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B. Pavlakovic

Bio: B. Pavlakovic is an academic researcher from University of Nottingham. The author has contributed to research in topics: Reflection (physics) & Dispersion (water waves). The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 4 publications receiving 668 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the effect of pipe size, defect size, guided wave mode and frequency on the reflection from notches was analyzed for a 3-in. schedule 40 steel pipe.
Abstract: Ultrasonic guided waves are used for the rapid screening of pipelines in service and simple, standard testing procedures are already defined. The implementation of the method enables the localization of the defects along the length of the pipe and offers a rough estimate of defect size. In this article we present a systematic analysis of the effect of pipe size, defect size, guided wave mode and frequency on the reflection from notches. The maximum and minimum value of the reflection coefficient at varying axial extent are identified and used for the purpose of defect sizing. Maps of reflection coefficient as a function of the circumferential extent and depth of the defect are presented for a 3 in. schedule 40 steel pipe. An approximate formula, which allows these results to be extrapolated to other pipe sizes, is proposed and evaluated.

253 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Jun 2001
TL;DR: Instrumentation for long range, guided wave inspection of pipework is now commercially available and as mentioned in this paper discusses the principles of the method and reviews the results of site experience, which was originally designed to work on pipes that were either un-coated or covered with, for example, epoxy paint.
Abstract: Instrumentation for long range, guided wave inspection of pipework is now commercially available. This paper discusses the principles of the method and reviews the results of site experience. The technique was originally designed to work on pipes that were either un-coated or covered with, for example, epoxy paint. Recent tests have shown promising results with more attenuative coatings and these are discussed.

240 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Instrumentation for long range, guided wave inspection of pipework is now commercially available and as discussed by the authors discusses the principles of the method and reviews the results of site experience, which was originally designed to work on pipes that were either un-coated or covered with, for example, epoxy paint.
Abstract: Instrumentation for long range, guided wave inspection of pipework is now commercially available. This paper discusses the principles of the method and reviews the results of site experience. The technique was originally designed to work on pipes that were either un-coated or covered with, for example, epoxy paint. Recent tests have shown promising results with more attenuative coatings and these are discussed.

165 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the dispersion curves for toroidal structures have been calculated using a finite element method, as there is no available analytical solution, and the factors affecting the transmission and reflection behavior have been identified by studying a straight-curved-straight structure both numerically and experimentally.
Abstract: The practical testing of pipes in a pipe network has shown that there are issues concerning the propagation of ultrasonic guided waves through bends. It is therefore desirable to improve the understanding of the reflection and transmission characteristics of the bend. First, the dispersion curves for toroidal structures have been calculated using a finite element method, as there is no available analytical solution. Then the factors affecting the transmission and reflection behavior have been identified by studying a straight-curved-straight structure both numerically and experimentally. The frequency dependent transmission behavior obtained is explained in terms of the modes propagating in the straight and curved sections of the pipe.

74 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the capability of embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) to excite and detect tuned Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is explored.
Abstract: The capability of embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) to excite and detect tuned Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is explored. First, a brief review of Lamb waves theory is presented. Second, the PWAS operating principles and their structural coupling through a thin adhesive layer are analyzed. Then, a model of the Lamb waves tuning mechanism with PWAS transducers is described. The model uses the space domain Fourier transform. The analysis is performed in the wavenumber space. The inverse Fourier transform is used to return into the physical space. The integrals are evaluated with the residues theorem. A general solution is obtained for a generic expression of the interface shear stress distribution. The general solution is reduced to a closed-form expression for the case of ideal bonding which admits a closed-form Fourier transform of the interfacial shear stress. It is shown that the strain wave response varies like sin a, whereas the displacement response varies like sinc a. ...

890 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide a state-of-the-art review of guided wave based structural health monitoring (SHM) and highlight the future directions and open areas of research in guided wave-based SHM.
Abstract: The paper provides a state of the art review of guided wave based structural health monitoring (SHM). First, the fundamental concepts of guided wave propagation and its implementation for SHM is explained. Following sections present the different modeling schemes adopted, developments in the area of transducers for generation, and sensing of wave, signal processing and imaging technique, statistical and machine learning schemes for feature extraction. Next, a section is presented on the recent advancements in nonlinear guided wave for SHM. This is followed by section on Rayleigh and SH waves. Next is a section on real-life implementation of guided wave for industrial problems. The paper, though briefly talks about the early development for completeness,. is primarily focussed on the recent progress made in the last decade. The paper ends by discussing and highlighting the future directions and open areas of research in guided wave based SHM.

664 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a vision of ultrasonic guided wave inspection potential as we move forward into the new millennium and provide a brief description of the sensor and software technology that will make ultrasonic guidance wave inspection commonplace in the next century.
Abstract: Ultrasonic guided wave inspection is expanding rapidly to many different areas of manufacturing and in-service inspection. The purpose of this paper is to provide a vision of ultrasonic guided wave inspection potential aswe move forward into the new millennium. An increased understanding of the basic physics and wave mechanics associated with guided wave inspection has led to an increase in practical nondestructive evaluation and inspection problems. Some fundamental concepts and a number of different applications that are currently being considered will be presented in the paper along with a brief description of the sensor and software technology that will make ultrasonic guided wave inspection commonplace in the next century.

623 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A signal processing technique makes use of a priori knowledge of the dispersion characteristics of a guided wave mode to map signals from the time to distance domains to improve spatial resolution in guided wave inspection applications.
Abstract: Guided acoustic and ultrasonic waves have been utilized in various manners for non-destructive evaluation and testing. If a guided wave mode is dispersive, a pulse of energy will spread out in space and time as it propagates. For a long-range guided wave inspection application, this constrains the choice of operating point to regions on the dispersion curves where dispersion effects are small. A signal processing technique is presented that enables this constraint on operating point to be relaxed. The technique makes use of a priori knowledge of the dispersion characteristics of a guided wave mode to map signals from the time to distance domains. In the mapping process, dispersed signals are compressed to their original shape. The theoretical basis of the technique is described and an efficient numerical implementation is presented. The robustness of the technique to inaccuracies in the dispersion data is also addressed. The application of the technique to experimental data is shown and the resulting improvement in spatial resolution is demonstrated. The implications of using dispersion compensation in practical systems are briefly discussed.

349 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that the number of sensors required per unit area to reliably detect a prescribed type of damage is prohibitively high, even in the presence of modest temperature fluctuations, hence some form of temperature compensation is absolutely essential for guided-wave SHM systems to be viable.
Abstract: Structural health monitoring (SHM) using guided waves is one of the only ways in which damage anywhere in a structure can be detected using a sparse array of permanently attached sensors. To distinguish damage from structural features, some form of comparison with damage-free reference data is essential, and here subtraction is considered. The detectability of damage is determined by the amplitude of residual signals from structural features remaining after the subtraction of reference data. These are non-zero due to changing environmental conditions such as temperature. In this paper, the amplitude of the residual signals is quantified for different guided-wave SHM strategies. Comparisons are made between two methods of reference signal subtraction and between two candidate sensor configurations. These studies allow estimates to be made of the number of sensors required per unit area to reliably detect a prescribed type of damage. It is shown that the number required is prohibitively high, even in the presence of modest temperature fluctuations, hence some form of temperature compensation is absolutely essential for guided-wave SHM systems to be viable. A potential solution is examined and shown to provide an improvement in signal suppression of approximately 30 dB, which corresponds to two orders of magnitude reduction in the number of sensors required.

328 citations