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Author

Arthur C. Danto

Other affiliations: University of Minnesota
Bio: Arthur C. Danto is an academic researcher from Columbia University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Contemporary art & Analytic philosophy. The author has an hindex of 30, co-authored 129 publications receiving 4676 citations. Previous affiliations of Arthur C. Danto include University of Minnesota.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1981
TL;DR: In the present state of the art world, it is possible that a painting can be exhibited which is merely a square of primed canvas, or a sculpture shown which consists of a box, of undistinguished carpentry, coated with a banal tan chemtone applied casually with a roller as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: IN THE PRESENT STATE of the artworld, it is possible that a painting be exhibited which is merely a square of primed canvas, or a sculpture shown which consists of a box, of undistinguished carpentry, coated with a banal tan chemtone applied casually with a roller. Such works may be scored as largely empty, as indeed they are when we contrast the former with The Legend of the True Cross by Piero della Francesca, or the latter with the Apollo Belvedere. Yet the painting is not empty in the way in which a square of primed canvas, indiscernible from our work, may be: an empty canvas awaiting an Annunciation, say; or the way in which a crate indiscernible from our sculpture may be, which awaits a cargo of bric-a-brac and a bill of lading. For "empty" as applied to our works is an aesthetic and critical judgment, presupposing that its subjects are artworks already, however inscrutable may be the differences between them and objects which, since not artworks, reject such predicates as a class. Our works are titled "Untitled." This is a title of sorts rather than a mere statement of fact, as it sometimes is when an artist neglects to give his work a title and it enters the catalogue raisonne unbaptized. So are those mere objects untitled which happen not to be discernible from our works, but

445 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Princeton Classics Edition as discussed by the authors is a collection of illustrations from the Princeton Museum of Modern, Post-Modern, and Contemporary Art with a focus on the history of art and its development.
Abstract: List of Illustrations ix Foreword to the Princeton Classics Edition xi Preface xvii Acknowledgments xxi CHAPTER ONE Introduction: Modern, Postmodern, and Contemporary 3 CHAPTER TWO Three Decades after the End of Art 21 CHAPTER THREE Master Narratives and Critical Principles 41 CHAPTER FOUR Modernism and the Critique of Pure Art: The Historical Vision of Clement Greenberg 61 CHAPTER FIVE From Aesthetics to Art Criticism 81 CHAPTER SIX Painting and the Pale of History: The Passing of the Pure 101 CHAPTER SEVEN Pop Art and Past Futures 117 CHAPTER EIGHT Painting, Politics, and Post-Hisotrical Art 135 CHAPTER NINE The Historical Museum of Monochrome Art 153 CHAPTER TEN Museums and the Thirsting Millions 175 CHAPTER ELEVEN Modalities of History: Possibility and Comedy 193 Index 221

384 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A survey of works of art can be found in this article, with a focus on metaphorical, expression, and style aspects of art and their relationship to metaphorical content and causality.
Abstract: *1. Works of Art and Mere Real Things *2. Content and Causation *3. Philosophy and Art *4. Aesthetics and the Work of Art *5. Interpretation and Identification *6. Works of Art and Mere Representations *7. Metaphor, Expression, and Style * Index

339 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A survey of works of art can be found in this paper, with a focus on metaphorical, expression, and style aspects of art and their relationship to metaphorical content and causality.
Abstract: *1. Works of Art and Mere Real Things *2. Content and Causation *3. Philosophy and Art *4. Aesthetics and the Work of Art *5. Interpretation and Identification *6. Works of Art and Mere Representations *7. Metaphor, Expression, and Style * Index

260 citations

Book
01 Jul 1985

257 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: Hornstein this article discusses the Biological Basis of Language Capacities and Language and Unconscious Knowledge Notes Index (LUCI) for language and unconscious knowledge in the context of natural language processing.
Abstract: Foreword by Norbert Hornstein Preface Part I 1 Mind and Body 2 Structures, Capacities, and Conventions 3 Knowledge of Grammar 4 Some Elements of Grammar Part II 5 On the Biological Basis of Language Capacities 6 Language and Unconscious Knowledge Notes Index

