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Author

Alibakhsh Kasaeian

Other affiliations: University of Zanjan
Bio: Alibakhsh Kasaeian is an academic researcher from University of Tehran. The author has contributed to research in topics: Nanofluid & Renewable energy. The author has an hindex of 47, co-authored 186 publications receiving 7116 citations. Previous affiliations of Alibakhsh Kasaeian include University of Zanjan.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a comprehensive review is conducted on the simultaneous application of nanofluids and porous media for heat transfer enhancement purposes in thermal systems with different structures, flow regimes, and boundary conditions.

333 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the applications of nanofluids on different types of solar collectors, photovoltaic systems and solar thermoelectrics are reviewed, and the efforts done on the energy storage system (ESS) have been reviewed.
Abstract: The negative impact of human activities on the environment receives tremendous attention, especially on the increased global temperature. To combat climate change, clean and sustainable energy sources need to be rapidly developed. Solar energy technology is considered as one of the ideal candidates, which directly converts solar energy into electricity and heat without any greenhouse gas emissions. In both areas, high-performance cooling, heating and electricity generation is one of the vital needs. Modern nanotechnology can produce metallic or nonmetallic particles of nanometer dimensions which have unique mechanical, optical, electrical, magnetic, and thermal properties. Studies in this field indicate that exploiting nanofluid in solar systems, offers unique advantages over conventional fluids. In this paper, the applications of nanofluids on different types of solar collectors, photovoltaic systems and solar thermoelectrics are reviewed. Beside the wide range of energy conversion, the efforts done on the energy storage system (ESS) have been reviewed. In the field of economics, nanotech reduces manufacturing costs as a result of using a low temperature process.

307 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2017-Energy
TL;DR: A hybrid genetic algorithm with particle swarm optimization (GA-PSO) is applied for the optimal sizing of an off-grid house with photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and battery, and results show that the proposed approach with 0.502 of the levelized cost of energy for the PV/WT/BAT system has the best result through the compared methods.

306 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1968-Nature
TL;DR: The Thermophysical Properties Research Literature Retrieval Guide as discussed by the authors was published by Y. S. Touloukian, J. K. Gerritsen and N. Y. Moore.
Abstract: Thermophysical Properties Research Literature Retrieval Guide Edited by Y. S. Touloukian, J. K. Gerritsen and N. Y. Moore Second edition, revised and expanded. Book 1: Pp. xxi + 819. Book 2: Pp.621. Book 3: Pp. ix + 1315. (New York: Plenum Press, 1967.) n.p.

1,240 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors highlight previous influential studies and ongoing research to use this chemical as a viable energy vector for power applications, emphasizing the challenges that each of the reviewed technologies faces before implementation and commercial deployment is achieved at a larger scale.

908 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The International Nanofluid Property Benchmark Exercise (INPBE) as discussed by the authors was held in 1998, where the thermal conductivity of identical samples of colloidally stable dispersions of nanoparticles or "nanofluids" was measured by over 30 organizations worldwide, using a variety of experimental approaches, including the transient hot wire method, steady state methods, and optical methods.
Abstract: This article reports on the International Nanofluid Property Benchmark Exercise, or INPBE, in which the thermal conductivity of identical samples of colloidally stable dispersions of nanoparticles or “nanofluids,” was measured by over 30 organizations worldwide, using a variety of experimental approaches, including the transient hot wire method, steady-state methods, and optical methods. The nanofluids tested in the exercise were comprised of aqueous and nonaqueous basefluids, metal and metal oxide particles, near-spherical and elongated particles, at low and high particle concentrations. The data analysis reveals that the data from most organizations lie within a relatively narrow band (±10% or less) about the sample average with only few outliers. The thermal conductivity of the nanofluids was found to increase with particle concentration and aspect ratio, as expected from classical theory. There are (small) systematic differences in the absolute values of the nanofluid thermal conductivity among the various experimental approaches; however, such differences tend to disappear when the data are normalized to the measured thermal conductivity of the basefluid. The effective medium theory developed for dispersed particles by Maxwell in 1881 and recently generalized by Nan et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 81, 6692 (1997)], was found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, suggesting that no anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity was achieved in the nanofluids tested in this exercise.

881 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide an updated review of studies related to membrane modules (plate and frame, tubular, spiral wound, and hollow fiber) and membrane characterization and discuss membrane cleaning and different pre-treatment technologies in place for RO desalination, such as feed-water pretreatment and biocides.

660 citations