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Aljean Harmetz

Bio: Aljean Harmetz is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Chemistry (relationship) & Monster. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 26 citations.

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01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: Harmetz as mentioned in this paper argues that every movie is a creature built from accidents and blind choices -a mechanical monster constructed of camera angles, the chemistry between actors, too little money or too much and a thousand unintended moments.
Abstract: It is 50 years since "Casablanca" opened up in America Little did Humphrey Bogart know when he uttered the final line - "This could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship" - that he had just closed what would be one of the most enduring and popular movies ever Aljean Harmetz believes that "every movie is a creature built from accidents and blind choices - a mechanical monster constructed of camera angles, the chemistry between actors, too little money or too much and a thousand unintended moments" Her portrait of the making of an unmatched classic reveals some of the accidents: how the stars of the movie almost weren't Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman; how "As Time Goes By" nearly didn't make it to the final cut

24 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the visual representations of refugees across a range of media forms and suggested that these media images have origins in Christian iconography, and then the treatment of forced migration in the fiction film, proposing that cinema representations often conform to the "road movie" genre.
Abstract: The paper takes the form of a broad-based exploration of the visual representations of refugees across a range of media forms. Firstly it suggests that these media images have origins in Christian iconography. Then the discussion considers the treatment of forced migration in the fiction film, proposing that cinema representations often conform to the "road movie" genre. A discussion of contemporary issues in the media representation of refugees points to the necessity and direction for future research on the subject.

102 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the priority should go to the integrated sound track, with all of its stylistic and narrative complexity, and demonstrate this by examining how song performances are placed in the sound track.
Abstract: Writing on film music, whether in the trade-book or academic literatures, has heavily favored symphonic background music over source music. Yet the more fundamental distinction made by industry professionals is between the image track and the sound track. Early in the history of sound film the integrated sound track became an artistic requirement for sound editors; this greater control also facilitated more crossover between musical styles. This essay problematizes the priority of symphonic background music in the early Hollywood cinema. I argue instead that priority should go to the integrated sound track, with all of its stylistic and narrative complexity. I demonstrate this by examining how song performances are placed in the sound track. Examples are drawn from the earliest sound feature films (1927–28), dramatic films and musicals from roughly 1932 to 1936, and Casablanca (1943).

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the potential for theoretical cross-fertilisation between music narratology and screen music studies, drawing on theories of agency and expressive structure from scholars including Carolyn Abbate and Robert Hatten.
Abstract: Serious screen music studies have been underway for over twenty years, with the analysis and critical interpretation of music's role in audio-visual narratives a key concern. However, the advanced and theoretically grounded tools of music narratology have not yet, on the whole, played a significant role in screen music studies. This paper examines the potential for theoretical cross-fertilisation between these fields. Its analytical discussions of Casablanca and Mystic River draw on theories of agency and expressive structure from scholars including Carolyn Abbate and Robert Hatten, in the context of broader considerations of interpretation, ideology, and narrative.

14 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The cold war was characterized as a Manichaean struggle between "good" and "evil" in stark national, religious and racial terms as mentioned in this paper, and a new foe quickly took the place of Soviet communism in the imagination of many Americans.
Abstract: COLD WAR ROOTS OF 1990s ARABPHOBIA With the end of the cold war, a new foe quickly took the place of Soviet communism in the imagination of many Americans. Much of the same energy that animated Americans' fear of the \"red\" menace (the allegedly inexorable and atheistic plot for world domination on the part of the Soviets) shifted during the 1990s to panic in response to the \"green\" terror (the unpredictable use of terrorism by militant Islamic fundamentalists).2 The fear of usually unseen terrorists vaguely and sbirietimës erroneously described as \"Arab\" recurs in many of the same forms used to express the paranoia of Soviet invasion. As during the red scare of the late 1940s and 1950s, the phobia of Islamic terrorism is intensified by the impossibility of locating a single source and thereby containing it. Individual citizens imagine collaborators everywhere and redefine \"un-Americanness\" in terms of ethnic and religious difference, supposed pillars of American tolerance. The impulse to put a nationality, an ethnicity, a religion or a race on the work of scattered individuals, and to hold the millions more who share some of those identities equally responsible for the crimes of the few seems an impulse left over from the cold war, which was characterized as a Manichaean struggle between \"good\" and \"evil\" in stark national, religious and racial terms.

14 citations