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Anu Printsmann

Other affiliations: University of Tartu
Bio: Anu Printsmann is an academic researcher from Tallinn University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cultural landscape & Landscape ecology. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 30 publications receiving 485 citations. Previous affiliations of Anu Printsmann include University of Tartu.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that Central and Eastern European landscapes are much more diverse in time (layers) than Western European ones, and that this diversity reduces the readability of landscapes, creating miscommunication and a transformation of meanings.
Abstract: Interactions between nature and man – the underlying forces in landscape – have over time caused diversity. Usually, geographers and landscape ecologists deal with spatial diversity; in this paper, we would like to also consider temporal diversity. We argue that Central and Eastern European landscapes (using the examples of Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Slovenia) are much more diverse in time (layers) than Western European ones. This difference requires the use of different indicators in order to measure and study landscapes and special problems, threats, and possibilities of management and future development – but most important is the consideration of different perceptions. We also show that this diversity reduces the readability of landscapes, creating miscommunication and a transformation of meanings. We further argue that the link between humans and landscape is lost in Central and Eastern European countries due to temporal diversity, and that this link will be created anew in a globalizing world. To overcome alienation, we need slightly different classifications/typologies for each country in this region, with the aim of a sound future management of cultural landscapes.

131 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the rate and direction of change might not be in line with societal needs and more information on the forces driving these changes are therefor, more information can be found.
Abstract: ContextCultural landscapes evolve over time. However, the rate and direction of change might not be in line with societal needs and more information on the forces driving these changes are therefor ...

85 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a cross-site comparison study on how landscape values are perceived in six areas of Europe using public participation GIS surveys was conducted, and the results encourage land planners and researchers to approach landscape values in relation to socio-cultural and bio-physical land characteristics comprehensibly, acknowledging the complexity in the relationship between people's perception and the landscape.
Abstract: Human–nature interactions are reflected in the values people assign to landscapes These values shape our understanding and actions as landscape co-creators, and need to be taken into account to achieve an integrated management of the landscape that involves civil society The aim of this research was to increase the current knowledge on the most and least common landscape values perceived by local stakeholders, the patterns in the spatial distribution of values, and their connection to different socio-economic backgrounds and landscape characteristics across Europe The research consisted of a cross-site comparison study on how landscape values are perceived in six areas of Europe using Public Participation GIS surveys Answers were analysed combining contingency tables, spatial autocorrelation and bivariate correlation methods, kernel densities, land cover ratios, and viewshed analyses Results were discussed in the light of findings derived from other European participatory mapping studies We identified shared patterns in the perception of landscape values across Europe Recreation, aesthetics, and social fulfilment were the most common values Landscape values showed common spatial patterns mainly related to accessibility and the presence of water, settlements, and cultural heritage However, respondents in each study site had their own preferences connected to the intrinsic characteristics of the local landscape and culture The results encourage land planners and researchers to approach landscape values in relation to socio-cultural and bio-physical land characteristics comprehensibly, acknowledging the complexity in the relationship between people’s perception and the landscape, to foster more effective and inclusive landscape management strategies

70 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an overview of theme planning on designating valuable landscapes in Estonia (1999-2003) and traces its impacts through the decade up to the present is given, and the authors claim that in addition to the mapped list of valuable landscapes and their attributes as we have described them, this planning exercise called forth changes in society as well as in landscape and their appreciation.

33 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Culture is the hidden hand of land use planning as discussed by the authors, it marks the corners and edges of place; it selects which places will be sacred and which will be sacrificed; it yields maps of place and bestows place names; and it decides the aesthetics and ethics of the land.
Abstract: Culture is the hidden hand of land use planning. Culture bounds the land in diverse ways. Culture marks the corners and edges of place; it selects which places will be sacred and which will be sacrificed; it yields maps of place and bestows place names; and it decides the aesthetics and ethics of the land (Geisler 2000). Cultural heritage has been discussed by many authors of different disciplines for many decades (e.g. Meinig 1979; Lowenthal 1985; Daniels & Cosgrove 1988; Graham et al. 2000; Claval 2002; Maaranen 2003). The relationships between land use and culture are of perennial interest in such disciplines as cultural anthropology, human geography, natural history, landscape architecture and human ecology. In recent years also the landscape ecologists have started to realize the importance of cultural heritage and its role in the landscape planning process and landscape management, and a large number of works have been published in this field of research (Nassauer 1997; Stenseke 1999; Luz 2000; Oreszczyn 2000; Cantwell & Adams 2003; Fry 2003).

32 citations


Cited by
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Book Chapter
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this article, Jacobi describes the production of space poetry in the form of a poetry collection, called Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated and unedited.
Abstract: ‘The Production of Space’, in: Frans Jacobi, Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated.

