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Bernd-A. Rusinek

Bio: Bernd-A. Rusinek is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 4 publications receiving 44 citations.

Papers
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DOI
13 May 2019
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the professional life of Rudolf Greifeld, who was a managing director from 1956 to 1974 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center.
Abstract: Die Arbeit untersucht den Lebensweg des von 1956 bis 1974 im Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe als Geschaftsfuhrer wirkenden Rudolf Greifeld. Es fragt nach seiner Rolle im Nationalsozialismus und behandelt die seit den 1970er Jahren gegen ihn erhobenen Vorwurfe. Dabei werden auch Greifelds Kollegen in der Geschaftsfuhrung des Zentrums betrachtet, deren Karrieren im Nationalsozialismus bereits deutlich weiter fortgeschritten waren und teilweise zu deutlich starkeren Verstrickungen gefuhrt hatten. This book examines the professional life of Rudolf Greifeld, who was a managing director from 1956 to 1974 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. Main topics are his role in National Socialism and the allegations against him risen in the 1970s. The survey also includes Greifeld's colleagues in the management of the center, whose careers in National Socialism had progressed much further and in some cases had led to much stronger entanglements. Umfang: 361 S. Preis: €56.00 | £51.00 | $98.00

10 citations


Cited by
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Book
14 Mar 2019
TL;DR: Rosenfeld as mentioned in this paper explores the universalization of the Fourth Reich by left-wing radicals in the 1960s, its transformation into a source of pop culture entertainment in the 1970s, and its embrace by authoritarian populists and neo-Nazis seeking to attack the European Union since the year 2000.
Abstract: Ever since the collapse of the Third Reich, anxieties have persisted about Nazism's revival in the form of a Fourth Reich. Gavriel D. Rosenfeld reveals, for the first time, these postwar nightmares of a future that never happened and explains what they tell us about Western political, intellectual, and cultural life. He shows how postwar German history might have been very different without the fear of the Fourth Reich as a mobilizing idea to combat the right-wing forces that genuinely threatened the country's democratic order. He then explores the universalization of the Fourth Reich by left-wing radicals in the 1960s, its transformation into a source of pop culture entertainment in the 1970s, and its embrace by authoritarian populists and neo-Nazis seeking to attack the European Union since the year 2000. This is a timely analysis of a concept that is increasingly relevant in an era of surging right-wing politics.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
26 Mar 2019
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose a method to solve the problem of scalar clustering, i.e., clustering-based clustering and clustering.701.701
Abstract: 701

43 citations

Book
14 May 2015
TL;DR: Follmer as mentioned in this paper traces the history of individuality in Berlin from the late 1920s to the construction of the Berlin Wall in August 1961, and proposes a fresh perspective on twentieth-century Berlin that will engage readers with an interest in the German metropolis as well as European urban history more broadly.
Abstract: Moritz Follmer traces the history of individuality in Berlin from the late 1920s to the construction of the Berlin Wall in August 1961. The demand to be recognised as an individual was central to metropolitan society, as were the spectres of risk, isolation and loss of agency. This was true under all five regimes of the period, through economic depression, war, occupation and reconstruction. The quest for individuality could put democracy under pressure, as in the Weimar years, and could be satisfied by a dictatorship, as was the case in the Third Reich. It was only in the course of the 1950s, when liberal democracy was able to offer superior opportunities for consumerism, that individuality finally claimed the mantle. Individuality and Modernity in Berlin proposes a fresh perspective on twentieth-century Berlin that will engage readers with an interest in the German metropolis as well as European urban history more broadly.

33 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 May 2006
TL;DR: Brandt kneeled in front of the Warsaw Memorial and remained still for a minute as discussed by the authors to sign the Warsaw Treaty, one of the treaties between Germany and Warsaw Pact nations currently seen as the first diplomatic step to the breakthrough of the Iron Curtain.
Abstract: On December 7, 1970, Willy Brandt, the Chancellor of the German Federal Republic, was to sign the Warsaw Treaty, one of the treaties between Germany and Warsaw Pact nations currently seen as the first diplomatic step to the breakthrough of the Iron Curtain. The official signing took place in Warsaw and, as expected in the international political arena, it was paralleled by several commemorative ceremonies. The agenda included a visit to the Warsaw Memorial, erected in honor of the Jewish heroes of the 1943 Ghetto Uprising. Surrounded by the official political entourage and several representatives of the international press, Mr. Brandt stepped out of his vehicle, slowly approached the Memorial, straightened out the ribbon of a previously laid flower wreath and took a step back. Then something unexpected happened: he suddenly sank on to his knees in front of the Memorial and remained still for a minute. The next day, the response to his gesture was enormous. The picture of Brandt kneeling made its mark in the international press. All major newspapers in Europe and the United States enthusiastically featured this “emotional moment” in international relations. Based on a media analysis of the German Chancellor Willy Brandt’s kneefall in Warsaw, I will demonstrate that this was not just another media-hyped occurrence in politics but in fact an extraordinary event that marked the beginning of a new stage of development in the trajectory of German identity and memory. This performative event has changed the way in which Germans attempt to come

33 citations