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Author

Aziz Ahmad

Bio: Aziz Ahmad is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Islam & Modernism (music). The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 26 publications receiving 531 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The contrast between these two literary growths is not confined to what is classified in Western literatures as full-blown epic material, but to the epic material in general.
Abstract: MUSLIM IMPACT AND RULE in India generated two literary growths: a Muslim epic of conquest, and a Hindu epic of resistance and of psychological rejection. The two literary growths were planted in two different cultures; in two different languages, Persian and Hindi; in two mutually exclusive religious, cultural and historical attitudes each confronting the other in aggressive hostility. Each of these two literary growths developed in mutual ignorance of the other; and with the rare exception of eclectic intellectuals like Abu'l Fazl in the 16th century, or the 17th century Urdu poets of the Southern courts of Bijdp-dr and Golconda, their readership hardly ever converged. The Muslim and the Hindu epics of Medieval India can therefore hardly be described as "epic" and " counter-epic " in the context of a direct relationship of challenge and response. Yet one of them was rooted in the challenge asserting the glory of Muslim presence, and the other in the response repudiating it. In this sense one may perhaps use the term " counter-epic " for the Hindi heroic poetry of Medieval India as I have done. Also, the contrast between these two literary growths is not confined to what is classified in Western literatures as full-blown epic, but to the epic material in general. Muslim Epic of Conquest

43 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species.
Abstract: The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans.

379 citations

Book
17 Sep 1992
TL;DR: Nielsen's "Muslims in Western Europe" as discussed by the authors is a survey of the social, political and legal position of all the European Muslim communities, focusing on the "Rushdie affair" and the "affair of the headscarves" in France.
Abstract: "Muslims in Western Europe" is a country-by-country survey of the social, political and legal position of all the European Muslim communities. Jorgen Nielsen describes how the "Rushdie affair" in Britain and the "affair of the headscarves" in France have contradicted 1970s expectations of complete integration. In clear terms he shows the reader how Muslim communities have developed differently in each country, and compares the origins, ethnic composition, distribution and organizational patterns in each, as well as the political, legal and cultural context in which they have found their way. It covers all the European countries and there are thematic chapters on family, law and culture, and organizaton.

278 citations

Book
26 May 2003
TL;DR: This paper argued that Southeast Asia, Europe, Japan, China, and South Asia all embodied idiosyncratic versions of a Eurasian-wide pattern whereby local isolates cohered to form ever larger, more stable, more complex political and cultural systems.
Abstract: Blending fine-grained case studies with overarching theory, this book seeks both to integrate Southeast Asia into world history and to rethink much of Eurasia's premodern past. It argues that Southeast Asia, Europe, Japan, China, and South Asia all embodied idiosyncratic versions of a Eurasian-wide pattern whereby local isolates cohered to form ever larger, more stable, more complex political and cultural systems. With accelerating force, climatic, commercial, and military stimuli joined to produce patterns of linear-cum-cyclic construction that became remarkably synchronized even between regions that had no contact with one another. Yet this study also distinguishes between two zones of integration, one where indigenous groups remained in control and a second where agency gravitated to external conquest elites. Here, then, is a fundamentally original view of Eurasia during a 1,000-year period that speaks to both historians of individual regions and those interested in global trends.

236 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the three partitions of 1947 are discussed and the evidence of the historian is presented. But the authors do not discuss the role of the author in the partition process.
Abstract: Acknowledgements List of abbreviations 1. By way of introduction 2. The three partitions of 1947 3. Historians' history 4. The evidence of the historian 5. Folding the local into the national: Garhmukhteshwar, November 1946 6. Folding the national into the local: Delhi, 1947-8 7. Disciplining difference 8. Constructing community Select bibliography Index.

213 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: How mouse genetics can be used to discover diabetes-related genes is described, how the mouse strains differ in their diabetes- related phenotypes is summarized, and several examples of how loci identified in the mouse may directly relate to human diabetes are described.
Abstract: Inbred mouse strains provide genetic diversity comparable to that of the human population. Like humans, mice have a wide range of diabetes-related phenotypes. The inbred mouse strains differ in the response of their critical physiological functions, such as insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, β-cell proliferation and survival, and fuel partitioning, to diet and obesity. Most of the critical genes underlying these differences have not been identified, although many loci have been mapped. The dramatic improvements in genomic and bioinformatics resources are accelerating the pace of gene discovery. This review describes how mouse genetics can be used to discover diabetes-related genes, summarizes how the mouse strains differ in their diabetes-related phenotypes, and describes several examples of how loci identified in the mouse may directly relate to human diabetes.

203 citations