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Ampara Aramcharoen

Other affiliations: University of Manchester
Bio: Ampara Aramcharoen is an academic researcher from Agency for Science, Technology and Research. The author has contributed to research in topics: Machining & Tool steel. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 23 publications receiving 1143 citations. Previous affiliations of Ampara Aramcharoen include University of Manchester.

Papers
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TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed a new model and methodology for optimising the energy footprint for a machined product, where the total energy of machining a component by the turning process was modelled and optimised to derive an economic tool-life that satisfies the minimum energy footprint requirement.

389 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the size effect in micromilling hardened tool steel was observed by studying the effect of the ratio of undeformed chip thickness to the cutting edge radius on process performance, and how this ratio drove the specific cutting force, surface finish and burr formation in micro-scale machining.
Abstract: The market for freeform and high quality microdies and moulds made of steel is predicted to experience a phenomenal growth in line with the demand for microsystems. However, micromachining of hardened steel is a challenge due to unpredictable tool life and likely differences in process mechanism compared to macro-scale machining. This paper presents an investigation of the size effect in micromilling of H13 hardened tool steel. In this case, the size effect in micromilling hardened tool steel was observed by studying the effect of the ratio of undeformed chip thickness to the cutting edge radius on process performance. The paper explores how this ratio drives the specific cutting force, surface finish and burr formation in micro-scale machining. In addition, the effect of different microend mill geometry on product quality was explored. The paper provides a valuable insight into optimum micro-scale machining conditions for obtaining the best surface finish and minimizing burr size.

306 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a wide range of PVD coatings were evaluated based on multiple criteria of tool wear, surface finish and burr size, and the results clearly show that compared to other coatings or uncoated fine grain carbide tools, TiN coatings offer the best performance in terms of tools wear reduction and improvement in quality of machined surface.
Abstract: In conventional or macroscale milling, appropriate physical vapour deposition (PVD) coatings can be used to improve machining performance, promote the use of higher cutting speeds and facilitate dry machining or the use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL). When micro tools (1–999 μm in diameter) are used in milling, the undeformed chip thickness is usually very small and comparable to the cutting edge radius. This condition determines the effective rake angle and hence plays a significant role in the mechanics of micro machining. The differences between macro and microscale machining influence process factors such as cutting interface temperatures, forces, strains and strain rates. The mechanisms through which coatings protect cutting tools are influenced by such process conditions. Additionally, due to the size of micro tools applying coatings evenly around the cutting edges is a technological challenge. Despite these new challenges, there is hardly any work reported in literature dedicated to the selection of hard coatings for micro machining of tool steels. The work reported in this paper identified coating wear mechanisms in micro milling of hardened tool steels. A wide range of PVD coatings were evaluated based on multiple criteria of tool wear, surface finish and burr size. The results clearly show that compared to other coatings or uncoated fine grain carbide tools, TiN coatings offer the best performance in terms of tool wear reduction and improvement in quality of machined surface.

153 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a comprehensive information on energy intensity in machining process, including the influence of tool wear, was studied, and key energy states were identified to build up an energy demand for machining components.

139 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of cryogenic cooling on milling of Inconel 718 as compared to dry and conventional oil-based coolant was investigated, and the results demonstrated that the use of conventional oil based coolant could be ineffective and non sustainable for cutting this material.

78 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This tutorial review offers protocols, tips, insight, and considerations for practitioners interested in using micromilling to create microfluidic devices to provide a potential user with information to guide them on whethermicromilling would fill a specific need within their overall fabrication strategy.
Abstract: This tutorial review offers protocols, tips, insight, and considerations for practitioners interested in using micromilling to create microfluidic devices. The objective is to provide a potential user with information to guide them on whether micromilling would fill a specific need within their overall fabrication strategy. Comparisons are made between micromilling and other common fabrication methods for plastics in terms of technical capabilities and cost. The main discussion focuses on “how-to” aspects of micromilling, to enable a user to select proper equipment and tools, and obtain usable microfluidic parts with minimal start-up time and effort. The supplementary information provides more extensive discussion on CNC mill setup, alignment, and programming. We aim to reach an audience with minimal prior experience in milling, but with strong interests in fabrication of microfluidic devices.

