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Bill Forsythe

Bio: Bill Forsythe is an academic researcher from University of Exeter. The author has contributed to research in topics: Insanity & Lunatic. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 19 publications receiving 159 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The English Experience of the county Lunatic Asylum as discussed by the authorsocusing on the English experience of the 1808-1845 county asylums, the case of Buckinghamshire, 1853-1872 David Wright Part II Therapeutic regimes in the nineteenth century 6. Framing psychiatric subjectivity: doctor, patient and record-keeping at Bethlem in the 19th century Akihito Suzuki 7.'Destined to a perfect recovery': the confinement of puerperal insanity in the twenty-first century Hilary Marland Part III On the edge: the English model and
Abstract: 1. Accommodating madness: new research in the social history of insanity and institutions Joseph Melling Part I The English Experience of the county lunatic asylum 2. The county asylum in the mixed economy of care, 1808-1845 Leonard D. Smith 3. The asylum and the Poor Law: the productive alliance Peter Bartlett 4. Politics of lunacy: central state regulation and the Devon Pauper Lunatic Asylum, 1845-1914 Bill Forsythe, Joseph Melling and Richard Adair 5. The discharge of pauper lunatics from county asylums in mid-Victorian England: the case of Buckinghamshire, 1853-1872 David Wright Part II Therapeutic regimes in the nineteenth century 6. Framing psychiatric subjectivity: doctor, patient and record-keeping at Bethlem in the nineteenth century Akihito Suzuki 7.'Destined to a perfect recovery': the confinement of puerperal insanity in the nineteenth century Hilary Marland Part III On the edge: the English model and national peripheries 8. Establishing the 'rule of kindness': the foundation of the North Wales Lunatic Asylum, Denbigh Pamela Michael and David Hirst 9.'The property of the whole community'. Charity and insanity in urban Scotland: the Dundee Royal Lunatic Asylum, 1805-1850 Lorraine Walsh 10. Raising the tone of asylumdom: maintaining and expelling pauper lunatics at the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum in the nineteenth century Jonathan Andrews 11. 'The designs of providence': race, religion and Irish insanity Oonagh Walsh Part IV The colonial vision 12. Out of sight and out of mind: insanity in early nineteenth-century British India Waltraud Ernst 13. 'Every facility that modern science and enlightened humanity have devised: race and progress in a colonial hospital, Valkenberg Mental Asylum, Cape Colony, 1894-1910 Shula Marks Part V Reflections 14. Rethinking the history of asylumdom Andrew Scull

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: L'A.
Abstract: L'A. apporte sa contribution dans l'histoire sociale de la folie en soulignant le role important des lois dans l'administration de la legislation de la folie Victorienne au XIX e siecle en Angleterre

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The lunatic asylum remains one of the most remarkable institutional monuments of the modern world, dominating the social landscape of Victorian Britain and exercising a powerful attraction for social historians of medicine, an attraction almost as great as the spectre of the madhouse for contemporary novelists.
Abstract: The lunatic asylum remains one of the most remarkable institutional monuments of the modern world, dominating the social landscape of Victorian Britain and exercising a powerful attraction for social historians of medicine, an attraction almost as great as the spectre of the madhouse for contemporary novelists. Our image of the Victorian asylum is still pervaded to a surprising degree by the gloomy spectacle of the total institution presented by Michel Foucault, though it has been modified by a whole range of institutional and philosophical accounts undertaken in the past three decades. Pioneering studies by researchers such as Andrew Scull have illuminated not only the power exercised by the new asylum superintendents, armed with medical discourses of moral treatment and the early promise of curability, but also the continuing dominance of the ‘mad doctors’ in the sombre years of neo-Darwinian pessimism and eugenics doctrines. More recent contributions to the now enormous literature on the social history of insanity have shifted the focus of attention from earlier concerns with charting the rise of the asylum and the elaboration of medical discourses under the psychiatric gaze of physicians to a detailed reconstruction of the social environment of the asylum and especially to the interplay between familial circumstances and the way institutions responded to the insane. Such concerns were also clearly evident in important earlier studies by Walton, Scull, Digby and others, which drew on fundamental work by Anderson on the changing role of the family during industrialization. These scholars drew attention to the importance of family and kinship relations in the negotiation of a lunatic's passage to the Victorian asylum, as well as the role of wider forces of economic change, population growth and migration in shaping the environment in which decisions about the care of the mad were made.

16 citations

BookDOI
11 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The authors provide a fascinating summary of the debates on the growth of institutional care during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and look at the significance of ethnicity, race and gender as well as the impact of political and cultural factors, throughout Britain and in a colonial context.
Abstract: This comprehensive collection provides a fascinating summary of the debates on the growth of institutional care during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Revising and revisiting Foucault, it looks at the significance of ethnicity, race and gender as well as the impact of political and cultural factors, throughout Britain and in a colonial context. It questions historically what it means to be mad and how, if at all, to care.

14 citations


Cited by
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MonographDOI
05 Dec 2019
TL;DR: The authors examines the nineteenth century through episodes, institutions, sites and representations concerned with union, concord and bonds of sympathy, but also through moments of secession, separation, discord and disjunction.
Abstract: This volume examines the nineteenth century not only through episodes, institutions, sites and representations concerned with union, concord and bonds of sympathy, but also through moments of secession, separation, discord and disjunction. Its lens extends from the local and regional, through to national and international settings in Britain, Europe and the United States. The contributors come from the fields of cultural history, literary studies, American studies and legal history.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although postmodern theory has virtually exploded throughout the social sciences, thus far it has only begun to touch criminology as discussed by the authors, and the potential relevance of postmodernism for criminological research is discussed.
Abstract: Although postmodern theory has virtually exploded throughout the social sciences, thus far it has only begun to touch criminology This piece identifies some of the principal themes associated with postmodern thought, reasons for the current interest in it, and its potential relevance for criminology There are many postmodernisms, but special attention is paid here to the popular models borrowed from literary and linguistic analysis Violence is used as a concrete example to explore these issues The postmodern critique is a challenge not only to the philosophical underpinnings of traditional and empirical criminology, but also to the basic premises of both mainstream and progressive social policy responses to criminal violence

49 citations