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Bob Reid

Bio: Bob Reid is an academic researcher from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The author has contributed to research in topics: Safe Affordable Fission Engine & Test plan. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 7 publications receiving 49 citations.

Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
21 Feb 2001
TL;DR: The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on the Module Unfueled Thermal-hydraulic Test (MUTT) article has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses the results of these experiments to date, and describes the additional testing that will be performed. Recommendations related to the design of testable space fission power and propulsion systems are made.

13 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series, whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system, has demonstrated that realistic testing can be performed using non-nuclear methods.
Abstract: Successful development of space fission systems requires an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series, whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system, has demonstrated that realistic testing can be performed using non-nuclear methods. This test series, carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities, successfully completed a testing program with a 30 kWt core, Stirling engine, and ion engine configuration. Additionally, a 100 kWt core is in fabrication and appropriate test facilities are being reconfigured. This paper describes the current SAFE non-nuclear tests, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans.

10 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
04 Apr 2001
TL;DR: The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on the Safe Affordable Fission Engine—30 kilowatt (SAFE30) test article are being performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses the results of these experiments to date, and describes the additional testing that will be performed. Recommendations related to the design of testable space fission power and propulsion systems are made.

6 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Feb 2006
TL;DR: A status update on several of these research areas can be found in this paper, including System Integration, use of Regolith as Radiation Shielding, Waste Heat Rejection, Surface Environmental Effects on the Integrated System, Thermal Simulators, Surface System Integration / Interface / Interaction Testing, End-to-End Breadboard Development, Advanced Materials Development, Surface Energy Source Coolants, and Planetary Surface System Thermal Management and Control.
Abstract: Over the past five decades numerous studies have identified nuclear energy as an enhancing or enabling technology for planetary surface exploration missions. This includes both radioisotope and fission sources for providing both heat and electricity. Nuclear energy sources were used to provide electricity on Apollo missions 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17, and on the Mars Viking landers. Very small nuclear energy sources were used to provide heat on the Mars Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity rovers. Research has been performed at NASA MSFC to help assess potential issues associated with surface nuclear energy sources, and to generate data that could be useful to a future program. Research areas include System Integration, use of Regolith as Radiation Shielding, Waste Heat Rejection, Surface Environmental Effects on the Integrated System, Thermal Simulators, Surface System Integration / Interface / Interaction Testing, End‐to‐End Breadboard Development, Advanced Materials Development, Surface Energy Source Coolants, and Planetary Surface System Thermal Management and Control. This paper provides a status update on several of these research areas.

6 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 2021
TL;DR: In this article, a review of the structure of mean flow profiles over rough surfaces, and its correlation with smooth wall mean flow profile is presented, which can contribute to prospective experimental and CFD work, and for characterising rough-wall turbulent flows and heat transfer in different academic and engineering applications.
Abstract: Surface roughness can significantly influence the fluid dynamics and heat transfer in convective flows by inducing perturbations in the velocity profile which affect surface drag, turbulent mixing and heat transfer. While surface roughness can often negatively affect the performance of systems, it can also lead to performance improvements, such as in convective flows where roughness elements have been shown to enhance heat transfer. Turbulent flows over rough surfaces have been studied for about a century leading to significant developments in this field. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) has made significant contributions to the knowledge of turbulent flows over rough surfaces as well as evaluation of the developed theories. Moreover, the turbulent closures model has seen wide use for simulation of rough-wall turbulent flows in practical applications where DNS is hindered by its complexity and computational resources. Despite a significant number of experimental and CFD studies and the latest advances in this field, a recent review was not available. Therefore, this review surveys the past and recent experimental and numerical studies to address the fundamentals and theories related to the structure of turbulent flows over rough walls. This study chiefly investigates the structure of mean flow profile over rough surfaces, and its correlation with smooth wall mean flow profile. This review study can contribute to prospective experimental and CFD work, and for characterising rough-wall turbulent flows and heat transfer in different academic and engineering applications such as aerodynamics, hydraulics, meteorology, and manufacturing. The review concludes that despite significant progress, the structure of turbulent flow is still not fully understood. This is mainly due to a lack of systematic studies on the structure of turbulent flow and also due to the variety of roughness which influence the dynamics of the flow in the roughness sublayers. The current roughness scale (sand-grain roughness height) fails to completely characterise roughness in many cases. Therefore, there is a need for a universal roughness scale that can describe every type of roughness and be used in any rough-flow regimes, including fully rough and transitionally rough regimes.

