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B. D. Nichols

Bio: B. D. Nichols is an academic researcher from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The author has contributed to research in topics: Free surface & Surface (mathematics). The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 4 publications receiving 10136 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the concept of a fractional volume of fluid (VOF) has been used to approximate free boundaries in finite-difference numerical simulations, which is shown to be more flexible and efficient than other methods for treating complicated free boundary configurations.

11,567 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, complete free surface stress conditions have been incorporated into a numerical technique for computing transient, incompressible fluid flows, and an easy to apply scheme, based on a new surface pressure interpolation, permits the normal stress to be applied at the correct free surface location.

189 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a solution algorithm based on the Marker-and-Cell method, and the flow may be calculated around variously shaped and spaced obstacles that are fully submerged or penetrate the surface.

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simple modification is described that may be used to add limited compressibility effects to incompressible hydrodynamics computer codes and it is shown that the use of an artificially reduced speed of sound is not a good approximation for low speed fluid problems.

41 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the concept of a fractional volume of fluid (VOF) has been used to approximate free boundaries in finite-difference numerical simulations, which is shown to be more flexible and efficient than other methods for treating complicated free boundary configurations.

11,567 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a force density proportional to the surface curvature of constant color is defined at each point in the transition region; this force-density is normalized in such a way that the conventional description of surface tension on an interface is recovered when the ratio of local transition-reion thickness to local curvature radius approaches zero.

7,863 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) method is extended to deal with free surface incompressible flows, and examples are given of its application to a breaking dam, a bore, the simulation of a wave maker, and the propagation of waves towards a beach.

2,889 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a method to simulate unsteady multi-fluid flows in which a sharp interface or a front separates incompressible fluids of different density and viscosity is described.

2,340 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the formation of droplet clouds or sprays that subsequently burn in combustion chambers, which is caused by interfacial instabilities, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.
Abstract: The numerical simulation of flows with interfaces and free-surface flows is a vast topic, with applications to domains as varied as environment, geophysics, engineering, and fundamental physics. In engineering, as well as in other disciplines, the study of liquid-gas interfaces is important in combustion problems with liquid and gas reagents. The formation of droplet clouds or sprays that subsequently burn in combustion chambers originates in interfacial instabilities, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. What can numerical simulations do to improve our understanding of these phenomena? The limitations of numerical techniques make it impossible to consider more than a few droplets or bubbles. They also force us to stay at low Reynolds or Weber numbers, which prevent us from finding a direct solution to the breakup problem. However, these methods are potentially important. First, the continuous improvement of computational power (or, what amounts to the same, the drop in megaflop price) continuously extends the range of affordable problems. Second, and more importantly, the phenomena we consider often happen on scales of space and time where experimental visualization is difficult or impossible. In such cases, numerical simulation may be a useful prod to the intuition of the physicist, the engineer, or the mathematician. A typical example of interfacial flow is the collision between two liquid droplets. Finding the flow involves the study not only of hydrodynamic fields in the air and water phases but also of the air-water interface. This latter part

1,949 citations