scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Antonio Rafael Sánchez-Rodríguez

Bio: Antonio Rafael Sánchez-Rodríguez is an academic researcher from University of Córdoba (Spain). The author has contributed to research in topics: Soil water & Chlorosis. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 32 publications receiving 458 citations. Previous affiliations of Antonio Rafael Sánchez-Rodríguez include UPRRP College of Natural Sciences & Bangor University.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relationship between root distribution, organic and inorganic N availability and potential N supply at the critical growth period during the wheat cropping cycle in a sand textured Eutric Cambisol was evaluated.
Abstract: Most studies on plant nutrition tend to focus on the topsoil (plough layer) and frequently neglect subsoil processes. However, cereal roots can potentially acquire nutrients including organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) from deep in the soil profile. Greater knowledge on the interaction of plants and microbes in subsoil environments is required to evaluate whether deep rooting traits in cereals will achieve greater nutrient use efficiency and greater soil carbon (C) storage in cropping systems. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between root distribution, organic and inorganic N availability and potential N supply at the critical growth period during the wheat cropping cycle in a sand textured Eutric Cambisol. Our results provide evidence of significant microbial capacity in the subsoil. The rate of plant residue turnover and the mineralization of organic C and N substrates (glucose, amino acids, peptides, protein) declined slightly with increasing soil depth; however, these rates were not correlated with basal soil respiration, microbial biomass or community structure. This suggests that the microbial population in subsoil is more C limited but that its activity can be readily stimulated upon C substrate addition. A significant potential for organic and inorganic N turnover was also demonstrated at depth with a similar abundance of ammonifiers and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) throughout the soil profile. Again, N mineralization in subsoils appears to be substrate limited. Root density declined rapidly down the soil profile with few roots present past 50 cm; suggesting that this is the major factor limiting C recharge of soil organic matter and microbial activity in subsoils. Greater root proliferation at depth could allow greater capture of water and the recapture of N lost by leaching; however, our results suggest that plant-microbial competition for C and N is as intense in the subsoil as in the topsoil. We conclude that while deeper rooting may improve nutrient and water use efficiency it may not lead to much greater C sequestration in subsoils, at least in the short term.

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Assessment of endophytic colonization of bread wheat and durum wheat plants by the applied fungus B. bassiana and no fungal outgrowth was detected in larval cadavers, indicating the sustainability of crop production and crop protection strategies based on B.bassiana depends on the effectiveness of the inoculation method and on the particular host plant.

106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
05 Oct 2017-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: In conclusion, EPF improved the Fe nutrition of the sorghum plants, but their effects depended on the inoculation method.
Abstract: Although entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are best known for their ability to protect crops against insect pests, they may have other beneficial effects on their host plants. These effects, which include promoting plant growth and conferring resistance against abiotic stresses, have been examined in recent years to acquire a better understanding of them. The primary purposes of the present study were (i) to ascertain in vitro whether three different strains of EPF (viz., Metarhizium, Beauveria and Isaria) would increase the Fe bioavailability in calcareous or non-calcareous media containing various Fe sources (ferrihydrite, hematite and goethite) and (ii) to assess the influence of the EPF inoculation method (seed dressing, soil treatment or leaf spraying) on the extent of the endophytic colonization of sorghum and the improvement in the Fe nutrition of pot-grown sorghum plants on an artificial calcareous substrate. All the EPFs studied were found to increase the Fe availability during the in vitro assay. The most efficient EPF was M. brunneum EAMa 01/58-Su, which lowered the pH of the calcareous medium, suggesting that it used a different strategy (organic acid release) than the other two fungi that raised the pH of the non-calcareous medium. The three methods used to inoculate sorghum plants with B. bassiana and M. brunneum in the pot experiment led to differences in re-isolation from plant tissues and in the plant height. These three inoculation methods increased the leaf chlorophyll content of young leaves when the Fe deficiency symptoms were most apparent in the control plants (without fungal inoculation) as well as the Fe content of the above-ground biomass in the plants at the end of the experiment. The total root lengths and fine roots were also increased in response to fungal applications with the three inoculation methods. However, the soil treatment was the most efficient method; thus, its effect on the leaf chlorophyll content was the most persistent, and the effects on the total root length and fine roots were the most apparent. In conclusion, EPF improved the Fe nutrition of the sorghum plants, but their effects depended on the inoculation method.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors evaluated the effect of soil mineralogy and management on phosphorus diffusion in soil and root morphology in corn grown on soil samples subjected to three different P fertilization treatments (no fertilizer, surface, and deep fertilizer application) were examined.
Abstract: Soil mineralogy and management can have substantial effects on phosphorus (P) diffusion in soil and hence on root morphology. The aim of this study was to assess these effects in soils differing widely in P-sorbing components. Samples of a Rhodic Paleudult (RP), a Rhodic Hapludox (RH), and a Humic Hapludox (HH) under conventional tillage (CT) or no-tillage (NT) were placed in Petri dishes to assess P diffusion. Performance and root morphology in corn grown on soil samples subjected to three different P fertilization treatments (no fertilizer, surface, and deep fertilizer application) were examined. Phosphorus diffusion was slower in the HH than in the other soils by effect of its high P adsorption capacity because of its mineralogy. Soil management had no effect on P diffusion. Fertilization with P only affected plant-related variables in RH: surface fertilization increased root biomass, and deep fertilization shoot biomass and proportion of thick roots. Soil management affected plants growing on HH and RP: the plants grown under NT were taller (RP) and developed more fine roots (HH) than those under CT. Fertilization with P had little effect on plant growth in the goethite-rich soil (HH) or the one with high content in available P (RP). Our results suggest that management system in these soils has therefore greater influence on fertility than fertilization treatment.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: B. bassiana alleviated Fe chlorosis symptoms in both crops during early growing stages (described for first time) and was able to colonise both tomato and wheat plants without a negative effect on plant height, plant dry weight, root development in tomato or grain production in wheat.

