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Animesh Pathak

Bio: Animesh Pathak is an academic researcher from French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation. The author has contributed to research in topics: Wireless sensor network & Middleware. The author has an hindex of 18, co-authored 44 publications receiving 1009 citations. Previous affiliations of Animesh Pathak include University of Southern California & Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology.

Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Sep 2015
TL;DR: A novel framework called CCS-TA is proposed, combining the state-of-the-art compressive sensing, Bayesian inference, and active learning techniques, to dynamically select a minimum number of sub-areas for sensing task allocation in each sensing cycle, while deducing the missing data of unallocated sub-wereas under a probabilistic data accuracy guarantee.
Abstract: Data quality and budget are two primary concerns in urban-scale mobile crowdsensing applications. In this paper, we leverage the spatial and temporal correlation among the data sensed in different sub-areas to significantly reduce the required number of sensing tasks allocated (corresponding to budget), yet ensuring the data quality. Specifically, we propose a novel framework called CCS-TA, combining the state-of-the-art compressive sensing, Bayesian inference, and active learning techniques, to dynamically select a minimum number of sub-areas for sensing task allocation in each sensing cycle, while deducing the missing data of unallocated sub-areas under a probabilistic data accuracy guarantee. Evaluations on real-life temperature and air quality monitoring datasets show the effectiveness of CCS-TA. In the case of temperature monitoring, CCS-TA allocates 18.0-26.5% fewer tasks than baseline approaches, allocating tasks to only 15.5% of the sub-areas on average while keeping overall sensing error below 0.25°C in 95% of the cycles.

165 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This introductory article to the special section “Software Diversity—Modeling, Analysis and Evolution” provides an overview of the current state of the art in diverse systems development and discusses challenges and potential solutions.
Abstract: Diversity is prevalent in modern software systems to facilitate adapting the software to customer requirements or the execution environment. Diversity has an impact on all phases of the software development process. Appropriate means and organizational structures are required to deal with the additional complexity introduced by software variability. This introductory article to the special section "Software Diversity--Modeling, Analysis and Evolution" provides an overview of the current state of the art in diverse systems development and discusses challenges and potential solutions. The article covers requirements analysis, design, implementation, verification and validation, maintenance and evolution as well as organizational aspects. It also provides an overview of the articles which are part of this special section and addresses particular issues of diverse systems development.

156 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
18 Mar 2013
TL;DR: A probabilistic registration approach is presented, based on a realistic human mobility model, that allows devices to decide whether or not to register their sensing services depending on the probability of other, equivalent devices being present at the locations of their expected path.
Abstract: One of the main benefits of mobile participatory sensing becoming a reality is the increased knowledge it will provide about the real world while relying on a large number of mobile devices. Those devices can host different types of sensors incorporated in every aspect of our lives. However, given the increasing number of capable mobile devices, any participatory sensing approach should be, first and foremost, scalable. To address this challenge, we present an approach to decrease the participation of (sensing) devices in a manner that does not compromise the accuracy of the real-world information while increasing the efficiency of the overall system. To reduce the number of the devices involved, we present a probabilistic registration approach, based on a realistic human mobility model, that allows devices to decide whether or not to register their sensing services depending on the probability of other, equivalent devices being present at the locations of their expected path. We present the design and implementation of a registration middleware based on our techniques, using which mobile devices can base their registration decision. Through experiments performed on real and simulated datasets, we show that our approach scales, while not sacrificing significant amounts of sensing coverage.

75 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article proposes a novel crowdsensing task allocation framework called SPACE-TA (SPArse Cost-Effective Task Allocation), combining compressive sensing, statistical analysis, active learning, and transfer learning, to dynamically select a small set of subareas for sensing in each timeslot (cycle), while inferring the data of unsensed subarea under a probabilistic data quality guarantee.
Abstract: Data quality and budget are two primary concerns in urban-scale mobile crowdsensing. Traditional research on mobile crowdsensing mainly takes sensing coverage ratio as the data quality metric rather than the overall sensed data error in the target-sensing area. In this article, we propose to leverage spatiotemporal correlations among the sensed data in the target-sensing area to significantly reduce the number of sensing task assignments. In particular, we exploit both intradata correlations within the same type of sensed data and interdata correlations among different types of sensed data in the sensing task. We propose a novel crowdsensing task allocation framework called SPACE-TA (SPArse Cost-Effective Task Allocation), combining compressive sensing, statistical analysis, active learning, and transfer learning, to dynamically select a small set of subareas for sensing in each timeslot (cycle), while inferring the data of unsensed subareas under a probabilistic data quality guarantee. Evaluations on real-life temperature, humidity, air quality, and traffic monitoring datasets verify the effectiveness of SPACE-TA. In the temperature-monitoring task leveraging intradata correlations, SPACE-TA requires data from only 15.5% of the subareas while keeping the inference error below 0.25°C in 95% of the cycles, reducing the number of sensed subareas by 18.0% to 26.5% compared to baselines. When multiple tasks run simultaneously, for example, for temperature and humidity monitoring, SPACE-TA can further reduce ∼10% of the sensed subareas by exploiting interdata correlations.

