scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Alphonso Groenewald

Other affiliations: Union Pacific Railroad
Bio: Alphonso Groenewald is an academic researcher from University of Pretoria. The author has contributed to research in topics: Old Testament & Hebrew Bible. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 51 publications receiving 240 citations. Previous affiliations of Alphonso Groenewald include Union Pacific Railroad.


Papers
More filters
Book
18 Nov 2003
TL;DR: Groenewald et al. as mentioned in this paper integrated valid exegetical methods with the objective to determine Psalm 69's structure, its developmental layers as well as its compositional function within the Psalter.
Abstract: "At the beginning of the twenty-first century, scholarship on the Psalms is faced with the fundamental methodological challenge of combining a synchronic and a diachronic textual reading. In this light, the author has integrated valid exegetical methods with the objective to determine Psalm 69's structure, its developmental layers as well as its compositional function within the Psalter. This analysis of the literary microcosmos of Psalm 69, within its macrocosmos, has led to new results as well as a new understanding of the text of this psalm. The Psalms have always been of central importance in the scholarly study of the Old Testament. Following in this tradition, the author has both challenged and confirmed some of the results of earlier scholarship. Alphonso Groenewald (* 1969) is currently a postdoctoral fellow in Old Testament Studies at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. He worked as a researcher at the University of Nijmegen (the Netherlands) for three and a half years. "

23 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The role of the eschatological messenger in the context of the Day of Yahweh in the Book of the Twelve prophets is discussed in this article, where the authors introduce three urgent issues: the need for messianic intervention, the need of the day of judgement, and the need to social justice.
Abstract: The theme of the Day of Yahweh is regarded as a central feature of the prophets' message to their contemporaries. It is the most striking and prominent theme in the Book of the Twelve. While Isaiah focuses on Zion, Jeremiah on the rhetoric of lament, Ezekiel on the Glory of Yahweh, so are the Minor Prophets on the theme of the Day of Yahweh. The Day of Yahweh as envisioned by Malachi is an eschatological day of judgement with a future day of renewal and restoration of the fortunes of those who fear the Lord. Malachi's vision for restoration includes a covenantal messenger, who will cleanse Yahweh's people and restore true worship and obedience to the ethical standards of the law thus giving room for a community of reverence who will enjoy righteousness and healing. Earlier Malachi had castigated the priests and people for their attitude and actions toward sacrifices and the altar. Now in the light of the lawlessness alluded to in 2:17, the corruption of the priesthood in 3:3, the inadequacy of worship in 3:4 and the corruption of personal and civil morality in 3:5, readers are introduced to three urgent issues: the need for messianic intervention, the need for the day of judgement and the need for social justice. In the discussions that follow, this article examines eschatological hope in the OT, the eschatological peculiarity of the discourse of Malachi's Day of Yahweh, the identity of Malachi's eschatological covenant messenger, the roles of the eschatological messenger: namely, cultic restoration and Yahweh's righting of past wrongs and the reversal of sinful societal order in the overall context of the eschatological day of Yahweh.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the book of Malachi as mentioned in this paper, Malachi pointed out that it is the sins of the community as a whole that render it inconceivable that Yahweh's blessings should attend to them as they are now, and Malachi demands certain definite and substantial actions as preconditions to the manifestation of the desired expectations.
Abstract: This article focuses on Malachi’s distinctive claims that guarantee a well-ordered community, namely the validity and feasibility of a Torah -compliant community. Since Torah compliance is a fundamental core of Israel’s life, in the book of Malachi, Yahweh’s Torah functions as the reliable and invariable authority for the community well-being as a whole. Community well-being as pictured by Malachi is created not only by Yahweh but also as the consequent contemplation and action of community. Malachi notes clearly that it is the sins of the community as a whole that renders it inconceivable that Yahweh’s blessings should attend to them as they are now, and Malachi demands certain definite and substantial actions as preconditions to the manifestation of the desired expectations. To him the secret of creating and maintaining a healthy, viable community and living as people in covenant relationship with Yahweh, is by ‘remembering’ (upholding and practicing) Yahweh’s Torah . Accordingly, Malachi enjoined his audience to remember the Torah of Moses, which constitutes the fundamental dimensions of their relationship with Yahweh. This article is thus an attempt to understand Malachi’s concept of a Torah -compliant community and its associated blessings of happiness and shalom.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argued that society even today could benefit from the richness of the ethics of the Hebrew Bible, arguing that there is a need for a comprehensive ethical view by which one can combine a solid religious foundation, including responsibility towards God, the Creator and Lord of life, with a broad human wisdom gained from a rational understanding of the circumstances of existence for a true human life in a created world of order.
Abstract: This article argued that society even today could benefit from the richness of the ethics of the Hebrew Bible. Isaiah 1:2–3 has been used as an example to illustrate the ethics of a biblical text. This text has wisdom traits and literary links with Deuteronomy 32. In a modern, pluralistic society there is a need for a comprehensive ethical view by which one can combine a solid religious foundation, including responsibility towards God, the Creator and Lord of life, with a broad human wisdom gained from a rational understanding of the circumstances of existence for a true human life in a created world of order.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that there are similarities between the ideas of the ancient wisdom writers of Job and Ecclesiastes and more recent postmodern thinkers, and pointed out that such similarities are a clear indication of the meaningful role which Old Testament wisdom, or wisdom in revolt for that matter, can play in current intellectual and theological debates.
Abstract: This article will be concerned with the question whether the books of Job and Ecclesiastes can be viewed as (postmodern) wisdom in revolt or not. Three questions underlie this title: firstly, are the books of Job and Ecclesiastes wisdom books? Secondly, if so, is their wisdom revolutionary in nature? And thirdly, are there any similarities between the thoughts of Job and Ecclesiastes on the one hand and that of postmodern thinkers on the other hand? It will be argued that there are various similarities to be cited between the ideas of the ancient wisdom writers of Job and Ecclesiastes and more recent postmodern thinkers. This does not, however, necessarily justify a postmodern tag for the books of Job and Ecclesiastes, but points to a similarity in thought development between the ancient societies of Job and Ecclesiastes and the present-day societies. Such similarities are viewed as a clear indication of the meaningful role which Old Testament wisdom, or wisdom in revolt for that matter, can play in current intellectual and theological debates.

