scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Asghar Seyed-Gohrab

Bio: Asghar Seyed-Gohrab is an academic researcher from Leiden University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Persian literature & Zoroastrianism. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 13 publications receiving 48 citations.

Papers
More filters
MonographDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The Rubaiyat by the Persian poet ‘Umar Khayyaem (1048-1131) is used in contemporary Iran as a resistance literature, symbolizing the secularist voice in cultural debates.
Abstract: The Rubaiyat by the Persian poet ‘Umar Khayyaem (1048-1131) is used in contemporary Iran as a resistance literature, symbolizing the secularist voice in cultural debates While Islamic fundamentalists criticize Khayyaem as an atheist and materialist philosopher who questions God’s creation and the promise of reward or punishment in the hereafter, secularist intellectuals see in him an example of a scientist who scrutinizes the mysteries of the world Others see a spiritual master, a Sufi, who guides people to the truth This volume collects eighteen essays on the history of the reception of ‘Umar Khayyaem in various literary traditions, exploring how his philosophy of doubt, carpe diem, hedonism, and in vino veritas has inspired generations of poets, novelists, painters, musicians, calligraphers and film-makers

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Tahmineh and Rostam episode is compared vis-a-vis both the pre-modern scribal interventions in the manuscript tradition of the poem, as well as two oral presentations of the same episode by traditional storytellers, as preserved in their prompt-books (tumārs) and in recorded performances from the twentieth century.
Abstract: The Tahmineh and Rostam episode, as presented in modern text-critical editions of Ferdowsi's Shahnameh, is compared vis-a-vis both the pre-modern scribal interventions in the manuscript tradition of the poem, as well as two oral presentations of the same episode by traditional storytellers (naqqālān), as preserved in their prompt-books (tumārs) and in recorded performances from the twentieth century. The mise-en-scene, the social circmstances, as well as the expansive nature of such oral performances, are described, and a translation of an oral version of the Rostam and Tahmineh episode is given. The narrative strategies employed to negotiate the intersection of new episodes or contemporary moralistic considerations with the written text of Ferdowsi's Shahnameh are then explored, analyzing the nature, motivations and functions of the scribal and oral interpolations to the Tahmineh episode, and demonstrating how modernizing reinterpretations impart a certain dynamism to the living Shāhnāmeh tradition. The ...

5 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus mainly on Persian rhetorical devices, especially imagery and metaphors, and theories about them, and give a theoretical appraisal of metaphors and then discuss the famous quatrains of Umar Khayyām and the various ways they have been rendered into English.
Abstract: This introductory chapter of the book focuses mainly on Persian rhetorical devices, especially imagery and metaphors, and theories about them. From the outset of Persian literature in the tenth century, authors have used various literary devices to embellish their writings, and to make them more persuasive, while Persian rhetoricians wrote rules for making such devices, in both Arabic and Persian. The importance of the use of these devices is emphasized in various poetic manuals. A poem without literary embellishments would be considered inelegant. The chapter has three articles which deal with transcultural aspects of literature. The author first gives a theoretical appraisal of metaphors, and then discusses the famous quatrains of Umar Khayyām and the various ways they have been rendered into English. Keywords:metaphors; Persian rhetorical devices

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the formal generic characteristics of such debates, showing how the form of the debate is rather appropriate to let forbidden objects or ideas, in this case the wine, speak for themselves thus defending their position in an Islamic society.
Abstract: As everyone knows, alcoholic drinks, including wine, are forbidden by Islam. Readers of Persian poetry often wonder how is it possible that Persian wine literature is one of the richest in the world and whether the poets and authors ever address the illicitness of the wine in their works. This article examines how one author, Zangī Bukhārī, presents a catalogue of positive and negative qualities of wine in his Gul u mul (“The Rose and the Wine”). Through the genre of debate (munāzara), he shows how a courtly audience may have tried to justify the drinking of wine. The article examines the formal generic characteristics of such debates, showing how the form of the debate is rather appropriate to let forbidden objects or ideas, in this case the wine, speak for themselves thus defending their position in an Islamic society. entertaining in is richness in metaphors and imagery used by the wine and the rose to voice their superiority to each other, but it also addresses a rather controversial topic in an uncon...

