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Angela P. Harris

Bio: Angela P. Harris is an academic researcher from University of California, Davis. The author has contributed to research in topics: Critical race theory & Racism. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 49 publications receiving 1860 citations. Previous affiliations of Angela P. Harris include Washington and Lee University & University of California, Berkeley.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the forms of the southern clouds at dawn on the 30th of April, 1882, and the outlines of the foam raised by an oar in the Rio Negro the night before the Quebracho uprising were reconstructed.
Abstract: knew by heart the forms of the southern clouds at dawn on the 30th of April, 1882, and could compare them in his memory with the mottled streaks on a book in Spanish binding he had only seen once and with the outlines of the foam raised by an oar in the Rio Negro the night before the Quebracho uprising. These memories were not simple ones; each visual image was linked to muscular sensations, thermal sensations, etc. He could reconstruct all his dreams, all his half-dreams. Two or three times he had reconstructed a whole day; he never hesitated, but each reconstruction had required a whole day.3

663 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Presumed Incompetent as mentioned in this paper is a path breaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators.
Abstract: Presumed Incompetent is a path breaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provide a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America.

415 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a survey of critical race theory at the turn of the millennium, focusing on the first decade of the 21st century and focusing on race, gender, and sexual orientation.
Abstract: Foreword: Who Are We? And Why Are We Here? Doing Critical Race Theory in Hard Times --Charles R. Lawrence III Introduction: Battles Waged, Won, and Lost: Critical Race Theory at the Turn of the Millennium --Francisco Valdes, Jerome McCristal Culp, and Angela P. Harris Part I: Histories 1. The First Decade: Critical Reflections, or "A Foot In the Closing Door" --Kimberle Williams Crenshaw 2. Historicizing Critical Race Theory's Cutting Edge: Key Movements that Performed the Theory --Sumi Cho and Robert Westley 3. Keeping It Real: On Anti-"Essentialism" --Catharine A. MacKinnon Part II: Crossroads Section A: Race Critiquing "Race' and Its Uses: Critical Race Theory's Uncompleted Argument --Robert S. Chang 4. The Poetics of Colorlined Space --Anthony Paul Farley 5. Un-Natural Things: Constructions of Race, Gender, and Disability --Robert L. Hayman, Jr., and Nancy Levit 6. Race and the Immigration Laws: The Need for Critical Inquiry --Kevin R. Johnson 7. "Simple Logic": Race, the Identity Documents Rule, and the Story of a Nation Besieged and Betrayed --Sherene H. Razack 8. Straight Out of the Closet: Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation --Devon W. Carbado Section B: Narrativity Celebrating Racialized Legal Narratives --Margaret E. Montoya 9. The Unbearable Whiteness of Being --Thomas Ross 10. Construction Project: Color Me Queer + Color Me Family = Camilo's Story --Victoria Ortiz and Jennifer Elrod 11. On Being Homeless: One Aboriginal Woman's "Conquest" of Canadian Universities --1989-98 --Patricia Monture-Angus 12. Dinner and Self-Determination --Henry J. Richardson III Section C: Globalization Critical Race Theory in Global Context --Celina Romany 13. Global Markets, Racial Spaces, and the Role of Critical Race Theory in the Struggle for Community Control of Investments: An Institutional Class Analysis --Elizabeth M. Iglesias 14. Global Feminism at the Local Level: The Criminalization of Female Genital Surgeries --Isabelle R. Gunning 15. Breaking Cycles of Inequality: Critical Theory, Human Rights, and Family In/Justice --Berta Esperanza Hermandez-Truyol 16. Critical Race Theory and Post-Colonial Development --Enrique R. Carrasco Part III: Directions 17. Critical Coalitions: Theory and Praxis --Julie A. Su and Eric Y. Yamamoto 18. Beyond, and Not Beyond, Black and White: Deconstruction has a Politics --Mari Matsuda 19. Outsider Scholars, Critical Race Theory, and "Outcrit" Perspectivity: Postsubordination Vision as Jurisprudential Method --Francisco Valdes Afterword: The Handmaid's Truth --Derrick A. Bell About the Contributors

140 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Presumed Incompetent as mentioned in this paper is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color, which is filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provides a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America.
Abstract: Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. One of the topics addressed is the importance of forging supportive networks to transform the workplace and create a more hospitable environment for traditionally subordinated groups. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provide a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America. The downloadable document contains the Introduction to Presumed Incompetent co-authored by Angela P. Harris and Carmen G. Gonzalez.