2,930 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: Wegner as mentioned in this paper argues that the feeling of conscious will is created by the mind and brain and that it serves as a guide to understanding ourselves and to developing a sense of responsibility and morality.
Abstract: Do we consciously cause our actions, or do they happen to us? Philosophers, psychologists, neuroscientists, theologians, and lawyers have long debated the existence of free will versus determinism. In this book Daniel Wegner offers a novel understanding of the issue. Like actions, he argues, the feeling of conscious will is created by the mind and brain. Yet if psychological and neural mechanisms are responsible for all human behavior, how could we have conscious will? The feeling of conscious will, Wegner shows, helps us to appreciate and remember our authorship of the things our minds and bodies do. Yes, we feel that we consciously will our actions, Wegner says, but at the same time, our actions happen to us. Although conscious will is an illusion, it serves as a guide to understanding ourselves and to developing a sense of responsibility and morality. Approaching conscious will as a topic of psychological study, Wegner examines the issue from a variety of angles. He looks at illusions of the will -- those cases where people feel that they are willing an act that they are not doing or, conversely, are not willing an act that they in fact are doing. He explores conscious will in hypnosis, Ouija board spelling, automatic writing, and facilitated communication, as well as in such phenomena as spirit possession, dissociative identity disorder, and trance channeling. The result is a book that sidesteps endless debates to focus, more fruitfully, on the impact on our lives of the illusion of conscious will.

1,814 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Action identification theory as discussed by the authors proposes that any action can be identified in many ways, ranging from low-level identities that specify how the action is performed to high level identities that signify why or with what effect it is performed, and the level of identification most likely to be adopted by an actor is determined by processes reflecting a trade-off between concerns for comprehen- sive action understanding and effective action maintenance.
Abstract: Issues in the cognitive representation and control of action are broached from the perspective of action identification theory. This theory holds that any action can be identified in many ways, ranging from low-level identities that specify how the action is performed to high-level identities that signify why or with what effect the action is performed. The level of identification most likely to be adopted by an actor is said to be dictated by processes reflecting a trade-off between concerns for comprehen- sive action understanding and effective action maintenance. This means that the actor is always sensitive to contextual cues to higher levels of identification but moves to lower levels ofidentification if the action proves difficult to maintain with higher level identities in mind. These respective pro- cesses are documented empirically, as is their coordinated interplay in promoting a level of prepotent identification that matches the upper limits of the actor's capacity to perform the action. The im- plications of this analysis are developed for action stability, the psychology of performance impair- ment, personal versus situational causation, and the behavioral bases of self-understanding. People always seem to be doing something. They also seem for seemingly unbounded constructions of behavior. As philos- to be quite adept at identifying what they are doing. What is less ophers have long noted, any segment of behavior can be con- clear is how these two observations relate to one another. The sciously identified in many different ways (Anscombe, 1957; theory of action identification (Vallacher & Wegner, 1985; Weg- Austin, 1961; Danto, 1963; Goldman, 1970; Ryie, 1949; Witt- ner & Vallacher, 1986) is explicitly concerned with this issue. At genstein, 1953). Something as simple as "meeting someone," the heart of the theory are three interacting processes that spec- for instance, could be recognized by anyone with an even mildly ify a causal interdependence between what people are doing and active mental life as "being social," "exchanging pleasantries," what they think they are doing. Through a delineation of these "learning about someone new," "revealing one's personality," processes, we hope to reveal how action constrains one's identi- or even "uttering words." But while representations of action fication of action and, in turn, how action identification exerts a admit to considerable variability and seem subject to notewor- selecting and guiding force in subsequent action. The proposed thy change from moment to moment, behavior seems to follow causal interdependence between action and action identifica- a more constrained path, often exhibiting a press toward COIn- tion proves useful in understanding a host of issues in human pletion in the face of situational forces, biological needs, and psychology that center on the mental control of action. These reinforcement contingencies. Thus, as interesting as cognitive issues are thus discussed in detail, with attention given in each representations may be in their own right, they are considered case to the points of contact between our analysis and prior con- by many to operate independently of the causal mechanisms ceptualizations. We begin by reviewing the background and promoting overt action. principles of the theory.

1,730 citations