11 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Postmodern Music, Postmodern Listening collection as mentioned in this paper explores a wide range of modern understandings of Buddhism and questions if secular Buddhism is purely a Western invention, offering a timely contribution to an ever-evolving discussion.
Abstract: Examines various industries to show how business endows products with evocative meaning. Kramer was one of the most visionary musical thinkers of the second half of the 20th century. In his The Time of Music, he approached the idea of the many different ways that time itself is articulated musically. This book has become influential among composers, theorists, and aestheticians. Now, in his almost completed text written before his untimely death in 2004, he examines the concept of postmodernism in music. Kramer created a series of markers by which we can identify postmodern works. He suggests that the postmodern project actually creates a radically different relationship between the composer and listener. Written with wit, precision, and at times playfully subverting traditional tropes to make a very serious point about this difference, Postmodern Music, Postmodern Listening leads us to a strongly grounded intellectual basis for stylistic description and an intuitive sensibility of what postmodernism in music entails. Postmodern Music, Postmodern Listening is an examination of how musical postmodernism is not just a style or movement, but a fundamental shift in the relationship between composer and listener. The result is a multifaceted and provocative look at a critical turning point in music history, one whose implications we are only just beginning to understand. A timely essay collection on the development and influence of secular expressions of Buddhism in the West and beyond. How do secular values impact Buddhism in the modern world? What versions of Buddhism are being transmitted to the West? Is it possible to know whether an interpretation of the Buddha’s words is correct? In this new essay collection, opposing ideas that often define Buddhist communities—secular versus religious, modern versus traditional, Western versus Eastern—are unpacked and critically examined. These reflections by contemporary scholars and practitioners reveal the dynamic process of reinterpreting and reimagining Buddhism in secular contexts, from the mindfulness movement to Buddhist shrine displays in museums, to whether rebirth is an essential belief. This collection explores a wide range of modern understandings of Buddhism—whether it is considered a religion, philosophy, or lifestyle choice—and questions if secular Buddhism is purely a Western invention, offering a timely contribution to an ever-evolving discussion. Contributors include Bhikkhu Bodhi, Kate Crosby, Gil Fronsdal, Kathleen Gregory, Funie Hsu, Roger R. Jackson, Charles B. Jones, David L. McMahan, Richard K. Payne, Ron Purser, Sarah Shaw, Philippe Turenne, and Pamela D. Winfield. `I judge this book to be something of a triumph. It provides many valuable insights into how social psychologists work within different paradigms and with quite different assumptions.... Throughout, the writing is clear, central issues are constantly reexamined, and sight is never lost of the whole \"task\" of the book... it addresses central issues both adventurously and provocatively. Students who use it are lucky to have such a feast provided, and they are bound to find the material both challenging and stimulating... there is much more about self issues in this text than in any comparable social psychology text. And that, in itself, is a major achievement' Self & Society This accessible, broad-based and a

1,263 citations

01 Dec 2006
TL;DR: In this article, NAFU SA and other role players expressed some criticism about government programmes. The criticism was not so much about the objectives and content of these programmes, but rather about their accessibility, or lack thereof, to emerging farmers.
Abstract: Recently NAFU SA and other role players expressed some criticism about government programmes. The criticism was not so much about the objectives and content of these programmes, but rather about their accessibility, or lack thereof, to emerging farmers.

