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B. Boender

Bio: B. Boender is an academic researcher from NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Genocide. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 7 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 2011, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) issued a report that summarised the fruits of experience and stimulated consideration of security strategies for aid providers.
Abstract: Attacks on health workers, clinics, hospitals, ambulances and patients during periods of armed conflict or civil disturbance pose enormous challenges to humanitarian response and constitute affronts to the imperatives of human rights and civilian protection. Violence inflicted on humanitarian aid workers is gaining the global attention it warrants. While the number of attacks on aid workers has decreased in recent years, in a handful of places, notably Sudan, Afghanistan, and Somalia, they have become more spectacular and frightening, with aid agencies targeted for kidnapping and subjected to use of explosives because of their perceived affiliation with Western governments. The assaults have galvanised the humanitarian aid community to track attacks and to engage in intensive and sophisticated discussion of means to increase operational security. After worldwide consultation, in 2011 the United Nations (UN) Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) issued a report that summarised the fruits of experience and stimulated consideration of security strategies for aid providers. By contrast, however, until very recently the far larger number of incidents of violence inflicted on and interference with indigenous health services and on international and local development agencies by state and armed groups has received comparatively little attention.

38 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the concept of humanitarianism is defined as the "conceptual definition of humanitarians" and discussed in terms of political realism, altruism, and international society.
Abstract: ........................................................................................................................................... iv LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS .................................................................................................................... vii KEY TERMS .......................................................................................................................................... ix CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Background to the Study ......................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Statement of the Problem ........................................................................................................ 3 1.3 Hypothesis .............................................................................................................................. 4 1.4 Preliminary Literature Study and Reasons for Choosing the Topic .......................................... 4 1.5 Research Objectives ................................................................................................................ 9 1.6 Research Questions ................................................................................................................ 9 1.7 Principal Theories upon which the Research is Constructed ................................................. 10 1.7.1 Political Realism ............................................................................................................ 10 1.7.2 Altruism ......................................................................................................................... 11 1.7.3 International Society ....................................................................................................... 12 1.8 Methodology .......................................................................................................................... 13 1.9 Limitations of the Study ......................................................................................................... 15 1.10 Structure of the Dissertation .................................................................................................. 16 CHAPTER 2: CONCEPTUAL DEFINITION OF HUMANITARIANISM ....................................................... 18 2.

23 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2015
Abstract: of the Dissertation .............................................................................................. i Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................... iv List of Acronyms ............................................................................................................. xii Chapter One: Introduction: Rationales and Theoretical Frameworks ........................1 Rationales of the Study .....................................................................................................1 Thesis Statement and Questions .......................................................................................7 Theoretical frameworks ....................................................................................................9 Theory of Globalization ................................................................................................9 Theory of Vernacularization .......................................................................................10 Terminology ...................................................................................................................11 What is Genocide? ......................................................................................................12 Genocide Education ....................................................................................................18 Global Genocide Education ........................................................................................20 Local Genocide Education Initiatives .........................................................................22 Research Design and Methodology ................................................................................23 Qualitative Study .........................................................................................................23 Desk Research .............................................................................................................24 Archival Research .......................................................................................................24 Classroom Observations ..............................................................................................25 Risk Assessments and Risk Control ............................................................................26 Organization of the Dissertation .....................................................................................27 Chapter Two: Global Genocide Education and Vernacularization ............................30 The Developments of Holocaust Education ...................................................................30 The Slow Revival ........................................................................................................32 Holocaust Centrality ....................................................................................................37 Holocaust Universalization .........................................................................................42 Global Genocide Education Values Packages ................................................................51 Genocide Prevention: 'Never Again' ...........................................................................52 Collective Memory ......................................................................................................53 Universal Human Rights .............................................................................................55 Vernacularization: Local Adoptions of the Global Practices .........................................57 Rwanda Case ...............................................................................................................58 South Africa Case ........................................................................................................65 Conclusion ......................................................................................................................68 Chapter Three: The Politics of Teaching Cambodian Genocide in Its Aftermath ....72 Historical, Political and Social Background of the PRK Regime ..................................73 Background of Cambodian Education System ...............................................................83 Rehabilitating the Education System after the Genocide ...............................................85

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Feb 2020
TL;DR: A ideologia nazista surgiu apos a Primeira Guerra Mundial a partir de caracteristicas politicas, economicas, sociais e ate mesmo cientificas singulares da Alemanha naquele periodo as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: A ideologia nazista surgiu apos a Primeira Guerra Mundial a partir de caracteristicas politicas, economicas, sociais e ate mesmo cientificas singulares da Alemanha naquele periodo. Por isso, o presente artigo tem como objetivo responder a seguinte questao-problema: “como se formou o ideario politico nazista?”. Para tanto, foi realizada uma pesquisa em livros e artigos cientificos avaliados por pares e indexados, constituindo um trabalho de revisao bibliografica de cunho qualitativo, que levara em conta tambem experiencias vividas por Hitler antes deste se tornar politico. Conclui-se, ao fim, que o ideario nazista foi construido a partir de alguns fatos como a humilhacao alema pos-guerra, a rejeicao ao comunismo, a popularizacao de teorias pseudocientificas pautadas no darwinismo social e a crenca na superioridade da raca ariana.

4 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the Armenian Genocide, which is still disputed by the Turkish government and still not offi cially recognized as a genocide by the United States government and others.
Abstract: K e y w o r d s : Armenian Genocide, transnational memory, constructivism, international norms, international law. It is often argued that the current international human rights regime is rooted in the trauma of the Holocaust, which has become an archetypal symbol of largescale violations of human rights. There is a vast body of literature exploring the ways in which the Holocaust affected the development of human rights regime (Kiernan, 2007; Levy and Sznaider, 2010; Power, 2013). The ways in which other genocides, especially disputed or “unresolved” ones in which the perpetrators avoided punishment, have affected this regime are much less researched (the exceptions include Bassiouni (1996); Dadrian (1998a, 1998b, 1998c)). Here I address this question by focusing on the Armenian Genocide, which is still disputed by the Turkish government and still not offi cially recognized as a genocide by the United States government and others. The perpetrators of this

4 citations