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Avi Hofstein

Bio: Avi Hofstein is an academic researcher from Weizmann Institute of Science. The author has contributed to research in topics: Science education & Chemistry education. The author has an hindex of 42, co-authored 136 publications receiving 9243 citations.


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TL;DR: Hofstein and Lunetta as mentioned in this paper conducted a review of the research on the school science laboratory and found that the laboratory has a central and distinctive role in science education, and science educators have suggested that rich benefits in learning accrue from using laboratory activities.
Abstract: The laboratory has been given a central and distinctive role in science education, and science educators have suggested that rich benefits in learning accrue from using laboratory activities. Twenty years have been elapsed since we published a frequently cited, critical review of the research on the school science laboratory (Hofstein & Lunetta, Rev. Educ. Res.52(2), 201–217, 1982). Twenty years later, we are living in an era of dramatic new technology resources and new standards in science education in which learning by inquiry has been given renewed central status. Methodologies for research and assessment that have developed in the last 20 years can help researchers seeking to understand how science laboratory resources are used, how students' work in the laboratory is assessed, and how science laboratory activities can be used by teachers to enhance intended learning outcomes. In that context, we take another look at the school laboratory in the light of contemporary practices and scholarship. This analysis examines scholarship that has emerged in the past 20 years in the context of earlier scholarship, contemporary goals for science learning, current models of how students construct knowledge, and information about how teachers and students engage in science laboratory activities. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Sci Ed88:28–54, 2004; Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/.sce10106

2,084 citations

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TL;DR: A review of the history, goals, and research findings regarding the laboratory as a medium of instruction in introductory science teaching is provided in this article, with suggestions for researchers who are working to clarify the role of the laboratory in science education.
Abstract: The laboratory has been given a central and distinctive role in science education, and science educators have suggested that there are rich benefits in learning from using laboratory activities. At this time, however, some educators have begun to question seriously the effectiveness and the role of laboratory work, and the case for laboratory teaching is not as self-evident as it once seemed. This paper provides perspectives on these issues through a review of the history, goals, and research findings regarding the laboratory as a medium of instruction in introductory science teaching. The analysis of research culminates with suggestions for researchers who are working to clarify the role of the laboratory in science education.

881 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, a set emerged from an international symposium that aimed to shed light on issues associated with the enactment of inquiry both as means (i.e., inquiry as an in-constructional approach) and as ends, i.e. inquiry as a learning outcome, in precollege science classrooms.
Abstract: This paper set emerged from an international symposium that aimed to shed light on issues associated with the enactment of inquiry both as means (i.e., inquiry as an in- structional approach) and as ends (i.e., inquiry as a learning outcome) in precollege science classrooms. The symposium contributors were charged with providing perspectives from

677 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the educational effectiveness of field trips is controlled by two major factors: the field trip quality and the novelty space (or Familiarity Index), which is determined by its structure, learning materials and teaching method, and the ability to direct learning to a concrete interaction with the environment.
Abstract: This study deals with the educational effectiveness of field trips. The main purpose was to obtain insight concerning factors that might influence the ability of students to learn during a scientific field trip in a natural environment. The research was conducted in the context of a I-day geologic field trip by 296 students in Grades 9 through I1 in high schools in Israel. The study combined qualitative and quantitative research methods. Data were collected from three different sources (student, teacher, and outside observer) in three stages (before, after, and during the field trip). Using observations and questionnaires we investigated: a) the nature of student learning during the field trip, b) student attitudes toward the field trip, and c) changes in student knowledge and attitudes after the field trip. Our findings suggest that the educational effectiveness of a field trip is controlled by two major factors: the field trip quality and the “Novelty space” (or Familiarity Index). The educational quality of a field trip is determined by its structure, learning materials, and teaching method, and the ability to direct learning to a concrete interaction with the environment. The novelty space consists of three prefield variables: cognitive, psychological, and geographic. The learning performance of students whose “Novelty Space” was reduced before the field trip was significantly higher than that of students whose “Novelty Space” had not been so reduced. Thus, the former group gained significantly higher achievement and attitude levels. It is suggested that a field trip should occur early in the concrete part of the curriculum, and should be preceded by a relatively short preparatory unit that focuses on increasing familiarity with the learning setting of the field trip, thereby limiting the “Novelty Space” factors.

534 citations

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TL;DR: For more than a century, laboratory experiences have been purported to promote central science education goals including the enhancement of students' understanding of concepts in science and its applications; scientific practical skills and problem solving abilities; scientific "habits of mind"; understanding of how science and scientists work; interest and motivation as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: For more than a century, laboratory experiences have been purported to promote central science education goals including the enhancement of students' understanding of concepts in science and its applications; scientific practical skills and problem solving abilities; scientific ‘habits of mind’; understanding of how science and scientists work; interest and motivation. Now at the beginning of the 21st century it looks as if the issue regarding learning in and from the science laboratory and the laboratory in the context of teaching and learning chemistry is still relevant regarding research issues as well as developmental and implementation issues. This special CERP issue is an attempt to provide up-to-date reports from several countries around the world. [Chem. Educ. Res. Pract., 2007, 8 (2), 105-107]

396 citations


Cited by
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01 Jun 1959

3,442 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Project-based learning as discussed by the authors is a comprehensive approach to classroom teaching and learning that is designed to engage students in investigation of authentic problems, and it has the potential to help people learn.
Abstract: Project-based learning is a comprehensive approach to classroom teaching and learning that is designed to engage students in investigation of authentic problems. In this article, we present an argument for why projects have the potential to help people learn; indicate factors in project design that affect motivation and thought; examine difficulties that students and teachers may encounter with projects; and describe how technology can support students and teachers as they work on projects, so that motivation and thought are sustained.

2,962 citations

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TL;DR: The authors presented an analysis of a conceptual change model for describing student learning by applying research on student motivation to the process of conceptual change and discussed the role of classroom contextual factors as moderators of the relations between student motivation and conceptual change.
Abstract: Conceptual change models of student learning are useful for explicating the role of prior knowledge in students’ learning and are very popular in the research on learning in the subject areas. This article presents an analysis of a conceptual change model for describing student learning by applying research on student motivation to the process of conceptual change. Four general motivational constructs (goals, values, self-efficacy, and control beliefs) are suggested as potential mediators of the process of conceptual change. In addition, there is a discussion of the role of classroom contextual factors as moderators of the relations between student motivation and conceptual change. The article highlights the theoretical difficulties of a cold, or overly rational, model of conceptual change that focuses only on student cognition without considering the ways in which students’ motivational beliefs about themselves as learners and the roles of individuals in a classroom learning community can facilitate or h...

2,125 citations