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Aline Meysonnat

Other affiliations: United Nations University
Bio: Aline Meysonnat is an academic researcher from University of Washington. The author has contributed to research in topics: Child marriage & Implicit attitude. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 7 publications receiving 17 citations. Previous affiliations of Aline Meysonnat include United Nations University.

Papers
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01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide empirical evidence on the cross-sectional and temporal effects of micro-level and macro-level factors on child marriage in three South Asian countries, namely Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan.
Abstract: This study provides empirical evidence on the cross-sectional and temporal effects of micro-level and macro-level factors on child marriage in three South Asian countries, namely Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan. While micro-level effects on child marriage are extensively documented, the effects of macro-level drivers remain an open area of inquiry. To the extent that child marriage leads to limited opportunities and violation of basic human rights, this research seeks primarily to investigate those macro-level circumstances that are most effective in reducing the prevalence of child marriage in selected contexts. This study defines child marriage as a legal or customary union between two individuals, of whom one or both parties are younger than 18 years of age.

14 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors studied forced migration from multiple countries of origin to 28 European countries in the years either side of two "migration crises" (the wars in the Balkans and the Arab Spring) and found that partial adjustment and network effects are key pull factors, with employment rate in the destination country the only significant economic variable.
Abstract: Violent conflict is a well-recognised driver of forced migration but literature does not usually consider the pull factors that might also cause irregular movements. In turn, the decision to leave and of where to go are rarely considered separately. This is in contrast to literature on regular international migration, which considers both push and pull factors. We contribute to these literatures by studying bilateral forced migration from multiple countries of origin to 28 European countries in the years either side of two "migration crises" – the wars in the Balkans and the Arab Spring. We pay attention to dynamics by analysing lagged flows and stocks of forced migrants and modelling their spatial distribution. We find that these partial adjustment and network effects are key pull factors, with employment rate in the destination country the only significant economic variable. In addition, we demonstrate that it is episodes of escalating conflict, rather than accumulated violence, that drives decisions to leave. Out-of-sample predictions indicate that if conflict in origin countries were to cease, forced migration would continue, albeit at a significantly reduced rate. Our findings suggest that past patterns of forced migration help shape future flows, that forced migration flows cannot easily be stopped by destination country policies, and that preventing conflict escalation is important for preventing forced migration.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new field application of the implicit association test (IAT), next to a set of standard survey questions, was used to measure implicit gender attitudes in Tunisia and found that the video mitigates the implicit gender bias only among the specific subpopulation of conservative women.

5 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce the concept of vitality threshold, which captures the idea that being near subsistence consumption levels not only has an impact on the ability to save, but also on the willingness to save.
Abstract: This paper proposes an integrated framework that incorporates both the "physical" and the "behavioural" dimensions of poverty in developing countries and their consequences for aggregate savings behaviour. To this end a concept is introduced, labelled "vitality", which captures the idea that being near subsistence consumption levels not only has an impact on the ability to save, but also on the willingness to save. We introduce the notion of a "vitality threshold" which marks a situation where the willingness to invest into the future changes - this is represented by a change in the discount rates. The recognition of transition paths from a "pessimistic", low-savings regime with high discount rates to an "optimistic" regime with relatively high savings enables us to analyse the transition of countries through various stages of development. In addition to this, we can shed new light on poverty traps by looking at below subsistence consumption scenarios. Finally we can infer specific policy implications concerning development aid. For instance, if a country is in a pessimistic, low-savings regime, we argue that a transfer should be high enough to push a country above the subsistence-level consumption threshold by far enough to enable it to reach the optimistic, high savings regime and consequently grow out of poverty. The existence of vitality thresholds implies that marginal changes in development assistance may have non-marginal long-term effects

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2022-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors explore region-level indicators to predict the persistence of child marriage in four countries in South Asia, namely Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan, and develop a prediction model that relies largely on regional and local inputs such as droughts, floods, population growth and nightlight data to model the incidence of child marriages.
Abstract: Globally, 21 percent of young women are married before their 18th birthday. Despite some progress in addressing child marriage, it remains a widespread practice, in particular in South Asia. While household predictors of child marriage have been studied extensively in the literature, the evidence base on macro-economic factors contributing to child marriage and models that predict where child marriage cases are most likely to occur remains limited. In this paper we aim to fill this gap and explore region-level indicators to predict the persistence of child marriage in four countries in South Asia, namely Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan. We apply machine learning techniques to child marriage data and develop a prediction model that relies largely on regional and local inputs such as droughts, floods, population growth and nightlight data to model the incidence of child marriages. We find that our gradient boosting model is able to identify a large proportion of the true child marriage cases and correctly classifies 77% of the true marriage cases, with a higher accuracy in Bangladesh (92% of the cases) and a lower accuracy in Nepal (70% of cases). In addition, all countries contain in their top 10 variables for classification nighttime light growth, a shock index of drought over the previous and the last two years and the regional level of education, suggesting that income shocks, regional economic activity and regional education levels play a significant role in predicting child marriage. Given the accuracy of the model to predict child marriage, our model is a valuable tool to support policy design in countries where household-level data remains limited.

1 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
Nora Lustig1
TL;DR: Banerjee and Dufloated as mentioned in this paper, "Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty", by Abhijit Banerjee, and Esther Duflo.
Abstract: Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, by Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo. Jackson, TN: PublicAffairs, 2011. 320 pp. ISBN: 978-1-58648-798-0 (hbk.). US$26.99. Po...

345 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Investments across multiple sectors are required to understand and address EM and ECB, which are pervasive social determinants of maternal and child wellbeing in South Asia, with large subnational variation in most countries.
Abstract: Early marriage (EM) and early childbearing (ECB) have far-reaching consequences. This study describes the prevalence, trends, inequalities, and drivers of EM and ECB in South Asia using eight rounds of Demographic and Health Survey data across 13 years. We report the percentage of ever-married women aged 20-24 years (n = 105,150) married before 18 years (EM) and with a live birth before 20 years (ECB). Relative trends were examined using average annual rate of reduction (AARR). Inequalities were examined by geography, marital household wealth, residence, and education. Sociodemographic drivers of changes for EM were assessed using regression decomposition analyses. We find that EM/ECB are still common in Bangladesh (69%/69%), Nepal (52%/51%), India (41%/39%), and Pakistan (37%/38%), with large subnational variation in most countries. EM has declined fastest in India (AARR of -3.8%/year), Pakistan (-2.8%/year), and Bangladesh (-1.5%/year), but EM elimination by 2030 will not occur at these rates. Equity analyses show that poor, uneducated women in rural areas are disproportionately burdened. Regression decomposition analysis shows that improvements in wealth and education explained 44% (India) to 96% (Nepal) of the actual EM reduction. Investments across multiple sectors are required to understand and address EM and ECB, which are pervasive social determinants of maternal and child wellbeing.

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a simplified conceptual framework that connects an understanding of the drivers of child marriage for girls to decisions about the design of interventions to delay marriage within different contexts and support married girls.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The analysis suggests that increasing the age at marriage and discouraging child marriage may be a fruitful way to improve mother and child health in Bangladesh and encouraging girls to complete high school and pursue college education would also help decline the rate of child marriage and, in turn, benefit social mobility and health.

25 citations