7,238 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Beloit College Mindset List provides a look at the cultural background of the students entering college that fall, and what's the worldview of the class of 2014?
Abstract: 'When I was your age,' my father was fond of telling me, 'I used to walk 5 miles through a foot of snow just to go to school.' I was impressed for a while, until I noticed that, as he got older, the distance got longer and the snow got deeper. Eventually, he claimed to have walked 20 miles through 6 feet of snow. I became even more suspicious when I found out from my grandmother that they had lived three blocks from school. In an age of school buses and car-pooling parents, such stories, whether believable or not, conjure up visions of a world almost beyond the imaginations of today's children. I was reminded of that today by an email from my friend and Brandeis colleague Tom Pochapsky, who directed my attention to a fascinating article on the website of Beloit College (http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2014.php). Each August since 1998, Beloit College has released the Beloit College Mindset List, which provides a look at the cultural background of the students entering college that fall. The creation of Beloit's Keefer Professor of the Humanities Tom McBride and former Public Affairs Director Ron Nief, it was originally created as a reminder to the Beloit faculty to be aware of dated references. As the website notes, 'it quickly became a catalog of the rapidly changing worldview of each new generation.' So what's the worldview of the class of 2014? According to the latest list, here are a few of the things these 18-year-olds, born in 1992, have experienced - and not experienced: • Few in the class know how to write in cursive. • They find that email is just too slow, and they seldom if ever use snail mail. They text. Oh, God, do they text. • To them, Clint Eastwood is better known as a sensitive film director than as vigilante cop Dirty Harry. • For them, Korean cars have always been a staple on American highways. • They've never recognized that pointing to their wrists was a request for the time of day. • In their world, Czechoslovakia has never existed. There was no Berlin Wall, the Iron Curtain is a meaningless phrase, and Russia has never had a Communist government. • There has never been a world without AIDS. • The Beatles and the Rolling Stones are classical music. • Toothpaste tubes have always stood up on their caps. • There have always been women priests in the Anglican Church. • Having hundreds of cable channels but nothing good to watch has always been the norm. • The US public has never approved of the job the US Congress is doing. • Most of them have never seen a long-playing record, or even a tape drive. If they have ever seen a typewriter, it was in a museum, possibly alongside a dial telephone. • They have never lived in a world without personal computers, the Internet, CD-ROMs or laser printers. There are, of course, many things they have experienced that we also experienced at the same age. Among these are automobiles, jet airplanes, color television sets, and the Chicago Cubs not having won the World Series. Another commonality has been the enduring hostility between the English and the French. But they couldn't imagine life without PopTarts, juice boxes, and movies you can have on your home TV, and they have no idea how we could have survived in a world that required carbon paper. All of which got me wondering: what would the scientific worldview be like for someone, let's say, just starting graduate school today (and therefore about 22 years of age)? Born in 1988, how would their scientific lives differ from the lives of the generations preceding them (including mine, which is the only one I really care about)? It makes for some interesting speculation: • For today's budding biologists, DNA fingerprinting would have always existed. Actual fingerprinting would have been a recent invention, used primarily to secure laptop computers. • Protein crystal structure determination would for them never be anything but a routine tool. • Molecular biology would never have been a discipline in its own right. Instead, it would always have been a set of techniques, introduced to students in better high schools. • They cannot imagine a world without kits to make experiments virtually automatic. • Since the first free-living organism had its genome sequenced when they were 7 years old, they have grown up in the age of genomics. They have had access to the complete sequence of the human genome since they were in middle school. • They have never attended a lecture given with slides from a carousel projector, and they may not have ever seen one given from overhead transparencies either. PowerPoint has been in use for virtually their entire lives. • In their lifetime, no one has ever pipetted anything by mouth. • DNA sequencing, peptide synthesis, chemical analysis, and gene synthesis have always been farmed out to specialty companies rather than done in one's own lab. • They have almost certainly never seen anyone blow glass. In fact, many of them may not know that test tubes were ever made of anything but plastic. • They have always had the option of going into the biotechnology industry. • The term 'enzyme' has always referred to both protein and RNA. • Evolution has always been under attack, and science and religion have largely been seen as incompatible. • There have always been 'big science' projects in biology. • Chemistry has always been a declining field in terms of student interest, and physics has always been the province of a small number of practitioners. • Believe it or not, they have never known a world without cDNA microarrays. • For them, 'Xerox' is a verb, Polaroid makes LCD TVs, and every piece of equipment is computer-controlled. • They have never requested a reprint. They probably don't know what one is. • They believe that no science was done before 2000. Any science not indexed on PubMed was not done either, even if it was done yesterday. • They cannot imagine that there once was only a single Cell journal, and just one Nature as well. I'm sure you could think of lots more. I know I could, but we had 10 feet of snow last night, and that 50-mile walk to school is going to take me a while.

766 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A section for the review of books is a regular feature of 0fLandscape Journal as discussed by the authors, where the opinions and ideas expressed in the reviews are those of the reviewers and do not necessarily depict the views of the Journal editors or the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture.
Abstract: A section for the review of books is a regular feature 0fLandscape Journal. The opinions and ideas expressed in the reviews are those of the reviewers and do not necessarily depict the views of the Journal’s editors or the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture. Suggestions for books to be reviewed are always welcome, as are comments regarding the reviews published. All correspondence should be sent to the Book Review editors:

753 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors map post-socialist farmland abandonment in Western Ukraine using Landsat images from 1986 to 2008, and identify spatial determinants of abandonment using a combination of best-subsets linear regression models and hierarchical partitioning.

363 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Mr. Burger, thank you for agreeing to this interview, and first I just wanted to begin by asking you about your childhood, where you were born, where he grew up, things like that.
Abstract: Sokiera: This is an interview for the Oral History and Cultural Heritage Center at The University of Southern Mississippi. It is eleven o’clock on November 8, 2012. My name is Jason Sokiera, and I am at the home of Mr. Richard Burger. Mr. Burger, thank you for agreeing to this interview. And first I just wanted to begin by asking you about your childhood, where you were born, where you grew up, things like that.

356 citations