36 citations


Cited by
More filters
14 Jun 2019
TL;DR: In this paper, Abd Elgawad et al. discuss the sea level rise and its implications for low lying islands, coastlines and communities in the Middle East and Asia.
Abstract: Do Not Cite, Quote or Distribute 4-1 Total pages: 139 1 Chapter 4: Sea Level Rise and Implications for Low Lying Islands, Coasts and Communities 2 3 Coordinating Lead Authors: Michael Oppenheimer (USA), Bruce Glavovic (New Zealand), Tuhin Ghosh 4 (India) 5 6 Lead Authors: Amro Abd-Elgawad (Egypt), Rongshuo Cai (China), Miguel Cifuentes-Jara (Costa Rica), 7 Rob Deconto (USA), John Hay (Cook Islands), Jochen Hinkel (Germany), Federico Isla (Argentina), 8 Alexandre K. Magnan (France), Ben Marzeion (Germany), Benoit Meyssignac (France), Zita Sebesvari 9 (Hungary), AJ Smit (South Africa), Roderik van de Wal (Netherlands) 10 11 Contributing Authors: Maya Buchanan (USA), Gonéri Le Cozannet (France), Catia Domingues 12 (Australia), Virginie Duvat (France), Tamsin Edwards (UK), Miguel D. Fortes (Philippines), Thomas 13 Frederikse (Netherlands), Jean-Pierre Gattuso (France), Robert Kopp (USA), Erwin Lambert (Netherlands), 14 Elizabeth McLeod (USA), Mark Merrifield (USA), Siddharth Narayan (US), Robert J. Nicholls (UK), 15 Fabrice Renaud (UK), Jonathan Simm (UK), Jon Woodruff (USA), Poh Poh Wong (Singapore), Siyuan Xian 16 (USA) 17 18 Review Editors: Ayako Abe-Ouchi (Japan), Kapil Gupta (India), Joy Pereira (Malaysia) 19 20 Chapter Scientist Maya Buchanan (USA) 21 22 Date of Draft: 20 April 2018 23 24 Notes: TSU Compiled Version 25 26

529 citations

01 Jan 2010

362 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the effects of Fe-fertilization on the plant responses to Fe deficiency are reviewed, and the state-of-the-art of the knowledge on Fe acquisition, transport and utilization in plants is reviewed.
Abstract: Iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis is a major nutritional disorder in crops growing in calcareous soils. Iron deficiency in fruit tree crops causes chlorosis, decreases in vegetative growth and marked fruit yield and quality losses. Therefore, Fe fertilizers, either applied to the soil or delivered to the foliage, are used every year to control Fe deficiency in these crops. On the other hand, a substantial body of knowledge is available on the fundamentals of Fe uptake, long and short distance Fe transport and subcellular Fe allocation in plants. Most of this basic knowledge, however, applies only to Fe deficiency, with studies involving Fe fertilization (i.e., with Fe-deficient plants resupplied with Fe) being still scarce. This paper reviews recent developments in Fe-fertilizer research and the state-of-the-art of the knowledge on Fe acquisition, transport and utilization in plants. Also, the effects of Fe-fertilization on the plant responses to Fe deficiency are reviewed. Agronomical Fe-fertilization practices should benefit from the basic knowledge on plant Fe homeostasis already available; this should be considered as a long-term goal that can optimize fertilizer inputs, reduce grower's costs and minimize the environmental impact of fertilization.

235 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The literature currently available on the endophytic colonization of different host plants by fungal entomopathogens is reviewed, and the negative effects of such colonization on insect pests and plant pathogens that have been reported to date are summarized.

232 citations