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a 5kW Stirling convertor was developed for the Moon Reactor Power Demonstration Engine (SP-100) under the NASA Vision for Exploration of the moon.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a 50kWe potassium heat pipe cooled nuclear power source system is proposed, where Tungsten and water are used as shields and the reactivity is controlled by control drums.
Abstract: Micro heat pipe cooled reactor power source (HRP) could be applied for space or underwater vehicles and it meets the future demands of them, safer structure, longer operating time, fewer mechanical moving parts than conventional power devices. In this paper, a 50kWe potassium heat pipe cooled reactor power source system is proposed. The reactor core is featured with Uranium nitride fuel and potassium heat pipes. Tungsten and water are used as shields and the reactivity is controlled by control drums. The thermoelectric generator (TEG) consists of thermoelectric conversion units and water cooler. The thermoelectric conversion units convert thermal energy to electric energy through the highperformance thermoelectric material. A code applied for designing and analyzing the rector power system is developed. It consists of multi-channel rector core model, heat pipe model using thermal resistance network, thermoelectric conversion and thermal conductivity model. Then the sensitivity analysis is performed on two key parameters of the designed micro-nuclear power source and the steady-state calculations are also conducted. It is concluded that the preliminary design of HPR design is reasonable and reliable. The designed residual heat removal system has sufficient safety margin to release the decay heat of the reactor. This work provides reference to the design of heat pipe cooled micro nuclear power source.

21 citations

01 May 2010
TL;DR: In this article, an annular linear induction pump was tested over a range of conditions, including frequencies of 33, 36, 39, and 60 Hz, liquid metal temperatures from 25 to 525 C, and input voltages from 5 to 120 V. The maximum efficiency measured during testing was slightly greater than 6%.
Abstract: Results of performance testing of an annular linear induction pump are presented. The pump electromagnetically pumps liquid metal (NaK) through a circuit specially designed to allow for quantification of the performance. Testing was conducted over a range of conditions, including frequencies of 33, 36, 39, and 60 Hz, liquid metal temperatures from 25 to 525 C, and input voltages from 5 to 120 V. Pump performance spanned a range of flow rates from roughly 0.16 to 5.7 L/s (2.5 to 90 gpm), and pressure head <1 to 90 kPa (<0.145 to 13 psi). The maximum efficiency measured during testing was slightly greater than 6%. The efficiency was fairly insensitive to input frequency from 33 to 39 Hz, and was markedly lower at 60 Hz. In addition, the efficiency decreased as the NaK temperature was raised. While the pump was powered, the fluid responded immediately to changes in the input power level, but when power was removed altogether, there was a brief slow-down period before the fluid would come to rest. The performance of the pump operating on a variable frequency drive providing 60 Hz power compared favorably with the same pump operating on 60 Hz power drawn directly from the electrical grid.

16 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
15 Mar 2002
TL;DR: The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series addresses Phase 1 Space Fission Systems issues in particular non-nuclear testing and system integration issues leading to the testing and nonnuclear demonstration of a 400-kW fully integrated flight unit as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series addresses Phase 1 Space Fission Systems issues in particular non-nuclear testing and system integration issues leading to the testing and non-nuclear demonstration of a 400-kW fully integrated flight unit. The first part of the SAFE 30 test series demonstrated operation of the simulated nuclear core and heat pipe system. Experimental data acquired in a number of different test scenarios will validate existing computational models, demonstrated system flexibility (fast start-ups, multiple start-ups/shut downs), simulate predictable failure modes and operating environments. The objective of the second part is to demonstrate an integrated propulsion system consisting of a core, conversion system and a thruster where the system converts thermal heat into jet power. This end-to-end system demonstration sets a precedent for ground testing of nuclear electric propulsion systems. The paper describes the SAFE 30 end-to-end system demonstration and its subsystems.

16 citations