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Allan Hoben

Bio: Allan Hoben is an academic researcher from Boston University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Government & Environmental impact assessment. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 201 citations.

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Allan Hoben1
TL;DR: In the wake of the 1985 famine, the Ethiopian government launched an ambitious program of environmental reclamation supported by donors and nongovernment organizations and backed by the largest food-for-work program in Africa.

180 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A reevaluation of the work of Edward Shils and Clifford Geertz, and an examination of recent developments in anthropology and history suggest new ways in which the dynamic role of cultural and symbolic processes in development can be understood as discussed by the authors.

22 citations


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TL;DR: The use of indigenous knowledge has been seen by many as an alternative way of promoting development in poor rural communities in many parts of the world as mentioned in this paper. But, as pointed out by as mentioned in this paper, a number of problems and tensions has resulted in indigenous knowledge not being as useful as hoped for or supposed, such as a focus on the (arte)factual, binary tensions between western science and indigenous knowledge systems, the problem of differentiation and power relations, the romanticization of the indigenous knowledge, and the all too frequent decontextualization of knowledge.
Abstract: The use of indigenous knowledge has been seen by many as an alternative way of promoting development in poor rural communities in many parts of the world. By reviewing much of the recent work on indigenous knowledge, the paper suggests that a number of problems and tensions has resulted in indigenous knowledge not being as useful as hoped for or supposed. These include problems emanating from a focus on the (arte)factual; binary tensions between western science and indigenous knowledge systems; the problem of differentiation and power relations; the romanticization of indigenous knowledge; and the all too frequent decontextualization of indigenous knowledge.

433 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate peoples' perception of climate variability, cli- mate change and drought frequency and compare it with measurements of rainfall variability and anomalies in northern Ethiopia.
Abstract: The rationale of this paper is to investigate peoples' perception of climate variability, cli- mate change and drought frequency and compare it with measurements of rainfall variability and anomalies in northern Ethiopia. Statistical analysis of rainfall chronologies was performed and con- trasted with qualitative data collected through a survey and questionnaires. Fieldwork studies showed that local authorities, farmers and pastoralists perceived regional climate to have changed during the last few decades. Farmers explained that they have been changing their farming strate- gies by shifting to more drought-resistant crops as well as to a shorter agricultural calendar. They attributed this to a loss of the spring rains since 'their father's time' (20-30 yr ago), as well as a shorter main summer wet period. The recent 2002 drought appears to have confirmed peoples' perceptions that there has been a shift in climate towards more unfavourable conditions. However, rainfall measurements do not show a downward trend in rainfall. Reasons for divergence between per- ceptions and rainfall measurements were explored. Some can be associated with changes in peoples' need for rainfall or be linked to various environmental changes which cause reduced water avail- ability. Others can be related to the paucity of available daily data in a dense station network which could better support peoples' perceptions of change. In exploring these reasons, focus was given to the disagreement between optimal rainfall (i.e. amount and distribution sufficient for crop or pasture growth) and normal rainfall (i.e. the long-term statistical mean and its variation).

284 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors introduce development theory and environment in an Age of Market Triumphalism, and present a survey of the current state of the art in the field of environment and development.
Abstract: (1993). Introduction: Development Theory and Environment in an Age of Market Triumphalism. Economic Geography: Vol. 69, Theme Issue: Environment and Development, Part 1, pp. 227-253.

281 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider two concise, high profile valuation papers, by Peters and colleagues and by Godoy and colleagues, and illustrate a series of questions that should be asked, not only about the two papers, but also about any landscape valuation study.
Abstract: The methods used to value tropical forests have the potential to influence how policy makers and others perceive forest landsforestlands. A small number of valuation studies achieve real impact. These are generally succinct accounts supporting a specific perception. However, such reports risk being used to justify inappropriate actions. The end users of such results are rarely those who produced them and misunderstanding of key details is a concern. One defence is to ensure that the ultimate users appreciate shortcomings and common pitfalls. In this article, the authors aim to reduce such risks by discussing how valuation studies should be assessed and challenged by users. The authors consider two concise, high profile valuation papers here, by Peters and colleagues and by Godoy and colleagues. They illustrate a series of questions that should be asked, not only about the two papers, but also about any landscape valuation study. The article highlighted the many challenges faced in valuing tropical forest landsforestlands and in presenting and using results sensibly, and it offers some suggestions for improvement. Attention to compexitiescomplexities and clarity about uncertainties are required. Forest valuation must be pursued and promoted with caution.

245 citations