819 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Not everyone will respond to the same treatments, and most will require a combination to recover, but Dr van der Kolk laments how clinicians often spend more time managing problem behaviors than trying to understand their causes.
Abstract: For the large number of people who are still suffering from the effects of trauma, despite the tremendous advances in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) made in the last 20 years, this book offers new insights into psychopathology and recovery. Part scholarly review, part case series, part history, part philosophy, and part memoirs, Dr van der Kolk uses anecdotes elegantly to illustrate evidence-based concepts in a way that patients can grasp yet experts will not find simplistic. Providers, patients, and families will inevitably find that the science and stories resonate with their own experiences. Like all great innovations, this book builds on past innovations. Seemingly unrelated neuroimaging, neurochemistry, endocrinology, animal studies, attachment, interpersonal, psychodynamic, cognitive, and behavioral concepts are woven together, creating an intricate but coherent, unifying tapestry that helps reveal how trauma can change survivors. Freud and Pavlov are referenced alongside films, novels, Galen, and Yogi Berra. Contradictions that have long mystified observers—simultaneously not wanting but needing to talk about trauma, coming alive in the present only when recounting the past, repetition compulsions, maintaining connections with abusers, recklessness resulting in calmness, finding pain in pleasure and pleasure in pain, avoiding treatment for fear recovery will result in forgetting dead comrades, reacting to minor irritations as if life-threatening yet having little apparent reaction to further assaults— suddenly become clearer. Just as he explains how trauma can disturb circuits, hormones, sensorimotor systems, and “how we think and what we think about,” van der Kolk describes how these can be recalibrated. He defines 3 avenues for recovery: “top down” through the medial prefrontal cortex (ie, talking, processing, reconnecting), medicine changing the way the brain organizes and reacts to stimuli, and “bottom up” through the “reptilian brain” (ie, the body having experiences that contradict the physical and emotional impacts of trauma). Not everyone will respond to the same treatments, and most will require a combination to recover. He laments how clinicians often spend more time managing problem behaviors than trying to understand their causes. For some, medications can “deflect attention from dealing with underlying issues” and from relationships, and only talking about trauma can sometimes be counterproductive due to reinforcing a focus on the past instead of the present, or is thwarted by triggering dissociation (his neuroimaging studies found that the brain’s speech centers deactivate in some when trying to recall trauma, making it nearly impossible for this subset of traumatized patients to talk about the trauma). The book pays particular attention to those for whom typical treatments may not be effective: those who freeze, dissociate, have personality disorders, suffer physical collapse, and who have persistent heartbreaking and gut-wrenching sensations as “the body continues to defend against a threat that belongs in the past.” For them, “the body needs to learn that the danger has passed and to live in the reality of the present.” In addition to typical Marcia L. Verduin, MD, Book Editor

314 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Theology of the Old Testament as discussed by the authors is the most complete volume on the subject in English, or perhaps in any language, and it is a book that one takes up with enthusiastic anticipation of pleasure and profit in reading it, but one lays it down with a feeling of disappointment.
Abstract: Professor Davidson was one of the greatest Old Testament scholars of our generation. His Hebrew Grammar is the best student's manual in the field. His commentaries on Job, Ezekiel, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah in the Cambridge Bible are masterpieces of exposition. His articles in the Encyclopedia Britannica, in Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible, and in numerous theological and critical reviews are epoch-making contributions to the study of the Old Testament. From his classroom have gone out such famous scholars as Robertson Smith, George Adam Smith, Elmslie, Thomson, and Skinner. To his quiet influence is mainly due the general adoption by the Free Church of Scotland of modern critical views in regard to the Old Testament. It was with great satisfaction, therefore, that we learned a number of years ago that he had promised to write the volume on Old Testament theology in the International Theological Library. We have looked forward eagerly for the appearance of this book, and have anticipated that, when it appeared, it would be the greatest work on the subject in English, or perhaps in any language. When we heard of the author's death in I902, we were grieved to think that this longexpected volume would probably never be finished; but were presently comforted by the news that the manuscript had been left nearly complete and would soon be published under the able editorship of Principal Salmond. Dr. Salmond has at last completed his arduous labor of love in collecting and editing the notes left by his friend, and the result lies before us in this Theology of the Old Testament.' It is a book that one takes up with enthusiastic anticipation of pleasure and profit in reading it, but one lays it down with a keen feeling of disappointment. The material in it may all be Davidson's, but we miss the masterly power of co-ordination that is seen in his earlier writings. Apparently his notes were left in a scattered, fragmentary form, and the editor, who is not an Old Testament critic, was not able to fit them into a consistent

209 citations