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Author

Angi Buettner

Bio: Angi Buettner is an academic researcher from Victoria University of Wellington. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Genocide. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 9 publications receiving 30 citations. Previous affiliations of Angi Buettner include University of Otago & Wellington Management Company.

Papers
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Book
21 Oct 2011
TL;DR: Holocaust Images and Picturing Catastrophe explores the phenomenon of Holocaust transfer, analysing the widespread practice of using the Holocaust and its imagery for the representation and recording of other historical events in various media sites as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Holocaust Images and Picturing Catastrophe explores the phenomenon of Holocaust transfer, analysing the widespread practice of using the Holocaust and its imagery for the representation and recording of other historical events in various media sites. It investigates the use of Holocaust imagery in political and legal discourses, in critical thinking and philosophy, as well as in popular culture, to provide a fresh theorisation of the manner in which the Holocaust comes loose from its historical context and is applied to events and campaigns in the contemporary public sphere. Richly illustrated with concrete examples, including prominent, international animal rights activism, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the genocide in Rwanda, this book traces the visual rhetoric of Holocaust imagery and its application to events other than the genocide of Jewish people With its discussion of the wide range of issues arising with this form of 'Holocaust-transfer', the generalization of the Holocaust as a metaphor in representations of catastrophe, as well as in other cultural locations, Holocaust Images and Picturing Catastrophe will appeal to those working in the fields of holocaust studies, cultural and visual culture studies, sociology, and media studies.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe and contextualize the development whereby data and information flows derived from social media sites are gathered and made available as part of crisis maps, and consider the extent to which this new media based institutional and public information sharing and deployment constitutes a significant tool within the relevant networks of communication practices and practitioners.
Abstract: This article will describe and contextualize the development whereby data and information flows derived from social media sites are gathered and made available as part of crisis maps. In particular it will look at the evidence available to describe and contextualise the use of crisis mapping as it was played out during the initial recovery period of the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes. It will also consider to the extent to which this new media based institutional and public information sharing and deployment constitutes a significant tool within the relevant networks of communication practices and practitioners.

6 citations

01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: The authors examines the use of the trickster imagination and the appropriations of trickster mythology by writers from formerly colonised countries as a rich and relevant arsenal of material for their project of cultural transformation and critique.
Abstract: This essay examines the use of trickster imagination and the appropriations of trickster mythology by writers from formerly colonised countries as a rich and relevant arsenal of material for their project of cultural transformation and critique. It shows the trickster figure as an ambivalent image and discusses the functions of laughter in trickster imagination. One of the most famously recorded trickster figures is Coyote, the trickster of American Indian mythology (Radin 1972). Coyote is a somewhat unfortunate

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors deal with the public and media debates about climate change and critique the media framing and staging of these debates, particularly in relation to notions of journalistic objectivity and balance.
Abstract: This article deals with the public and media debates about climate change. It critiques the media framing and staging of these debates, particularly in relation to notions of journalistic objectivity and balance. The logic of the media in covering climate change, and in creating scientific credibility, is discussed on the example of what became known as the Monbiot vs Plimer debate. After George Monbiot (wellknown for his environmental journalism and advocacy) criticised Ian Plimer (Australian professor of Mining Geology and quasi-climate scientist) for a book he had published denying climate change, Plimer challenged Monbiot to a public debate on the science of climate change.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argues that the School Strike for Climate movement, and with it the whole climate movement as well as other resistance mobilizations, is in danger of being immobilized by the logic of th...
Abstract: This essay argues that the School Strike for Climate movement, and with it the whole climate movement as well as other resistance mobilizations, is in danger of being immobilized by the logic of th...

4 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: NeoGeography as mentioned in this paper is defined as a blurring of the distinctions between producer, communicator and consumer of geographic information, and it can be seen as a way of "deletion".
Abstract: NeoGeography has been defined as a blurring of the distinctions between producer, communicator and consumer of geographic information. The relationship between professional and amateur varies across disciplines. The subject matter of geography is familiar to everyone, and the acquisition and compilation of geographic data have become vastly easier as technology has advanced. The authority of traditional mapping agencies can be attributed to their specifications, production mechanisms and programs for quality control. Very different mechanisms work to ensure the quality of data volunteered by amateurs. Academic geographers are concerned with the extraction of knowledge from geographic data using a combination of analytic tools and accumulated theory. The definition of NeoGeography implies a misunderstanding of this role of the professional, but English lacks a basis for a better term.

289 citations

Book
06 Jul 2017
TL;DR: In this article, Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present, revealing the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war as a language of memory in its own right.
Abstract: What we know of war is always mediated knowledge and feeling. We need lenses to filter out some of its blinding, terrifying light. These lenses are not fixed; they change over time, and Jay Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present. He reveals the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war, from painting and sculpture to photography, film and poetry, and ultimately to silence, as a language of memory in its own right. He shows how these highly mediated images of war, in turn, circulate through language to constitute our 'cultural memory' of war. This is a major contribution to our understanding of the diverse ways in which men and women have wrestled with the intractable task of conveying what twentieth-century wars meant to them and mean to us.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a case study of water insecurity demonstrates how neo-liberalism props up and legitimises decentralised water governance in Canada, which in turn promotes and maintains environmental inequality, Indigenous marginalisation and, ultimately, the Canadian identity.
Abstract: With the exception of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people, most Canadians enjoy water security. Indigenous people are ninety times more likely than other Canadians to lack piped water. These disparities result from and maintain the colonial relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples. As displaced people with values often in opposition to neo-liberalism, Indigenous people present an existential threat to Canadian identity, this identity having been created around possession of a vast land that extends to the North Pole, and subsequent heavy resource extraction throughout this land. To maintain Canada’s national identity and the activities that support it, Indigenous people have to be pushed to the figurative and literal fringes and rendered invisible. Five short case studies of water insecurity demonstrate how neo-liberalism props up and legitimises decentralised water governance in Canada, which in turn promotes and maintains environmental inequality, Indigenous marginalisation and, ultimately, the Canadian identity. Abstract: A l’exception des peuples des Premieres Nations, des Metis et des Inuits, la plupart des Canadiens beneficient de la securite de l’eau. Les peuples indigenes ont quatre-vingt-dix fois plus de chances que les autres Canadiens de manquer d’eau courante. Ces disparites sont le resultat et maintiennent la relation coloniale entre le Canada et les peuples indigenes. En tant que populations deplacees ayant des valeurs souvent en opposition au neoliberalisme, les peuples indigenes presentent une menace existentielle a l’identite canadienne, cette identite ayant ete creee autour de la possession d’un vaste pays qui s’etend jusqu’au Pole Nord, et la forte extraction ulterieure de ressources a travers tout le pays. Afin de maintenir l’identite nationale du Canada et les activites qui la soutiennent, les peuples indigenes ont ete repousses vers les marges figurees et litterales et ont etes rendus invisibles. Cinq courtes etudes de cas d’insecurite de l’eau demontrent comment le neoliberalisme soutient et legitime la gouvernance decentralisee de l’eau au Canada, qui a son tour promeut et maintient l’inegalite environnementale, la marginalisation indigene, et, finalement, l’identite canadienne.

26 citations