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André Normandeau

Bio: André Normandeau is an academic researcher from Université de Montréal. The author has contributed to research in topics: Community policing & Prison. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 44 publications receiving 404 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The relationship between crime and the physical environment is mediated through individual awareness and action spaces as discussed by the authors, and crime is strongly related to aggregate elements of the perceived physical environment: nodes, paths, edges and an environmental backcloth.

825 citations

Book
20 Nov 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview of the modern mixed regime with respect to the sense of powerlessness and symbols of depoliticization, and the preference for judgement.
Abstract: Preface Introduction Part I. Overseeing Democracy: 1. Vigilance, denunciation, evaluation 2. The overseers 3. The thread of history 4. Legitimacy conflicts Part II. The Sovereignty of Prevention: 5. From the right of resistance to complex sovereignty 6. Self-critical democracies 7. Negative politics Part III. The People as Judge: 8. Historical references 9. Almost legislators 10. The preference for judgement Part IV. Unpolitical Democracy: 11. The sense of powerlessness and symbols of depoliticization 12. The populist temptation 13. Lessons of unpolitical economy 14. Conclusion: the modern mixed regime.

454 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that moral commitments and identity affirmation should not be reduced to cost-benefit calculations because doing so denies the social origins of collectivistic motivation, and masks the potential importance of these factors in explanations of collective action.
Abstract: This paper argues for the further development of work motivation theories to include better links between the individual and the collectivity, in order to more adequately explain individual contributions to collective work efforts. Three co-determinants of collectivistic work motivation are discussed: calculative considerations, moral commitments, and the affirmation of identities. It is argued that perceived collective efficacy and social rewards and sanctions should be given a central place in calculative models of collectivistic work motivation. It is further argued that moral commitments and identity affirmation should not be reduced to cost-benefit calculations because doing so denies the social origins of collectivistic motivation, and masks the potential importance of these factors in explanations of collective action.

376 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although the overall set of relations does not satisfy mediation requirements fully in all instances, the model was validated for the most part, supporting a focus on a multilevel ecological model of influences on risk development.
Abstract: Data from a longitudinal study of 294 African American and Latino adolescent boys and their caregivers living in poor urban communities were used to test a developmental-ecological model of violence. Six annual waves of data were applied to evaluate the relations between microsystem influences of parenting and peer deviance (peer violence and gang membership), macrosystem influences of community structural characteristics and neighborhood social organization, and individual involvement in violence (level and growth). Structural equation modeling analyses showed that community structural characteristics significantly predicted neighborhood social processes. Parenting practices partially mediated the relation between neighborhood social processes and gang membership. Parenting practices was fully mediated in its relation to peer violence by gang membership. Gang membership was partially mediated by peer violence level in its relation to individual violence level. Although the overall set of relations does not satisfy mediation requirements fully in all instances, the model was validated for the most part, supporting a focus on a multilevel ecological model of influences on risk development.

282 citations