62 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Dec 2011
TL;DR: This paper presents a domain model for applications in the Internet of Things, based on a survey of recently proposed IoT applications from the real world that represent a wide class of behaviors found in IoT use cases.
Abstract: The Internet of Things (IoT) integrates the physical world with the existing Internet, and is rapidly gaining popularity, thanks to the increased adoption of smart phones and sensing devices. One of the important challenges in this domain is to enable domain experts to easily specify applications for the IoT. As a first step towards developing a suitable programming abstraction, in this paper we present a domain model for applications in the Internet of Things, based on a survey of recently proposed IoT applications from the real world that represent a wide class of behaviors found in IoT use cases.

51 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a comprehensive literature review on applications of deep reinforcement learning (DRL) in communications and networking, and presents applications of DRL for traffic routing, resource sharing, and data collection.
Abstract: This paper presents a comprehensive literature review on applications of deep reinforcement learning (DRL) in communications and networking. Modern networks, e.g., Internet of Things (IoT) and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) networks, become more decentralized and autonomous. In such networks, network entities need to make decisions locally to maximize the network performance under uncertainty of network environment. Reinforcement learning has been efficiently used to enable the network entities to obtain the optimal policy including, e.g., decisions or actions, given their states when the state and action spaces are small. However, in complex and large-scale networks, the state and action spaces are usually large, and the reinforcement learning may not be able to find the optimal policy in reasonable time. Therefore, DRL, a combination of reinforcement learning with deep learning, has been developed to overcome the shortcomings. In this survey, we first give a tutorial of DRL from fundamental concepts to advanced models. Then, we review DRL approaches proposed to address emerging issues in communications and networking. The issues include dynamic network access, data rate control, wireless caching, data offloading, network security, and connectivity preservation which are all important to next generation networks, such as 5G and beyond. Furthermore, we present applications of DRL for traffic routing, resource sharing, and data collection. Finally, we highlight important challenges, open issues, and future research directions of applying DRL.

1,153 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper outlines a set of requirements for IoT middleware, and presents a comprehensive review of the existing middleware solutions against those requirements, and open research issues, challenges, and future research directions are highlighted.
Abstract: The Internet of Things (IoT) envisages a future in which digital and physical things or objects (e.g., smartphones, TVs, cars) can be connected by means of suitable information and communication technologies, to enable a range of applications and services. The IoT’s characteristics, including an ultra-large-scale network of things, device and network level heterogeneity, and large numbers of events generated spontaneously by these things, will make development of the diverse applications and services a very challenging task. In general, middleware can ease a development process by integrating heterogeneous computing and communications devices, and supporting interoperability within the diverse applications and services. Recently, there have been a number of proposals for IoT middleware. These proposals mostly addressed wireless sensor networks (WSNs), a key component of IoT, but do not consider RF identification (RFID), machine-to-machine (M2M) communications, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), other three core elements in the IoT vision. In this paper, we outline a set of requirements for IoT middleware, and present a comprehensive review of the existing middleware solutions against those requirements. In addition, open research issues, challenges, and future research directions are highlighted.

805 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Emerging Internet of Things architecture, large scale sensor network applications, federating sensor networks, sensor data and related context capturing techniques, challenges in cloud-based management, storing, archiving and processing of sensor data are discussed.
Abstract: Internet of Things (IoT) will comprise billions of devices that can sense, communicate, compute and potentially actuate Data streams coming from these devices will challenge the traditional approaches to data management and contribute to the emerging paradigm of big data This paper discusses emerging Internet of Things (IoT) architecture, large scale sensor network applications, federating sensor networks, sensor data and related context capturing techniques, challenges in cloud-based management, storing, archiving and processing of sensor data

459 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article presents a taxonomy of WSN programming approaches that captures the fundamental differences among existing solutions, and uses the taxonomy to provide an exhaustive classification of existing approaches.
Abstract: Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are attracting great interest in a number of application domains concerned with monitoring and control of physical phenomena, as they enable dense and untethered deployments at low cost and with unprecedented flexibility. However, application development is still one of the main hurdles to a wide adoption of WSN technology. In current real-world WSN deployments, programming is typically carried out very close to the operating system, therefore requiring the programmer to focus on low-level system issues. This not only distracts the programmer from the application logic, but also requires a technical background rarely found among application domain experts. The need for appropriate high-level programming abstractions, capable of simplifying the programming chore without sacrificing efficiency, has long been recognized, and several solutions have hitherto been proposed, which differ along many dimensions. In this article, we survey the state of the art in programming approaches for WSNs. We begin by presenting a taxonomy of WSN applications, to identify the fundamental requirements programming platforms must deal with. Then, we introduce a taxonomy of WSN programming approaches that captures the fundamental differences among existing solutions, and constitutes the core contribution of this article. Our presentation style relies on concrete examples and code snippets taken from programming platforms representative of the taxonomy dimensions being discussed. We use the taxonomy to provide an exhaustive classification of existing approaches. Moreover, we also map existing approaches back to the application requirements, therefore providing not only a complete view of the state of the art, but also useful insights for selecting the programming abstraction most appropriate to the application at hand.

402 citations