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Beverly Daniels Tatum

Bio: Beverly Daniels Tatum is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Affirmative action & Identity (social science). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 1555 citations.

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24 Jun 1999
TL;DR: A definition of terms Defining Racism can be found in this paper, where the Complexity of Identity and Affirmative Action are defined. But there is more than just Black and White, you know.
Abstract: Introduction A Definition of Terms Defining RacismCan we talk? The Complexity of IdentityWho am I? Understanding Blackness In A White Context The Early YearsIs my skin brown because I drink chocolate milk? Identity Development in AdolescenceWhy are all the black kids sitting together in the cafeteria? Racial Identity in AdulthoodStill a work in progress Understanding Whiteness In a White Context The Development of White IdentityIm not ethnic, Im just normal. White Identity and Affirmative ActionIm in favor of affirmative action except when it comes to my jobs. Beyond Black and White Critical Issues in Latino, American Indian, and Asian Pacific American Identity DevelopmentTheres more than just Black and White, you know. Identity Development in Multiracial FamiliesBut dont the children suffer? Breaking The Silence Embracing a Cross-Racial DialogueWe were struggling for the words.

1,562 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors conceptualized community cultural wealth as a critical race theory (CRT) challenge to traditional interpretations of cultural capital, shifting the research lens away from a deficit view of Communities of Color as places full of cultural poverty disadvantages, and instead focusing on and learns from the array of cultural knowledge, skills, abilities and contacts possessed by socially marginalized groups that often go unrecognized and unacknowledged.
Abstract: This article conceptualizes community cultural wealth as a critical race theory (CRT) challenge to traditional interpretations of cultural capital. CRT shifts the research lens away from a deficit view of Communities of Color as places full of cultural poverty disadvantages, and instead focuses on and learns from the array of cultural knowledge, skills, abilities and contacts possessed by socially marginalized groups that often go unrecognized and unacknowledged. Various forms of capital nurtured through cultural wealth include aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial and resistant capital. These forms of capital draw on the knowledges Students of Color bring with them from their homes and communities into the classroom. This CRT approach to education involves a commitment to develop schools that acknowledge the multiple strengths of Communities of Color in order to serve a larger purpose of struggle toward social and racial justice.

4,897 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, critical race theory can inform a critical race methodology in education and the authors challenge the intercentricity of racism with other forms of subordination and expose deficit-informed research that silences and distorts epistemologies of people of color.
Abstract: This article addresses how critical race theory can inform a critical race methodology in education. The authors challenge the intercentricity of racism with other forms of subordination and exposes deficit-informed research that silences and distorts epistemologies of people of color. Although social scientists tell stories under the guise of “objective” research, these stories actually uphold deficit, racialized notions about people of color. For the authors, a critical race methodology provides a tool to “counter” deficit storytelling. Specifically, a critical race methodology offers space to conduct and present research grounded in the experiences and knowledge of people of color. As they describe how they compose counter-stories, the authors discuss how the stories can be used as theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical tools to challenge racism, sexism, and classism and work toward social justice.

3,102 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors compare and contrast the experiences of Chicana/Chicano students through a Eurocentric and a critical raced-gendered epistemological perspective and demonstrate that each perspective holds vastly different views of what counts as knowledge, specifically regarding language, culture, and commitment to communities.
Abstract: For too long, the histories, experiences, cultures, and languages of students of color have been devalued, misinterpreted, or omitted within formal educational settings. In this article, the author uses critical race theory (CRT) and Latina/Latino critical theory (LatCrit) to demonstrate how critical raced-gendered epistemologies recognize students of color as holders and creators of knowledge. In doing so, she discusses how CRT and LatCrit provide an appropriate lens for qualitative research in the field of education. She then compares and contrasts the experiences of Chicana/Chicano students through a Eurocentric and a critical raced-gendered epistemological perspective and demonstrates that each perspective holds vastly different views of what counts as knowledge, specifically regarding language, culture, and commitment to communities. She then offers implications of critical raced-gendered epistemologies for both research and practice and concludes by discussing some of the critiques of the use of the...

1,285 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Annette Lareau1
TL;DR: This paper found that middle-class children gain an emerging sense of entitlement from their family life, while working-class and poor children did not display the same feelings of entitlement or advantages.
Abstract: Although family life has an important impact on children’s life chances, the mechanisms through which parents transmit advantages are imperfectly understood. An ethnographic data set of white children and black children approximately 10 years old shows the effects of social class on interactions inside the home. Middle-class parents engage in concerted cultivation by attempting to foster children’s talents through organized leisure activities and extensive reasoning. Working-class and poor parents engage in the accomplishment of natural growth, providing the conditions under which children can grow but leaving leisure activities to children themselves. These parents also use directives rather than reasoning. Middle-class children, both white and black, gain an emerging sense of entitlement from their family life. Race had much less impact than social class. Also, differences in a cultural logic of childrearing gave parents and their children differential resources to draw on in their interactions with professionals and other adults outside the home. Middle-class children gained individually insignificant but cumulatively important advantages. Working-class and poor children did not display the same sense of entitlement or advantages. Some areas of family life appeared exempt from the effects of social class, however.

1,106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Bree Picower1
TL;DR: This paper found that through previous life experiences, the participants gained hegemonic understandings about race and difference, and responded to challenges to these understandings by relying on a set of "tools of whiteness" designed to protect and maintain dominant and stereotypical understandings of race.
Abstract: While much research that explores the role of race in education focuses on children of color, this article explores an aspect of the predominately White teaching force that educates them. This article explores findings from a qualitative study that posed questions about the ways in which White pre‐service teachers’ life‐experiences influenced understandings of race and difference, and how these pre‐service teachers negotiated the challenges a critical multicultural education course offered those beliefs. In keeping with the tenet of critical race theory that racism is an inherent and normalized aspect of American society, the author found that through previous life‐experiences, the participants gained hegemonic understandings about race and difference. Participants responded to challenges to these understandings by relying on a set of ‘tools of Whiteness’ designed to protect and maintain dominant and stereotypical understandings of race – tools that were emotional, ideological, and performative. This phen...

646 citations