98 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors conceptualized community cultural wealth as a critical race theory (CRT) challenge to traditional interpretations of cultural capital, shifting the research lens away from a deficit view of Communities of Color as places full of cultural poverty disadvantages, and instead focusing on and learns from the array of cultural knowledge, skills, abilities and contacts possessed by socially marginalized groups that often go unrecognized and unacknowledged.
Abstract: This article conceptualizes community cultural wealth as a critical race theory (CRT) challenge to traditional interpretations of cultural capital. CRT shifts the research lens away from a deficit view of Communities of Color as places full of cultural poverty disadvantages, and instead focuses on and learns from the array of cultural knowledge, skills, abilities and contacts possessed by socially marginalized groups that often go unrecognized and unacknowledged. Various forms of capital nurtured through cultural wealth include aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial and resistant capital. These forms of capital draw on the knowledges Students of Color bring with them from their homes and communities into the classroom. This CRT approach to education involves a commitment to develop schools that acknowledge the multiple strengths of Communities of Color in order to serve a larger purpose of struggle toward social and racial justice.

4,897 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, critical race theory can inform a critical race methodology in education and the authors challenge the intercentricity of racism with other forms of subordination and expose deficit-informed research that silences and distorts epistemologies of people of color.
Abstract: This article addresses how critical race theory can inform a critical race methodology in education. The authors challenge the intercentricity of racism with other forms of subordination and exposes deficit-informed research that silences and distorts epistemologies of people of color. Although social scientists tell stories under the guise of “objective” research, these stories actually uphold deficit, racialized notions about people of color. For the authors, a critical race methodology provides a tool to “counter” deficit storytelling. Specifically, a critical race methodology offers space to conduct and present research grounded in the experiences and knowledge of people of color. As they describe how they compose counter-stories, the authors discuss how the stories can be used as theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical tools to challenge racism, sexism, and classism and work toward social justice.

3,102 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors show that in contexts of historical political subordination and low de facto legitimacy, descriptive representation helps create a social meaning of "ability to rule" and increases the attachment to the polity of members of the group.
Abstract: Disadvantaged groups gain advantages from descriptive representation in at least four contexts. In contexts of group mistrust and uncrystallized interests, the better communication and experiential knowledge of descriptive representatives enhances their substantive representation of the group's interests by improving the quality of deliberation. In contexts of historical political subordination and low de facto legitimacy, descriptive representation helps create a social meaning of "ability to rule" and increases the attachment to the polity of members of the group. When the implementation of descriptive representation involves some costs in other values, paying those costs makes most sense in these specific historical contexts.

1,886 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jennifer Nash1
TL;DR: The authors exposes and critically interrogates the assumptions underpinning intersectionality by focusing on four tensions within intersectionality scholarship: the lack of a defined intersectional methodology; the use of black women as quintessential intersectional subjects; the vague definition of intersectionality; and the empirical validity of intersectional theories.
Abstract: Intersectionality has become the primary analytic tool that feminist and anti-racist scholars deploy for theorizing identity and oppression. This paper exposes and critically interrogates the assumptions underpinning intersectionality by focusing on four tensions within intersectionality scholarship: the lack of a defined intersectional methodology; the use of black women as quintessential intersectional subjects; the vague definition of intersectionality; and the empirical validity of intersectionality. Ultimately, my project does not seek to undermine intersectionality; instead, I encourage both feminist and anti-racist scholars to grapple with intersectionality’s theoretical, political, and methodological murkiness to construct a more complex way of theorizing identity and oppression.

1,394 citations