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Alison Gwilt

Bio: Alison Gwilt is an academic researcher from University of New South Wales. The author has contributed to research in topics: Clothing & Fashion design. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 24 publications receiving 319 citations. Previous affiliations of Alison Gwilt include University of Technology, Sydney & University of South Australia.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
07 Apr 2020
TL;DR: In this article, the authors identify the environmental impacts at critical points in the textile and fashion value chain, from production to consumption, focusing on water use, chemical pollution, CO2 emissions and textile waste.
Abstract: The fashion industry is facing increasing global scrutiny of its environmentally polluting supply chain operations. Despite the widely publicized environmental impacts, however, the industry continues to grow, in part due to the rise of fast fashion, which relies on cheap manufacturing, frequent consumption and short-lived garment use. In this Review, we identify the environmental impacts at critical points in the textile and fashion value chain, from production to consumption, focusing on water use, chemical pollution, CO2 emissions and textile waste. Impacts from the fashion industry include over 92 million tonnes of waste produced per year and 79 trillion litres of water consumed. On the basis of these environmental impacts, we outline the need for fundamental changes in the fashion business model, including a deceleration of manufacturing and the introduction of sustainable practices throughout the supply chain, as well a shift in consumer behaviour — namely, decreasing clothing purchases and increasing garment lifetimes. These changes stress the need for an urgent transition back to ‘slow’ fashion, minimizing and mitigating the detrimental environmental impacts, so as to improve the long-term sustainability of the fashion supply chain. The increase in clothing consumption, exemplified in fast fashion, has severe environmental consequences. This Review discusses the impacts of fashion on natural resources and the environment, and examines how technology, policy and consumer behaviour can mitigate the negative effects of the fashion industry.

373 citations

BookDOI
25 Jun 2012
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a practical guide to the ways in which designers are creating fashion with less waste and greater durability, based on the results of extensive research into lifecycle approaches to sustainable fashion.
Abstract: The production, use and eventual disposal of most clothing is environmentally damaging, and many fashion and textile designers are becoming keen to employ more sustainable strategies in their work. This book provides a practical guide to the ways in which designers are creating fashion with less waste and greater durability. Based on the results of extensive research into lifecycle approaches to sustainable fashion, the book is divided into four sections: source: explores the motivations for the selection of materials for fashion garments and suggests that garments can be made from materials that also assist in the management of textile waste make: discusses the differing approaches to the design and manufacture of sustainable fashion garments that can also provide the opportunity for waste control and minimization use: explores schemes that encourage the consumer to engage in slow fashion consumption last: examines alternative solutions to the predictable fate of most garments – landfill. Illustrated throughout with case studies of best practice from international designers and fashion labels and written in a practical, accessible style, this is a must-have guide for fashion and textile designers and students in their areas.

124 citations

Book
27 Mar 2014
TL;DR: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion as discussed by the authors provides an overview of the following topics: garment design; sourcing and selecting fabrics and techniques; pattern making and toiling; garment construction; distribution; clothing care and maintenance; reuse and remanufacture; and material recycling; and it also covers the following sustainable design approaches: design for empathy; using mono materials; zero waste techniques; design for durability; engaging with local communities; designing for need; reducing laundering, design for repair; upcycling; and design for closed-loop systems.
Abstract: Packed with full-colour images from contributors such as Vivienne Westwood, Stella McCartney, Edun and People Tree, A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion is a much-needed handbook for academics, researchers, students and professionals in the fashion and textiles industries. Beginning with a reflection on current models of fashion design and production, this book introduces the key issues associated with the production, use and disposal of fashion clothing and provides a framework on how to identify and evaluate the potential impacts of a garment during the design process. Featuring industry perspectives alongside practice-based discussions, the final five chapters of the book explore a range of ways in which designers can reduce the negative impacts associated with the life cycle of fashion garments. Including innovative examples of best practice from international designers and brands, these chapters present each key stage in the life cycle of a fashion garment and explore approaches such as low-impact textiles techniques, mono-materiality, zero waste techniques, upcycling, repair and maintenance techniques and closed-loop design systems. A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion offers an overview of the following topics: garment design; sourcing and selecting fabrics and techniques; pattern making and toiling; garment construction; distribution; clothing care and maintenance; reuse and re-manufacture; and material recycling; and it also covers the following sustainable design approaches: design for empathy; using mono materials; zero waste techniques; design for durability; engaging with local communities; design for need; reducing laundering; design for repair; upcycling; and design for closed-loop systems.