5 citations


Cited by
More filters
01 Jan 2016

113 citations

Book
04 Jul 2019
TL;DR: This article made a case for Hamlet as the world's most frequently filmed text, and using specially commissioned interviews with cast, directors and screenwriters, they discussed films from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East.
Abstract: 'Hamlet' and World Cinema reveals a rich history of cinematic production extending across the globe. Making a case for Hamlet as the world's most frequently filmed text, and using specially commissioned interviews with cast, directors and screenwriters, it discusses films from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. The book argues that the play has been taken up by filmmakers world-wide to allegorise the energies, instabilities, traumas and expectations that have defined the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In so doing, it rejects the Anglophone focus which has dominated criticism up to now and explores instead the multiple constituencies that have claimed Shakespeare's most celebrated work as their own. 'Hamlet' and World Cinema uncovers a vital part of the adaptation story. This book facilitates a fresh understanding of Shakespeare's cinematic significance and newly highlights Hamlet's political and aesthetic instrumentality in a vast range of local and global contexts.

55 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2020
Abstract: .................................................................................................................................................. v List of Figures ........................................................................................................................................ xii Language and transliteration ............................................................................................................... xiii Glossary ................................................................................................................................................ xvi

37 citations

18 Oct 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the main question of how to interpret Ayatollah Khomeini's mystical poetry is discussed. But the main point of this paper is not to interpret these unorthodox poems by the hand of the founder of Iran, but to explain the paradox of his personality.
Abstract: This research has been conducted in response to the mystical poems that Ayatollah Khomeini composed during his life. His poems contain multiple mystical topics such as wine, love, annihilation and adoration of non-Islamic figures. In various poems Ayatollah Khomeini rejects the Kaʿba, the Holy House of God in Mecca. How to interpret these unorthodox poems by the hand of the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran? How to explain the paradox of his personality? His poems are also highly interesting because of their biographical and political elements, such as his references to the Iran-Iraq war. The main question of this research is how to interpret Ayatollah Khomeini’s mystical poetry. Are his poems the expressions of a convinced mystic, or did he copy this poetic framework for other purposes? How to interpret his poems in which he rejects Islamic institutions, such as the Kaʿba in Mecca? Is this topic merely a classical metaphor or does it reflect the personal problems he had with Saudi Arabia? And finally, how did his opponents and his followers respond to his poetry?

21 citations

Dissertation
11 Apr 2014
TL;DR: This article examined the influence of Arabic learning in the related fields of medicine, natural philosophy, astrology and alchemy, disseminated through Latin translations from the Iberian Peninsula in particular, and found that Chaucer adopts a condemnatory attitude toward the religious milieu that gave birth to these achievements, grounded in the contemporary context of the later crusades.
Abstract: This thesis examines the influence of Arabic learning, in Latin translations, on Chaucer’s oeuvre. That Chaucer drew on Arabic sources has long been acknowledged by Chaucerians, but there has been little scholarly engagement with them, particularly in relation to his highly technical, diagnostic concept of fin’ amors. This study demonstrates Chaucer’s portrayal of fin’ amors is informed by Arabic learning in the related fields of medicine, natural philosophy, astrology and alchemy, disseminated through Latin translations from the Iberian Peninsula in particular. This study demonstrates that whilst Chaucer has the utmost respect for the scholarly achievements of the Islamic world, he adopts a condemnatory attitude toward the religious milieu that gave birth to these achievements, grounded in the contemporary context of the later crusades. Chapter One considers the influence of Arabic medical texts on Chaucer’s diagnosis of amor hereos, love as a life-threatening illness, in Troilus and Criseyde and the Knight’s Tale. Chapter Two examines Aristotelian natural philosophy and the effect of the 1277 Condemnations at the University of Paris on the genesis of love as a cerebral illness. Chapter Three turns to the diagnostic aspect of Arabic astronomy evinced in the Treatise on the Astrolabe, focusing on judicial astrology and saturnine melancholia in the Knight’s Tale. Chapter Four concentrates on the technical transmission of Arabic alchemical sources in the Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale, which act as a metaphor for fin’ amors. Chapter Five examines Chaucer’s dichotomous attitude toward Arabic learning and Islam as a religion.

17 citations