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Author

Anke Schmid

Bio: Anke Schmid is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Modernity. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 97 citations.
Topics: Modernity

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Book
29 Sep 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, Traisnel argues that the desire to capture animals in representation responded to and normalized the systemic disappearance of animals effected by unprecedented changes in the land, the rise of mass slaughter, and the new awareness of species extinction.
Abstract: From Audubon’s still-life watercolors to Muybridge’s trip-wire locomotion studies, from Melville’s epic chases to Poe’s detective hunts, the nineteenth century witnessed a surge of artistic, literary, and scientific treatments that sought to “capture” the truth of animals at the historical moment when animals were receding from everyday view. In Capture, Antoine Traisnel reveals how the drive to contain and record disappearing animals was a central feature and organizing pursuit of the nineteenth-century U.S. cultural canon. Capture offers a critical genealogy of the dominant representation of animals as elusive, precarious, and endangered that came to circulate widely in the nineteenth century. Traisnel argues that “capture” is deeply continuous with the projects of white settler colonialism and the biocapitalist management of nonhuman and human populations, demonstrating that the desire to capture animals in representation responded to and normalized the systemic disappearance of animals effected by unprecedented changes in the land, the rise of mass slaughter, and the new awareness of species extinction. Tracking the prototyping of biopolitical governance and capitalist modes of control, Traisnel theorizes capture as a regime of vision by which animals came to be seen, over the course of the nineteenth century, as at once unknowable and yet understood in advance—a frame by which we continue to encounter animals today.

71 citations

Book
02 Mar 2017
TL;DR: Malkowski analyzes a wide range of death footage, from feature films about the terminally ill ( Dying, Silverlake Life, Sick ), to surreptitiously recorded suicides ( The Bridge ), to #BlackLivesMatter YouTube videos and their precursors.
Abstract: In Dying in Full Detail Jennifer Malkowski explores digital media's impact on one of documentary film's greatest taboos: the recording of death. Despite technological advances that allow for the easy creation and distribution of death footage, digital media often fail to live up to their promise to reveal the world in greater fidelity. Malkowski analyzes a wide range of death footage, from feature films about the terminally ill ( Dying , Silverlake Life , Sick ), to surreptitiously recorded suicides ( The Bridge ), to #BlackLivesMatter YouTube videos and their precursors. Contextualizing these recordings in the long history of attempts to capture the moment of death in American culture, Malkowski shows how digital media are unable to deliver death "in full detail," as its metaphysical truth remains beyond representation. Digital technology's capacity to record death does, however, provide the opportunity to politicize individual deaths through their representation. Exploring the relationships among technology, temporality, and the ethical and aesthetic debates about capturing death on video, Malkowski illuminates the key roles documentary death has played in twenty-first-century visual culture.

56 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce the notion of "skepticism films" as an updated configuration of skeptical themes that exemplify the pervasion of philosophical ideas in popular culture, including movies such as The Truman Show, Inception, Matrix, Vanilla Sky, The Thirteenth Floor, and Moon.
Abstract: Cinema has always displayed an affinity to characters with distorted or even hallucinatory relations to reality. With such films as The Truman Show, the Matrix films or Inception, contemporary filmmakers add another layer to this canon of film characters: unwitting ordinary victims of deception for who the skepticist fear that the world is not real but a simulation, fake environment or a dream has become true. From a philosophical perspective, such films vary the idea that we are not able to "know what we think we know" (Stroud) about the world we live in, about ourselves, or about others. They are ‘skepticism films’: dramatized, fictional configurations of the thought experiments which are part and parcel of philosophical reflection on knowledge and doubt. This dissertation introduces skepticism films as updated configurations of skepticist themes that exemplify the pervasion of philosophical ideas in popular culture. The first part defends a pluralistic film-philosophical position according to which films can be, but need not be, expressions of philosophical thought in their own right. The dissertation then critically investigates the influence of ideas of skepticism on film-philosophical theories, exemplified in the works of film-philosophers such as Cavell, Deleuze, Rodowick, Fruchtl, and Pisters. The concluding parts develop a typology of skepticism films and analyse selected films such as The Truman Show, Inception, Matrix, Vanilla Sky, The Thirteenth Floor, and Moon. With its focus on skepticism as one of the most significant philosophical problems, the dissertation aims at better understanding the dynamic interplay between film, theories of film and philosophy.

43 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the frequent, yet overlooked, occurrence of depictions of financial activity and speculation in the cinema of the Weimar Republic and reveal a broader engagement with financial themes and speculative activity, evidenced in canonical as well as little known films of the time.
Abstract: This dissertation examines the frequent, yet overlooked, occurrence of depictions of financial activity and speculation in the cinema of the Weimar Republic. The few existing treatments of economic themes in Weimar Cinema have focused on the signature crisis events of the period: the hyperinflation of 1921-23 and the onset of the Weltwirtschaftskrise in 1929. I reveal a broader engagement with financial themes and speculative activity, evidenced in canonical as well as little known films of the time. This project contributes to the historical understanding of the everyday fabric of Weimar culture, and argues that the importance of the emergence of a post-WWI German homo-economicus is central to our understanding of this period. The Weimar Republic, and the city of Berlin itself, function as a locus classicus in discourses on European modernity, and the scholarship on the key sites of modernity is well established. Within this discourse however, surprisingly little attention has been paid to spaces of finance such as the Borse (stock exchange). This project aims to evaluate how these spaces were represented to a rapidly expanding, film-going demographic that appeared after WWI: the bank clerks, tellers, insurance workers and brokers, amongst the “white collar workers” identified by Siegfried Kracauer. I argue that popular filmic depictions of financial activity gave form to the otherwise invisible forces of financial exchange. I draw on the work of German speaking economists of the late 19th century, who were the first to articulate the contours of an image of the “world economy.” I claim that the activity of the market was itself a labour of representation that, in the words of Friedrich Engels, reproduced an image of the world as “an inverted reflection.” For non-specialist viewers of these films, fictional accounts of financial activity provided an image of the interconnected global economy, and distilled its complexity into key tropes and stereotypes that also appeared in the Weimar illustrated press. Thus, this project aims to establish the importance of fictional representations to the creation of the worldview of the modern market through the discussion of key films from the period.

42 citations