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Barry Wood

Bio: Barry Wood is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Official history & Battle. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 5 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines some manuscripts of the so-called "Anonymous Histories of Shah Esmāʿil" with a view to answering the question: How did people in post-1514 Iran remember the Battle of Chālderān?
Abstract: This article examines some manuscripts of the so-called “Anonymous Histories of Shah Esmāʿil” with a view to answering the question: How did people in post-1514 Iran remember the Battle of Chālderān? After a brief examination of these manuscripts, the article focuses on three moments of the battle—the Safavid council of war, Esmāʿil’s clash with Malquch-oghli, and the Ottoman cannonade—to explore the ways in which popular memory embellished and altered the events we know from the official histories. Such changes reveal that the loss at Chālderān may have marked the end of Shah Esmāʿil’s aura of invincibility, but not of his larger-than-life image in the minds of his countrymen.

5 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Yamamoto and Yamamoto discuss how oral tradition inter-connects with Middle Eastern literature and present a Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures (BSIL).
Abstract: KUMIKO YAMAMOTO Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures, 26. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003. xxiv + 191 pp. ISBN 90 04 12587 6 The central argument of this book concerns how oral tradition intera...

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the poetry of Shah Ismāʿīl Safavī (d. 1524), the founder of the Safavid dynasty of Iran, and discuss the idea of viewing this body of works as literary sources versus political propaganda.
Abstract: This article explores the poetry of Shah Ismāʿīl Safavī (d. 1524), the founder of the Safavid dynasty of Iran. Established as an important historical source by Vladimir Minorsky during World War II, the issues surrounding the poetic corpus of Shah Ismāʿīl have continued to attract the attention of historians of the Safavids. With examples from the earliest and most authentic manuscript, the idea of viewing this body of works as literary sources versus political propaganda is discussed in this article.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Sholeh Quinn demonstrates that the court historians of the Safavid period adhered to specific conventions and metholodogies in their texts, and that the chronicles were highly imitative in portions.
Abstract: How was history was written during the reign of Shah Abbas I (r. 1587 1629)? The question is critical for advancing current understanding of an important period in Iranian and Islamic history, since court chronicles are the chief sources for interpretation of all social, cultural, and political elements of the Safavid Period. Sholeh Quinn demonstrates that far from composing arbitrary and haphazard compositions, the court historians adhered to specific conventions and metholodogies in their texts. In the course of unveiling Safavid historiographic conventions, Quinn also shows that the chronicles were highly imitative in portions. When narrating the past, for instance, Safavid historians usually chose one model that they repeated, often word-for-word, while introducing specific changes to make the earlier text reflect changing notions of political legitimacy and to establish Safavid connections to earlier dynasties. Because these techniques were not unique to the Safavids, this study has implications for many other periods of Iranian history and provides a new approach to Persian chronicles.\

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 May 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the Author has identified the Tārī-e jahānārā of the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin (Ms. Per. 278) as yet another version of the so-called anonymous histories of Shāh Esmā'il, probably compiled in 1683 (p. 91), which would make it the earliest instance of this genre.
Abstract: This article represents an important contribution to our knowledge of Safavid historical literature, since the Author has identified the Tārīḫ-e jahānārā of the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin (Ms. Per. 278) as yet another version of the so-called “anonymous histories of Shāh Esmā‘il”, probably compiled in 1683 (p. 91), which would make it the earliest instance of this genre. What makes this particular work even more important is the presence of eighteen illustrations, where the Author detec...

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines how Zeyā al-Din Barani may have imagined that contemporary audiences would consume his Trikh-e Firuz Shāhi, and whether it was only read visually or also read aloud (directed at the...
Abstract: This article examines how Zeyā al-Din Barani may have imagined that contemporary audiences would consume his Tārikh-e Firuz Shāhi. Would it only be read visually or also read aloud (directed at the...