scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Arthur Christensen

Bio: Arthur Christensen is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 119 citations.

Papers
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1944

121 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The economic system of the Ottoman Empire and its basic economic principles derived from a traditional view of state and society which had prevailed since antiquity in the empires of the Near East.
Abstract: The economic system of the Ottoman Empire and its basic economic principles derived from a traditional view of state and society which had prevailed since antiquity in the empires of the Near East. This theory, since it determined the attitude and policy of the administrators, was of considerable practical importance.

205 citations

Book
13 Aug 1999
TL;DR: Elam: what, when, where, environment, climate, and resources as mentioned in this paper The immediate precursors of Elam 4. Elam and Awan 5. The dynasty of Shimashki 6. The kingdom of Susa and Anshan 8. The Neo-Elamite period 9. Elymais 11. Eemen under the Sasanians and beyond 12. Conclusion
Abstract: 1. Elam: what, when, where? 2. Environment, climate, and resources 3. The immediate precursors of Elam 4. Elam and Awan 5. The dynasty of Shimashki 6. The grand regents of Elam and Susa 7. The kingdom of Susa and Anshan 8. The Neo-Elamite period 9. Elam in the Achaemenid empire 10. Elymais 11. Elam under the Sasanians and beyond 12. Conclusion.

182 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a list of abbreviations for the Church: 1. "What Has the Emperor to Do with the Church?" Persecution and Martyrdom from Diocletian to Constantine 2. "The God of the Martyrs Refuses You": Religious Violence, Political Discourse, and Christian Identity in the Century after Constantine 3. An Eye for an Eye: Religious Violence in Donatist Africa 4. Temperata Severitas: Augustine, the State, and Disciplinary Violence 5. "There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ": Holy
Abstract: Preface and Acknowledgments List of Abbreviations Introduction 1. "What Has the Emperor to Do with the Church?" Persecution and Martyrdom from Diocletian to Constantine 2. "The God of the Martyrs Refuses You": Religious Violence, Political Discourse, and Christian Identity in the Century after Constantine 3. An Eye for an Eye: Religious Violence in Donatist Africa 4. Temperata Severitas: Augustine, the State, and Disciplinary Violence 5. "There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ": Holy Men and Holy Violence in the Late Fourth and Early Fifth Centuries 6. "The Monks Commit Many Crimes": Holy Violence Contested 7. "Sanctify Thy Hand by the Blow": Problematizing Episcopal Power 8. Non Iudicium sed Latrocinium: Of Holy Synods and Robber Councils Conclusion Bibliography Index

157 citations

Book
25 Apr 1985
TL;DR: A new epoch opened after Athens lost an army and fleet before Syracuse in Sicily as mentioned in this paper, and the Greek objectives were now to deny forward positions to the enemy, should Xerxes try again; to reopen trade-routes, and, in Homeric style, revenge.
Abstract: Before Cyrus marched against Croesus, he had made overtures to the Asian Greeks, of whom the Ionians were the most important. the tragic incompatibility and failure of understanding between Persia, the highest manifestation of oriental imperialism, and the still developing bourgeois culture of the Greek cities. Cyrus' son Cambyses, continuing his father's agenda, in 525 assailed Egypt, and as a prelude to this, a great matter, for which his courtiers praised him, he 'won the sea'. Mardonios pressed on to where his fresh army and fleet awaited him, at the crossing into Europe. Greek objectives were now to deny forward positions to the enemy, should Xerxes try again; to reopen trade-routes, and, in Homeric style, revenge. Even during the great wars, but much more as the dust of conflict settled, Greeks and Persians were getting to know each other as human beings. A new epoch opened after Athens lost an army and fleet before Syracuse in Sicily.

147 citations

Book
13 Sep 2007
TL;DR: Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD as mentioned in this paper, a chronological survey of the Sasanian Empire and its relations with the Roman Empire, is presented in this book.
Abstract: Part I. Narrative: 1. Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD 2. Rome and the Sasanian Empire - a chronological survey Part II. Sources and Contexts: 3. Political goals 4. Warfare 5. Military confrontations 6. The diplomatic solutions 7. Arabia between the great powers 8. Shared interests - continuing conflicts 9. Religion - Christianity and Zoroastrianism 10. Emperor and King of Kings 11. Exchange of information between West and East Part III. Appendices.

132 citations