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Arie Schippers

Bio: Arie Schippers is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Arabic literature & Poetry. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 12 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The use of Arabic themes in Hebrew Andalusian poetry is discussed in this article, focusing on the four main poets Samuel Ha-Nagid, Solomon Ibn Gabirol, Moses Ibn Ezra and Yehuda Ha-Lewi.
Abstract: Offers an introduction to the history of the Jews of the Iberian peninsula and the political situation of Muslim Spain during the 11th century as well as an introduction to Arabic poetry, its genres and poetical theory, and the relation between Arabic poetry from the East and that of al-Andalus. This book deals extensively with the different Arabic poetic genres and their Hebrew equivalents, focusing on the four main poets Samuel Ha-Nagid, Solomon Ibn Gabirol, Moses Ibn Ezra and Yehuda Ha-Lewi. At the end conclusions are drawn about the use of Arabic themes in Hebrew Andalusian poetry.

12 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Aug 2000

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A survey of works in the languages of medieval Iberia shows that the medieval rhetorical portrait synthesized a widely shared ideal of female beauty which coincides with today's male perceptions of female attractiveness, and is consistent with evolved psychological preferences.
Abstract: Medieval literature often used stock descriptions of beautiful women following a well-established rhetorical canon which included expressions such as "golden hair," "sparkling eyes," or "skin whiter than snow." But were these terms mere rhetorical conventions derived from Latin poetry, as generally accepted by medieval scholars? And what happens if we examine these descriptions at the "literal" level of interpretation? This survey of works in the languages of medieval Iberia shows that the medieval rhetorical portrait synthesized a widely shared ideal of female beauty which coincides with today's male perceptions of female attractiveness, and is consistent with evolved psychological preferences.

9 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Aug 2000
TL;DR: Ibn Ezra as discussed by the authors was a Hebrew poet of the Hebrew Golden Age in al-Andalus whose poetry most resembles that of an Arabic poet, reflecting the interests of the Jewish aristocrats of his age.
Abstract: Of all the Arabized poets of the Hebrew Golden Age in al-Andalus, Moses (Abū Hārān) Ibn Ezra is the one whose poetry most resembles that of an Arabic poet. Yet his literary career was more varied than that of most Arabic poets, reflecting the interests of the Jewish aristocrats of his age. The interplay of Arabo-Islamic and Jewish elements, a fascinating feature of the lives and careers of all the leading Hebrew poets of al-Andalus, is so fully developed in him as to render him a model case of an Andalusian Jewish intellectual. Ibn Ezra’s life is known only in outline (Ibn Ezra, Selected Poems xxiii–xxxix; Schirmann 380–420). He was born in Granada, around 1055, to a distinguished family, several of whose members were, like Samuel and Joseph Ibn Nagrila in the preceding generation, in the service of Ḥabbūs and Bādīs of Granada. Moses’ elder brother Isaac (Abū Ibrāhīm) seems to have been married to one of the Nagid’s daughters. As a young man, Moses studied at the academy of Lucena, training ground for many of al-Andalus’s courtierrabbis. The academy was headed at the time by Rabbi Isaac Ibn Ghiyāth, the premier rabbinic authority of al-Andalus and the premier liturgical poet of his generation.

6 citations