409 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the state-of-the-art on various surface integrity characteristics during machining of nickel-based super alloys are presented, including surface roughness, defects (surface cavities, metal debris, plucking, smeared material, redeposited material, cracked carbide particles, feed marks, grooves and laps).
Abstract: Nickel-based super alloys are gaining more significance, now-a-days, with extensive applications in aerospace, marine, nuclear reactor and chemical industries. Several characteristics including superior mechanical and chemical properties at elevated temperature, high toughness and ductility, high melting point, excellent resistance to corrosion, thermal shocks, thermal fatigue and erosion are primarily responsible for wide domain of application. Nevertheless, machined surface integrity of nickel-based super alloys is a critical aspect which influences functional performance including fatigue life of the component. This review paper presents state-of-the-art on various surface integrity characteristics during machining of nickel-based super alloys. Influence of various cutting parameters, cutting environment, coating, wear and edge geometry of cutting tools on different features of surface integrity has been critically explained. These characteristics encompass surface roughness, defects (surface cavities, metal debris, plucking, smeared material, redeposited material, cracked carbide particles, feed marks, grooves and laps), metallurgical aspects in the form of surface and sub-surface microstructure phase transformation, dynamic recrystallisation and grain refinement and mechanical characteristics such as work hardening and residual stress. Microstructural modification of deformed layer, profile of residual stresses and their influence on fatigue durability have been given significant emphasis. Future research endeavour might focus on development of new grades, advanced processing techniques of the same to ensure their superior stability of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties along with advanced manufacturing processes like additive manufacturing to achieve highest level of fatigue durability of safety critical components while maintaining acceptable surface integrity and productivity.

403 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of the recent advances in high performance cutting of aerospace alloys and composite currently used in aeroengine and aerostructure applications is presented in this paper, focusing on the role of hybrid machining processes and cooling strategies (MQL, high pressure coolant, cryogenic) on machining performance.
Abstract: This paper presents an overview of the recent advances in high performance cutting of aerospace alloys and composite currently used in aeroengine and aerostructure applications. Progress in cutting tool development and its effect on tool wear and surface integrity characteristics of difficult to machine materials such as nickel based alloys, titanium and composites is presented. Further, advances in cutting technologies are discussed, focusing on the role of hybrid machining processes and cooling strategies (MQL, high pressure coolant, cryogenic) on machining performance. Finally, industrial perspectives are provided in the context of machining specific components where future challenges are discussed.

388 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Lirong Zhou1, Jianfeng Li1, Fangyi Li1, Qiang Meng1, Jing Li1, Xingshuo Xu1 
TL;DR: In this article, a comprehensive literature review is needed because some related concepts are not clear and the precision of models still need to be promoted in this field, and conclusions are drawn for the future study in two major points: 1) the accuracy of current energy consumption models could be improved through introducing the correlation analysis of machine tools, parts, tools and processing condition.

331 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the state-of-the-art in sustainable manufacturing can be found in this paper, where several challenges relevant to manufacturing process and system research, development, implementation, and education are highlighted.
Abstract: Karl R. Haapala 1 School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, 204 Rogers Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 e-mail: Karl.Haapala@oregonstate.edu Fu Zhao School of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907 e-mail: fzhao@purdue.edu Jaime Camelio Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 235 Durham Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061 e-mail: jcamelio@vt.edu John W. Sutherland Division of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Purdue University, 322 Potter Engineering Center, West Lafayette, IN 47907 e-mail: jwsuther@purdue.edu Steven J. Skerlos Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 e-mail: skerlos@umich.edu David A. Dornfeld Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6143 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 e-mail: dornfeld@berkeley.edu I. S. Jawahir Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky, 414C UK Center for Manufacturing, Lexington, KY 40506 e-mail: jawahir@engr.uky.edu A Review of Engineering Research in Sustainable Manufacturing Sustainable manufacturing requires simultaneous consideration of economic, environmen- tal, and social implications associated with the production and delivery of goods. Funda- mentally, sustainable manufacturing relies on descriptive metrics, advanced decision- making, and public policy for implementation, evaluation, and feedback. In this paper, recent research into concepts, methods, and tools for sustainable manufacturing is explored. At the manufacturing process level, engineering research has addressed issues related to planning, development, analysis, and improvement of processes. At a manufac- turing systems level, engineering research has addressed challenges relating to facility operation, production planning and scheduling, and supply chain design. Though economi- cally vital, manufacturing processes and systems have retained the negative image of being inefficient, polluting, and dangerous. Industrial and academic researchers are re- imagining manufacturing as a source of innovation to meet society’s future needs by under- taking strategic activities focused on sustainable processes and systems. Despite recent developments in decision making and process- and systems-level research, many chal- lenges and opportunities remain. Several of these challenges relevant to manufacturing process and system research, development, implementation, and education are highlighted. [DOI: 10.1115/1.4024040] Andres F. Clarens Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Virginia, D220 Thornton Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22904 e-mail: aclarens@virginia.edu Jeremy L. Rickli Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 217 Durham Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061 e-mail: jlrickli@vt.edu Corresponding author. Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the J OURNAL OF M ANUFACTURING S CIENCE AND E NGINEERING . Manuscript received July 11, 2012; final manuscript received March 4, 2013; published online July 17, 2013. Editor: Y. Lawrence Yao. Manufacturing and Sustainability The concept of sustainability emerged from a series of meetings and reports in the 1970s and 1980s, and was largely motivated by environmental incidents and disasters as well as fears about Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering C 2013 by ASME Copyright V AUGUST 2013, Vol. 135 / 041013-1 Downloaded From: http://manufacturingscience.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/ on 07/09/2014 Terms of Use: http://asme.org/terms

328 citations