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Andreas Huyssen

Bio: Andreas Huyssen is an academic researcher from Columbia University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Modernism (music) & Postmodernism. The author has an hindex of 24, co-authored 77 publications receiving 5539 citations.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present pasts : media, politics, amnesia, monumental seduction, Christo in Berlin, the voids of Berlin, Berlin as palimpsest, fear of mice, after-images of nine/eleven.
Abstract: Present pasts : media, politics, amnesia -- Monumental seduction : Christo in Berlin -- The voids of Berlin -- After the war : Berlin as palimpsest -- Fear of mice : the Times Square redevelopment -- Memory sites in an expanded field : the memory park in Buenos Aires -- Doris Salcedo's memory sculpture Unland : the orphan's tunic -- Of mice and mimesis : reading Spiegelman with Adorno -- Rewritings and new beginnings : W.G. Sebald and the literature on the air war -- Twin memories : after-images of nine/eleven.

1,101 citations

Book
28 Dec 1994
TL;DR: In a recent collection of essays on memory and amnesia in the postmodern world, cultural critic Andreas Huyssen considers how nationalism, literature, art, politics, and the media are obsessed with the past as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In this new collection of essays on memory and amnesia in the postmodern world, cultural critic Andreas Huyssen considers how nationalism, literature, art, politics, and the media are obsessed with the past. The great paradox of our fin-de-siecle culture is that novelty is even more associated with memory than with future expectation. Drawing heavily on the dilemmas of contemporary Germany, Huyssen's discussion of cultural memory illustrates the nature of contemporary nationalism, the work of such artists and thinkers as Anselm Kiefer, Alexander Kluge, and Jean Baudrillard, and many others. The book includes illustrations from contemporary Germany.

797 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, the authors argues that the focus of post-war modernist culture has shifted from present futures to present pasts, and this shift in the experience and sensibility of time needs to be explained historically and phenomenologically.
Abstract: ne of the most surprising cultural and political phenomena of recent years has been the emergence of memory as a key concern in Western societies, a turning toward the past that stands in stark contrast to the privileging of the future so characteristic of earlier decades of twentieth-century modernity. From the early twentieth century’s apocalyptic myths of radical breakthrough and the emergence of the “new man” in Europe via the murderous phantasms of racial or class purification in National Socialism and Stalinism to the post–World War II American paradigm of modernization, modernist culture was energized by what one might call “present futures.”1 Since the 1980s, it seems, the focus has shifted from present futures to present pasts, and this shift in the experience and sensibility of time needs to be explained historically and phenomenologically.2 But the contemporary focus on memory and temporality also stands in stark contrast to so much other recent innovative work on categories of space, maps, geographies, borders, trade routes, migrations, displacements, and diasporas in the context of postcolonial and cultural studies. Indeed, not so long ago there was a widespread consensus in the United States that in order to understand postmodern culture, the focus had to be shifted from the problematics of time and

405 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

319 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: The Uses of Heritage as mentioned in this paper explores the use of heritage throughout the world and argues that heritage value is not inherent in physical objects or places, but rather that these objects and places are used to give tangibility to the values that underpin different communities and to assert and affirm these values.
Abstract: Examining international case studies including USA, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Laurajane Smith identifies and explores the use of heritage throughout the world. Challenging the idea that heritage value is self-evident, and that things must be preserved because they have an inherent importance, Smith forcefully demonstrates that heritage value is not inherent in physical objects or places, but rather that these objects and places are used to give tangibility to the values that underpin different communities and to assert and affirm these values. A practically grounded accessible examination of heritage as a cultural practice, The Uses of Heritage is global in its benefit to students and field professionals alike.

2,516 citations

Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: In Pursuit of the Postmodern Theories of Consumer Culture Towards a Sociology of Postmodern Culture Postmodernism, Cultural Change and Social Practice as discussed by the authors, postmodernism and the Aestheticization of Everyday Life Lifestyle and Consumer Culture City Cultures and Postmodern Lifestyles
Abstract: Preface In Pursuit of the Postmodern Theories of Consumer Culture Towards a Sociology of Postmodern Culture Postmodernism, Cultural Change and Social Practice Postmodernism and the Aestheticization of Everyday Life Lifestyle and Consumer Culture City Cultures and Postmodern Lifestyles Postmodernism, Consumer Culture and Global Disorder Common Culture or Uncommon Cultures?

2,215 citations

Book
04 Apr 1996
TL;DR: Hall and Donald as discussed by the authors discuss the history of identity in a short history from Pilgrim to tourist, from Tourist to Tourist, and the role of identity as a marker of identity.
Abstract: Introduction - Stuart Hall Who Needs 'Identity'? From Pilgrim to Tourist - or a Short History of Identity - Zygmunt Bauman Enabling Identity? - Marilyn Strathern Biology, Choice and the New Reproductive Technologies Culture's In-Between - Homi K Bhabha Interrupting Identities - Kevin Robins Turkey/Europe Identity and Cultural Studies - Is That All There Is? - Lawrence Grossberg Music and Identity - Simon Frith Identity, Genealogy, History - Nikolas Rose Organizing Identity - Paul du Gay Entrepreneurial Governance and Public Management The Citizen and the Man about Town - James Donald

2,090 citations

Book
23 Nov 1995
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on youth cultures that revolve around dance clubs and raves in Great Britain and the U.S. and highlight the values of authenticity and hipness and explore the complex hierarchies that emerge within the domain of popular culture.
Abstract: Focusing on youth cultures that revolve around dance clubs and raves in Great Britain and the U.S., Sarah Thornton highlights the values of authenticity and hipness and explores the complex hierarchies that emerge within the domain of popular culture. She portrays club cultures as "taste cultures" brought together by micro-media like flyers and listings, transformed into self-conscious "subcultures" by such niche media as the music and style press, and sometimes recast as "movements" with the aid of such mass media as tabloid newspaper front pages. She also traces changes in the recording medium from a marginal entertainment in the 50s to the clubs and raves of the 90s. Drawing on the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Thornton coins the term "subcultural capital" to make sense of distinctions made by "cool" youth, noting particularly their disparagement of the "mainstream" against which they measure their alternative cultural worth. Well supported with case studies, readable, and innovative, Club Cultures will become a key text in cultural and media studies and in the sociology of culture.

1,964 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the emergence of multiperspectival institutional forms is identified as a key dimension of the condition of postmodernity in international politics and suggests some ways in which that exploration might proceed.
Abstract: The concept of territoriality has been studied surprisingly little by students of international politics. Yet, territoriality most distinctively defines modernity in international politics, and changes in few other factors can so powerfully transform the modern world polity. This article seeks to frame the study of the possible transformation of modern territoriality by examining how that system of relations was instituted in the first place. The historical analysis suggests that “unbundled” territoriality is a useful terrain for exploring the condition of postmodernity in international politics and suggests some ways in which that exploration might proceed. The emergence of multiperspectival institutional forms is identified as a key dimension of the condition of postmodernity in international politics.

1,906 citations