57 citations

01 Apr 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore how we might reinvigorate community-based approaches to the repair of clothing and garments and examine the potential roles for online and offline activities to facilitate knowledge exchange, build communities and revisit repair processes and strategies.
Abstract: This paper explores how we might reinvigorate community-based approaches to the repair of clothing and garments and examines the potential roles for online and offline activities to facilitate knowledge exchange, build communities and revisit repair processes and strategies. Until the mid-twentieth century in Western society cloth was considered to be a valuable commodity, and clothes were regularly maintained and repaired to prolong garment use. Today the cultural and economic value attributed to clothing has on the whole dramatically changed and the practice of repairing or altering clothing has largely disappeared. While there is renewed interest in the creative potential of mending or altering garments in some quarters, in particular amongst the online and offline craft communities, within mainstream society damaged clothing is typically discarded to landfill rather than repaired. Based on empirical studies conducted by an interdisciplinary team of researchers at Sheffield Hallam University, this paper discusses the preliminary project findings and suggests what needs to be done to encourage and support people to engage in clothing repair.

26 citations

BookDOI
14 Nov 2014
TL;DR: Fashion Design for Living as discussed by the authors explores the positive contribution that the contemporary fashion designer can make within society and explores new ways of designing and making fashion garments and products that not only enhance and enrich our lives, but also are mindful of social and sustainable issues.
Abstract: Fashion Design for Living explores the positive contribution that the contemporary fashion designer can make within society. The book seeks to reveal new ways of designing and making fashion garments and products that not only enhance and enrich our lives, but also are mindful of social and sustainable issues. This book sets out to question and challenge the dominant, conventional process of fashion design that as a practice has been under-researched. While the fashion designer in industry is primarily concerned with the creation of the new seasonal collection, designed, produced and measured by economic driven factors, society increasingly expects the designer to make a positive contribution to our social, environmental and cultural life. Consequently an emergent set of designers and research-based practitioners are beginning to explore new ways to think about fashion designing. The contributors within the book argue that fashion designing should move beyond developing garments that are just aesthetically pleasing or inexpensive, but also begin to consider and respond to the wearers experiences, wellbeing, problems, desires, situations, and engagement with and use of a garment. The practitioners and researchers that have contributed to this book share different perspectives on how fashion design can support individual and social enhancement. These accounts foreground approaches to fashion design that focus on users, lived experiences, actual and everyday problems or scenarios, which traditionally have remained unfamiliar or aside from the fashion design process applied in industry or in the educational fashion design studio. Fashion Design for Living champion’s new approaches to fashion practice by uncovering a rich and diverse set of views and reflective experiences, which explore the changing role of the fashion designer and inspire fresh, innovative and creative responses to fashion and the world we live in.

17 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors use the sustainable logics of narrowing, slowing and closing the loop of resources used during the production, design, manufacture and distribution of fashion garments to analyse emerging business models that seek to reduce the environmental impact of the fashion system.

137 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a content analysis of the corporate sustainability reports, other documents and web sites of 14 apparel brands belonging to the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC) was conducted to identify indicators related to sustainability.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify the reported indicators in corporate sustainability reports, other documents and the web sites of 14 apparel brands belonging to the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC). Design/methodology/approach – A content analysis of the corporate sustainability reports, other documents and web sites of the 14 SAC apparel brands was conducted to identify indicators related to sustainability. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected on all reported sustainability initiatives, actions, and indicators. A normative business model was developed for the categorization of the indicators and a cross-case analysis of the apparel brand’s sustainability reporting was conducted. Findings – In total, 87 reported corporate sustainability indicators were identified. The study finds that there is a lack of consistency among them. The majority of the indicators dealt with performance in supply-chain sustainability while the least frequently reported indicators addressed busin...

134 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors illustrate how marketers can encourage contemporary consumers to become strongly oriented toward sustainable fashion product consumption (SFPC) by developing and staging memorable consumer-centered experiences that orient consumers toward SFPC encourages the consumers achieving desired balance states.

127 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the concept of fashion remanufacturing, the requirements for a reverse supply chain and the barriers and opportunities that exist for future growth of this sustainable business.
Abstract: Fast changing fashion trends have led to high consumption rates of clothing, shortening of life-spans for many fashion products and increasing amounts of textile waste. Addressing the problems caused by the unsustainable landscape of the fashion industry requires alternative solutions, new business models or whole systems rethink. Fashion remanufacturing is one such strategy that supports material recirculation and thus reduces land filling of fashion waste. This paper examines the concept of fashion remanufacturing, the requirements for a reverse supply chain and the barriers and opportunities that exist for future growth of this sustainable business. The investigation reveals that although collaboration among key players along the reverse supply chain is essential for business growth, the extent of this growth is dependent on the commitment and involvement of large fashion retailers and the fashion consumer. We conclude the paper by considering the implications for the fashion industry if fashion remanufacture were to become a more mainstream business model.

99 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The fashion industry is one of the most wasteful consumer industries in the world as mentioned in this paper, and clothing has evolved from a durable good to a daily purchase in recent years, a framework for a more efficient, closed-loop economy has emerged as a key way forward in the transition to a more sustainable and less wasteful fashion industry.

95 citations