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Alice Croq

Bio: Alice Croq is an academic researcher from École pratique des hautes études. The author has contributed to research in topics: Philosophy of religion. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 6 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the reception of parabiblical narratives in hadith literature and Islamic historiography is investigated, taking the Testament of Abraham as a case study, and analyzing a particular literary motif shared by this text and an early version of the miʿrāǧ (Ascension) of the Prophet Muhammad.
Abstract: Abstract This brief note aims at contributing to the study of the reception of parabiblical narratives in hadith literature and Islamic historiography. Taking the Testament of Abraham as a case study, it sets out to analyse a particular literary motif shared by this text and an early version of the miʿrāǧ (Ascension) of the Prophet Muhammad. The comparative analysis demonstrates that the Testament of Abraham could have provided a number of elements for the redaction of at least one particular section of the miʿrāǧ. This hypothesis finds support in other cases of textual correspondence between several sections of the Testament of Abraham and other Islamic works such as the Tafsīr of Muqātil ibn Sulaymān (d. 150/767), the unedited Kitāb Mubtadaʾ al-dunyā wa-qiṣaṣ al-anbiyāʾ of Abū Ḥuḏayfa al-Buḫārī Isḥāq ibn Bišr (d. 206/821) and Ibn ʿAsākir’s Taʾrīḫ madīnat Dimašq (d. 571/1176). The examined material thus throws additional light on the continuity between late antique apocrypha and nascent Arabic literature.

6 citations


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Book ChapterDOI
01 Aug 2013
TL;DR: In this article, the authors highlight what is presently at stake in Qur'anic studies, what are the pitfalls we have to beware of and how we can break a path through the thicket of contradicting scholarly positions in order to restore the image of the Qur'an as a text that concerns culturally and religiously committed individuals in general.
Abstract: Why do we need a scholarly reading of the Qur’an? Not perhaps for the sake of a spiritually deeper Muslim understanding. But maybe for the sake of reclaiming the Qur’an’s universal significance, to remind of its message as raḥmatan li’lālamīn, as addressed ultimately to all mankind. And perhaps, most importantly, for preserving its integrity, correcting present misconceptions. The scholarly reading of the Qur’an today then is a politically relevant task. In the following, I wish to highlight what is presently at stake in Qur’anic studies, what are the pitfalls we have to beware of and how we can break a path through the thicket of contradicting scholarly positions in order to restore the image of the Qur’an as a text that concerns culturally and religiously committed individuals in general. Allow me to start with a short gaze back: Until a few decades ago, Qur’anic studies in the West was an “exotic” discipline housed under the wide roof of Oriental Studies, which was then still dominated by “philology”, i.e. textual investigations into Arabic literary and historical works ranging from the 5 th century to the present. In the seventies, however, a parting of the ways occurred, separating textual studies, “philology”, from “area studies”. This new field of area studies –not least thanks to its surplus value as a provider of geopolitically relevant knowledge about the Middle East– came to prevail pushing aside textual studies, “philology” that appeared out-dated, antiquarian and a-political. Not only for pragmatic reasons but ideological as well. Edward Said’s seminal work Orientalism in 1979 initiated an attitude of disdain and even suspicion vis-à-vis oriental philology, a polemic which was continued vehemently by others under the banner of “postcolonial studies”. What finally came to rescue textual scholarship was an unexpected political development: the urgency to rethink the Middle East after the shock of 9/11. A vast number of centers were

3 citations