scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Ann Faulkner

Bio: Ann Faulkner is an academic researcher from University of Manchester. The author has contributed to research in topics: Curriculum development & Extended family. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 9 publications receiving 99 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Encouragement, especially from other smokers trying to stop smoking, help with cessation techniques, regular opportunities to monitor progress and receive support were all features identified by current smokers and ex-smokers as being useful in the design of a support system which might help those nurses who wished to stopsmoking.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Schriick and Schriick as discussed by the authors discuss the role of head and class teachers on school-supervised practice, British Journal of Teacher Education, 3: 121-130.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper focuses on the programme content, teaching methods and appropriate technology associated with implementing a curriculum development programme on communication.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A range of problems encountered while setting up support groups were described, some of which were specifically to help nurses give up smoking while others were planned to help with a widerange of problems.

5 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
Cathy Heaven1, Peter Maguire
TL;DR: It is concluded that simple skills training is insufficient to change clinical behavior, and other factors which should be addressed in future training programmes are discussed.
Abstract: Patient assessment underpins every aspect of nursing care However, there is much evidence to suggest that many nurses lack the skills necessary to communicate effectively with their patients, and so assess their individual problems and concerns Communication studies to date have been descriptive, or have concentrated on acquisition of skills without addressing the impact this has on patient care This paper reviews a study of 44 hospice nurses who were taught assessment skills It discusses the impact of training not only on their skill level, but also on their ability to elicit their patients’ concerns It concludes that simple skills training is insufficient to change clinical behaviour, and discusses other factors which should be addressed in future training programmes

168 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There are indications that SFBT techniques may be relevant to nursing and a useful, cost-effective approach to the training of communication skills.
Abstract: Nurses’ communication skills: an evaluation of the impact of solution-focused communication training Aims. This paper describes the evaluation of a short training course in solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) skills. This evaluation examined the relevance of SFBT skills to nursing and the extent to which a short training course affected nurses’ communication skills. Background. Nurses’ communication skills have been criticized for many years, as has the training in communication skills that nurses receive. The absence of a coherent theoretical or practical framework for communication skills training led us to consider the utility of SFBT as a framework for a short training course for qualified nurses, the majority of them are registered nurses working with adults. Design and methods. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected: the former using pre- and post-training scales, the latter using a focus group conducted 6 months after the training. Data were analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and content analysis. Results and findings. Quantitative data indicated positive changes in nurses’ practice following the training on four dimensions, and changes in nurses’ willingness to communicate with people who are troubled reached levels of significance. Qualitative data uncovered changes to practice, centred on the rejection of problem-orientated discourses and reduced feelings of inadequacy and emotional stress in the nurses. Conclusions. There are indications that SFBT techniques may be relevant to nursing and a useful, cost-effective approach to the training of communication skills. Solution focused brief therapy provides a framework and easily understood tool-kit that are harmonious with nursing values.

163 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A significant negative correlation was found between the percentage of IEP objectives met variable and three collaborative variables--team meetings, reviewing progress, and develop goals and objectives, indicating that as the frequency of these team processes increased, fewer objectives were met.
Abstract: Objective A descriptive, correlational study using a survey instrument and record review was designed to describe collaboration practices between teachers and occupational therapists in public schools and to explore relationships of these practices to individual education plan (IEP) objectives and teachers' perceptions of occupational therapy contributions to student skill development. Method Forty teachers of students who receive occupational therapy comprised the sample. Descriptive statistics and Spearman rank order correlations were used to describe the practices and to determine associations among the variables. Results and conclusions The findings indicated that teachers and occupational therapists were using collaborative team practices, such as jointly developing goals and objectives, collaboration within the classrooms, jointly monitoring interventions, and jointly reviewing student progress. However, scheduling team meetings was difficult. The majority of respondents stated that occupational therapy contributed to student skill development, and as collaboration practices increased, the teachers' perceptions of occupational therapy contribution to student skill development increased. A significant negative correlation was found between the percentage of IEP objectives met variable and three collaborative variables--team meetings, reviewing progress, and develop goals and objectives. This finding indicated that as the frequency of these team processes increased, fewer objectives were met.

104 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping than others and believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses.
Abstract: Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.

76 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A critical overview of the literature is presented and where appropriate data about the incidence of smoking in comparable groups of the general population is provided.
Abstract: The incidence of smoking amongst nurses: a review of the literature Over the years there has been an ongoing debate about the implications of the smoking behaviour of nurses in relation to their own health and in the context of their professional role and responsibilities. However it is difficult to determine with any degree of accuracy the current incidence of smoking amongst nurses and most of the available research is based on small samples which embrace nurses of different levels and status. Very few recent studies in the United Kingdom or elsewhere have focused on this issue. A confused picture therefore emerges. This paper presents a critical overview of the literature and where appropriate provides data about the incidence of smoking in comparable groups of the general population.

68 citations