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Banani Deka and Anania Arjuna

Bio: Banani Deka and Anania Arjuna is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Callus formation. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 2 citations.

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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, young tender leaves of T.erecta were collected from plants grown in pots under adequate sunlight and rainfall and inoculated in MS medium supplemented with Kn, IAA, NAA and 2-4-D in different combinations.
Abstract: Tagetes erecta is a plant of great medicinal value and is in high commercial demand due to its various uses in religious purposes, as eatables, and is used for the treatment of headache and strengthening of the heart, treating wounds and prevent them from getting infected with bacteria and toxins. Young tender leaves of T.erecta were collected from plants grown in pots under adequate sunlight and rainfall.. Leaves were sterilised with 70% ethanol for 5 minutes and 0.02% Mercuric chloride for 3 minutes and inoculated in MS medium supplemented with Kn, IAA, NAA and 2,4-D in different combinations (0, 0.5, 2.5, 5.0, 10 mg/L). 50% callus formation are observed in 0.5 mg/L Kn from LT, 0.5 mg/L Kn + 2.5 mg/L IAA from LM, 0.5 mg/L Kn + 10.0 mg/L IAA from LM, 2.5 mg/L Kn + 0.5 mg/L IAA from LT, 5.0 mg/L Kn + 2.5 mg/L 2,4-D from LT and 10.0 mg/L Kn + 0.5 mg/L IAA from LM. 100% callus formation occurred in the combinations of 0.5 mg/L Kn + 5.0 mg/L 2,4-D from LB and LM, 2.5 mg/L Kn from LT and 5.0 mg/L Kn + 0.5 mg/L IAA from LT. Root formation was observed in the concentration of 2.5 mg/L Kn + 0.5 mg/L IAA from LT. Root formation was observed in low concentration of Kn in combination with a low concentration of cytokinin. Callus induction resulted in high concentration of Kn and cytokinin.. It has also been observed that the explants responded differently towards different growth regulators in varying concentrations. The best callus growth was found using the Kn and IAA as growth regulators within a short time period.

2 citations


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BookDOI
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: Critical aspects of the basic procedures of micropropagation, regeneration, and somatic embryogenesis are covered in a well-balanced collection of easy-to-follow protocols presented in three separate, but complimentary, volumes.
Abstract: The origin of plant cell and tissue culture can be found in a treatise published during the mid-18th century, entitled La Physique des Arbes, that describes the formation of callus tissue following the for mation of a ring of cortex from elm trees. Over the next two centuries, the discovery of plant growth hormones, in particular auxins and cytokinins, and detailed analyses on the nutritional requirements of plants, led to the formulation of media that could maintain actively dividing cultures derived from gymnosperms, and both dicotyledon ous and monocotyledonous angiosperms. However, much of the prog ress and technological development in the in vitro propagation of plant cells, tissues, and organs has occurred during the last 25 years. Recently, plant tissue culture techniques have been used as basic tools in the rapidly expanding field of plant biotechnology for the development and clonal propagation of new and/or improved plant varieties. Plant tissue culture is used for the micropropagation of commercially valuable cultivars that include ornamentals, oil palm, Glycyrrhiza, Pyrethrum, pine, Eucalyptus, sugar cane, and potatoes. Cultured plant tissue is also used for the selection of cells and, ul timately, the regeneration of plants that are tolerant to physical stresses such as pathogens, drought, and temperature extremes, and to chemical stress agents such as salinity, herbicides, proteins, and pyrethrins. In addition, new plants have been produced by the fusion of protoplasts prepared from cultured cells of different species in cluding sunflower and french bean, tomato and potato, and various cultivars of Datura. Finally, bacterial vectors and various mechanical methods have been used to introduce foreign genes into cultured plant tissues. Genetic transformation can result in profound changes in the phenotype and/or biochemical profile of the regenerated trans genic plants that are not characteristic of the wild type. An impressive variety of technologies in tissue culture, genetic manipulation, and molecular biology have been developed for nu merous plant species. Many of these techniques, sometimes referred to as plant biotechnology, have been extensively summarized and compiled in a well-balanced collection of easy-to-follow protocols presented in three separate, but complimentary, volumes. Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture consists of 22 chapters (with 86 figures) and 5 appendices. The chapters cover critical aspects of (a) the es sential requirements for the operation of a plant tissue culture lab oratory; (b) the basic procedures of micropropagation, regeneration, and somatic embryogenesis; (c) some specific applications of organ culture systems such as embryo rescue and culture, and anther and microspore culture for haploid and double haploid production; (d) elementary transformation technology; and (e) useful microtechnique and analytical protocols specifically adapted to cultured tissues and cells. The appendices provide a convenient summary of media for mulations and commercial suppliers for the materials described in the text.

662 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The highest rate of callus induction for Tagetes leaf was achieved on media supplemented with 2, 4 D (2 mg/L ) and BAP (5mg/L) with compact, fast growing, pale yellow coloured callus.
Abstract: Tagetes erecta is an industrially and commercially important ornamental plant belonging to family Asteraceae. Developing tissue culture technique for Tagetes erecta will permit the application of biotechnology to its culture and potential for exploitatation of phytochemicals. The present work is based on developing protocols for the callus induction in Tagetes erecta from leaf explants. The sterilized explants were inoculated in Murashige and Skoog (MS) media containing various combinations of auxins such as Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), Indole 3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,4 Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4 D) and cytokinins such as Kinetin (KIN) and Benzylaminopurines (BAP). The highest rate of callus induction for Tagetes leaf was achieved on media supplemented with 2, 4 D (2 mg/L ) and BAP (5mg/L) with compact, fast growing, pale yellow coloured callus. Leaf explans were grown with IAA, IBA, NAA and KIN at different concentrations to evaluate tissue responses such as production of proembryo and roots in the explant.

4 citations