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Author

Bob Moore

Bio: Bob Moore is an academic researcher from University of Sheffield. The author has contributed to research in topics: World War II & Refugee. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 45 publications receiving 428 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the survival of foreign Jews in the Netherlands during the last year of occupation and the realities of liberation, including self-help, rescuers, pursuers and accomplices.
Abstract: Jews in the Netherlands before 1940 invasion and occupation - the first months isolation deportation and extermination survival - exemptions and exclusions survival in hiding self-help, rescuers and bystanders persecutors, pursuers and accomplices the survival of foreign Jews the last year of occupation and realities of liberation.

53 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: Crises of Empire as discussed by the authors is a history of the collapse of the British, French, and Dutch colonial empires, focusing on the role of Africans and Asians as agents of colonial change, highlighting the parts played by anti-colonial movements, popular protest, and armed insurgency.
Abstract: The book is relevant, timely and innovative. It addresses an important historic topic and synthesises the existing literature. The authors give empirical body to some of the questions that have been raised in recent years by the theorists of post colonial history and of global history while at the same time staying on firm ground by not neglecting the 'old fashioned' fields of diplomatic and economic history. Crises of Empire is essential reading for students of imperialism and comparative decolonization. It also offers new perspectives for those interested in contemporary European history, international politics, and the legacies of colonialism across the developing world. Written by subject specialists, it analyses the forces that precipitated the twentieth century collapse of all Europes late colonial empires. The fate of the British, French, and Dutch colonial empires is investigated individually and comparatively. So, too, is the bloody end to Belgian and Portuguese colonialism in black Africa.Ranging from the wave of European imperial expansion in the aftermath of World War I to the collapse of the last settler colonies in Africa during the 1960s and 1970s, the authors assess decolonization as a long-term process whose roots and outcomes transcended the Cold War. They draw attention to significant changes to the international system during the twentieth century as well as to shifting popular attitudes towards colonialism both within Europes imperial nation states and within individual colonies. They also discuss the economics of empire, focusing on such factors as changing global markets, colonial urbanization, and the growth of colonial organized labour. Above all, they consider the role of Africans and Asians as agents of colonial change, highlighting the parts played by anti-colonial movements, popular protest, and armed insurgency as catalysts of Europes imperial collapse.

38 citations

Book
01 Nov 1996
TL;DR: This article examined individual prisoners' experiences, but also provided an overview and synthesis of some of the most heated debates in the field, casting new light on the racial and ideological assumptions of captors and showing how axis powers and the Japanese dealt with Black African and African American troops who were taken prisoner.
Abstract: During World War II, captured service personnel of all the belligerent powers found themselves incarcerated as prisoners of war. Although the number of POWs ran into the millions, comparatively little has been written about them. This timely collection examines individual prisoners' experiences, but also provides an overview and synthesis of some of the most heated debates in the field. Casting new light on the racial and ideological assumptions of captors, authors show how axis powers and the Japanese dealt with Black African and African American troops who were taken prisoner. Political considerations are shown to have proven weightier than, in many cases, heinous crimes against humanity. Also highlighted is the history of Italian POWs in allied hands, the treatment of axis prisoners in Britain and the complex story of Free and Vichy French servicemen fighting each other in Africa. This important book will be essential and compulsive reading for students and scholars of the Second World War and will signpost areas worthy of further inquiry for many years to come.

28 citations

Book
01 Jul 2007
TL;DR: This book discusses the construction and staffing of the trains, the gas chambers, the escape attempts, the survivors, and the transport lists.
Abstract: * Acknowledgements * Foreword * Introduction * Prelude to the Final Solution * Construction and staffing * The trains * Arrival and selection * The Arbeitshaeftlinge * The gas chambers * Dorohucza/Lublin * Escape attempts * The revolt * After the revolt * Transports by country * The survivors * SS profiles * Explanation of abbreviations * Literature * The transport lists * Persons register * Place register Index

22 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors make the long-term goal of comprehensive civil registration in developing countries the expectation rather than the exception, and the international health community can assist by sharing information and methods to ensure both the quality of vital statistics and cause of death data.

432 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of the state of the arts in London and the date 2007 unless otherwise stated, with a focus on the arts and technology in education.
Abstract: (The place of publication is London and the date 2007 unless otherwise stated.)

174 citations

Book
16 Jun 2016
TL;DR: Gusejnova's book as mentioned in this paper sheds light on a group of German-speaking intellectuals of aristocratic origin who became pioneers of Europe's future regeneration, even though Germany lost its credit as a world power twice in that century, in the global cultural memory, the old Germanic families remained associated with the idea of Europe.
Abstract: Who thought of Europe as a community before its economic integration in 1957? Dina Gusejnova illustrates how a supranational European mentality was forged from depleted imperial identities. In the revolutions of 1917 to 1920, the power of the Hohenzollern, Habsburg and Romanoff dynasties over their subjects expired. Even though Germany lost its credit as a world power twice in that century, in the global cultural memory, the old Germanic families remained associated with the idea of Europe in areas reaching from Mexico to the Baltic region and India. Gusejnova's book sheds light on a group of German-speaking intellectuals of aristocratic origin who became pioneers of Europe's future regeneration. In the minds of transnational elites, the continent's future horizons retained the contours of phantom empires.

152 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present research highlights affiliation defenses in the psychological confrontation with death, and finds that mortality salience led to increased affiliation strivings, as indicated by a greater preference for sitting within a group as opposed to sitting alone.
Abstract: The present research highlights affiliation defenses in the psychological confrontation with death. In 3 experiments, it was found that mortality salience led to increased affiliation strivings, as indicated by a greater preference for sitting within a group as opposed to sitting alone. Mortality salience actually led to increased affiliation with a worldview-threatening group (Experiments 1-2), even when affiliation with the group forced participants to attack their own worldviews (Experiment 3). Taken together, the findings support a distinct role of affiliation defenses against existential concerns. Moreover, affiliation defenses seem powerful enough to override worldview validation defenses, even when the worldviews in question are personally relevant and highly accessible.

143 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose a theoretical framework for realpolitik and loss in the context of human vulnerability and the need for unity and altruistic punishment, and discuss the possibility of revolt and punishment.
Abstract: Preface Part I. Introduction: 1. Preliminary considerations 2. Case selection Part II. Explaining Perpetrators: Theoretical Foundations: 3. Continuity and validation 4. Prologue to theory 5. A theoretical framework Part III. The Theory Applied: 6. Threat of numbers, realpolitik, and ethnic cleansing 7. Realpolitik and loss 8. The need for unity and altruistic punishment 9. Perpetrating states Part IV. Victim Vulnerability: Explaining Magnitude and Manner of Dying: 10. Raison d'etat, raison d'eglise 11. Cynical realpolitik and the unwanted 12. High victimization: the role of realpolitik 13. Inequality and absence of identification 14. On the possibility of revolt and altruistic punishment Part V. Exceptions: 15. A dog of different nature: the Cambodian Politicide 16. Dogs that didn't bark I: realpolitik and the absence of loss 17. Dogs that didn't bark II: affinity and vulnerability reduction Part VI. Conclusion: 18. Findings, consequences, and prevention.

138 citations