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Anne Gilbert

Bio: Anne Gilbert is an academic researcher from University of Ottawa. The author has contributed to research in topics: Social capital & Social determinants of health. The author has an hindex of 12, co-authored 54 publications receiving 678 citations. Previous affiliations of Anne Gilbert include University of Alberta & University of California, Los Angeles.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a review of both previous interpretations of traditional regional geography and its more contemporary expressions, and of major contributions theoretical and empirical to the geographical study of specific regions in the last 10 years.
Abstract: Confronted with realities too complex to be subsumed under mere generic models, geographers are rediscovering the study of the specific. Indeed, the analysis of the recent evolution of geography indicates that after a period devoted almost entirely to the study of geographical systems and, more recently, to the unmasking of social structures in space, geography is beginning to see those systems and structures as localized and to reexamine the specificity of places. Geographical studies of the specific inner forces acting to promote the individuality of regions are each year more numerous. And many scholars mainly associated with nomothetic thinking are now producing regional geography. Their renewed interest in the specific resurrects some of the traditional concerns of regional studies and thus can be interpreted as a return to chorology. However, we shall argue here, along with Claval (1984), Nonn (1984), Johnston (1984, 1985) and Gregory (1986a), that the regional geography practised since the mid-1970s is a new one. Its emergence may be seen as a response to recent developments in social theory, notably the reacknowledgement of the role of ’agency’ within the ’structure’, as well as to changing societal goals, of which the enhancement of diversity is not the least. The argument will be based on a review of both previous interpretations of traditional regional geography and its more contemporary expressions, and of major contributions theoretical and empirical to the geographical study of specific regions in the last 10 years. Our aim is to show the significance of today’s regional geography as an intellectual

221 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: La barriere linguistique reduirait le recours aux services preventifs et le suivi adequat des patients particulierement en ce qui a trait aux services bases sur the communication (sante mentale, readaptation, services sociaux), ce qui peut exercer une influence negative sur the sante.

50 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: In this article, a certain nombre de propositions quant a la definition de l'ideologie and quant a l'interdependance des concepts d'espace vecu et despace social legitiment is defined.
Abstract: Un certain nombre de propositions quant a la definition de l'ideologie et quant a l'interdependance des concepts d'espace vecu et d'espace social legitiment une approche des rapports homme - espace qui part de l'analyse de l'ideologie spatiale. La validite de cette approche est illustree a partir d'un exemple tire d'une etude des ideologies spatiales a Quebec qui, au-dela des representations, a fait apparaitre de veritables modes d'apprehension de la dimension spatiale de l'existence.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The vitality, determinants of health, and health management of Canada's minority Francophone communities are examined.
Abstract: The goal of this article is to outline the analytical perspectives of the concept of social capital regarding health and health management. Social capital, as defined in terms of social networks and resources, has a positive impact on a number of areas, notably the health, well-being, and social and economic development of communities. It is also a useful tool for implementing social policy, especially for marginal populations, the elderly, social assistance payments, etc. An action strategy based on the support and development of networks is the key to achieving the social development, health, and well-being of populations. The social ties promoted by these networks provide people with social, cognitive, and emotional support. This has a direct impact on their self-esteem and sense of personal achievement. They also facilitate access to social resources, including social advancement opportunities. In this paper, we examine the vitality, determinants of health, and health management of Canada’s minority Francophone communities.

30 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality by Aihwa Ong as discussed by the authors is a seminal work in the field of transnationality. ix. 322 pp., notes, bibliography, index.
Abstract: Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality. Aihwa Ong. Durham, NIC: Duke University Press, 1999. ix. 322 pp., notes, bibliography, index.

1,517 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The intention of this broad overview is to bring some particularly useful concepts developed in cultural geography to the attention of social scientists interested in matters of health and to stimulate research along new lines.

934 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors identify issues of "place", which are variously described as the "local" and "community" in the local food systems literature, and do so in conjunction with the geographic discussion focused on questions and meanings around these spatial concepts.
Abstract: Local food systems' movements, practices, and writings pose increasingly visible structures of resistance and counter-pressure to conventional globalizing food systems. The place of food seems to be the quiet centre of the discourses emerging with these movements. The purpose of this paper is to identify issues of 'place', which are variously described as the 'local' and 'community' in the local food systems literature, and to do so in conjunction with the geographic discussion focused on questions and meanings around these spatial concepts. I see raising the profile of questions, complexity and potential of these concepts as an important role and challenge for the scholar-advocate in the realm of local food systems, and for geographers sorting through them. Both literatures benefit from such a foray. The paper concludes, following a 'cautiously normative' tone, that there is strong argument for emplacing our food systems, while simultaneously calling for careful circumspection and greater clarity regarding how we delineate and understand the 'local'. Being conscious of the constructed nature of the 'local', 'community' and 'place' means seeing the importance of local social, cultural and ecological particularity in our everyday worlds, while also recognizing that we are reflexively and dialectially tied to many and diverse locals around the world.

661 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Gordon MacLeod1
TL;DR: In this article, a series of future theoretical directions for a geopolitically sensitive regional research agenda, drawing on recent thinking from the new regional geography, globalization and the politics of scale, institutional-relational state theory and the regulation approach, are presented.
Abstract: Amid the near frenzied exaltation of economic globalization and a purported decline of the nation state, a range of subnational regional economies and urban metropoles are increasingly being canonized as the paradigmatic exemplars of wealth creation. Indeed, across many of the advanced developed countries a whole host of academics, consultants, influential commentators, politicians and bourgeois interest groups are readily invoking the region to be the appropriate site for regulating global capitalism. In a recent article in IJURR, though, John Lovering disputes this emerging New Regionalism, viewing it to be seriously compromised by several practical and theoretical inadequacies. This article has two principal aims. First, and while sympathetic to the general tenor of Lovering’s critique, it offers a rejoinder through some sobering reflections on what might be recovered from the range of New Regionalist perspectives currently vying for attention within critical studies of regional development. Second, it presents a series of future theoretical directions for a geopolitically sensitive regional research agenda, drawing on recent thinking from the new regional geography, globalization and the politics of scale, institutional-relational state theory and the regulation approach. An argument is made that a synthesis of these perspectives might intensify our understanding of the social and political construction of regions, the uneven geography of growth, and the moments of re-scaled regionalized state power that now enframe the process of economic governance.

482 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Anssi Paasi1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the fundamental categories of geographical thought: region, locality, and place, the keywords in geographical discourse during the 1980s, and a reinterpretati on of the concept of region as a sociocultural and historical category is put forward.
Abstract: The author examines the fundamental categories of geographical thought: region, locality, and place, the keywords in geographical discourse during the 1980s. The relation of these categories to the sociocultural context and the everyday practices of individuals is discussed, and a reinterpretati on of the concept of region as a sociocultural and historical category is put forward. The region is comprehended as a historically contingent process whose institutionalisation consists of four stages: the development of territorial, symbolic, and institutional shape and its establishment as an entity in the regional system and social consciousness of the society. During the institutionalisation process a region becomes an established entity—with a specific regional identity—which is acknowledged in different spheres of social action and consciousness and which is continually reproduced in individual and institutional practices. The constitution of the local or regional consciousness of individuals is interpreted through the concept of place, which refers to personal experience and meanings contained in personal life-histories. These concepts together promote an understanding of how regions can be created and reproduced as part of the regional transformation of society and how individuals are contextualised into this process by reproducing region-specific structures of expectations. Generation is suggested as a mediating category for comprehending the relations between region and place.

398 citations