 2006
TL;DR: Commins' book as discussed by the authors examines the debate on the nature of Wahhabism, and offers original findings on its ascendance in Saudi Arabia and spread throughout other parts of the Muslim world such as Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Abstract: This book reveals the theories that inspire al-Qaeda. There is no other accessible book on the subject. This is the sect that threatens the stability of Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. Wahhabism has been generating controversy since it first emerged in Arabia in the 18th century. In the wake of September 11th instant theories have emerged that try to root Osama Bin Laden's attacks on Wahhabism. Muslim critics have dismissed this conservative interpretation of Islam that is the official creed of Saudi Arabia as an unorthodox innovation that manipulated a suggestible people to gain political influence. David Commins' book questions this assumption. He examines the debate on the nature of Wahhabism, and offers original findings on its ascendance in Saudi Arabia and spread throughout other parts of the Muslim world such as Afghanistan and Pakistan. He also assesses the challenge that radical militants within Saudi Arabia pose to the region, and draws conclusions which will concern all those who follow events in the Kingdom. "The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia" is essential reading for anyone interested in the Middle East and Islamic radicalism today.

220 citations

Book
19 Dec 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, Marsden's Living Islam is both a "classically" ethnographic and vividly fresh study of intellectual and moral life in Chitral that successfully highlights the cultural,intellectual and moral strategies Chitrals resort to in order to negotiate the stresses and challenges of modernization and the Islamist-inspired volatile political situation surrounding their region.
Abstract: Winner of American Institute of Pakistan Studies Book Prize (2008). Living Islam is both a “classically” ethnographic and vividly fresh study of intellectual and moral life in Chitral that successfully highlights the cultural,intellectual and moral strategies Chitralis resort to in order to negotiate the stresses and challenges of modernization and the Islamist-inspired volatile political situation surrounding their region. What is remarkable is that Marsden manages to bring the ideas and self-representations of the Rowshanis out so plausibly and uncomplicatedly. While there are many studies of the Islamist challenge to traditional Muslim societies, few have looked beyond the national or state level and the urban milieu. By situating his work in small towns and villages in an ethnically and religiously diverse region, and by trying to understand and explain the ways in which rural people use their cultural resources to intellectually and morally engage with serious, and often dangerous and violent, geo-political phenomena, Marsden has produced a study that is not only relevant to anthropologists but also political scientists and those interested in political Islam.

174 citations

Book
25 Mar 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, Hamza, my infertile driver, discusses the emergence of Masculinities in the Middle East and their relation to assisted reproduction in Islam and assisted reproduction fatwas.
Abstract: List of Figures ix List of Tables xi Prologue: Hamza, My Infertile Driver xiii Introduct ion: Reconceiving Middle Eastern Manhood Part I : Emergent Masculini t ies Chapter 1. Hegemonic Masculinity 39 Chapter 2. Infertile Subjectivities 63 Chapter 3. Love Stories 91 Chapter 4. Consanguineous Connectivity 123 Part II : Islamic Masculini t ies Chapter 5. Masturbation and Semen Collection 161 Chapter 6. Islam and Assisted Reproduction 193 Chapter 7. Sperm Donation and Adoption 228 Chapter 8. Egg Donation and Emergence 262 Conclus ion: Emergent Masculinities in the Middle East 299 Acknowledgments 319 Appendix: The Assisted Reproduction Fatwas 325 Glossary of Arabic Terms 333 Glossary of Medical Terms 337 Notes 345 References Cited 363 Index 389

162 citations