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Boba Samuels

Bio: Boba Samuels is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Academic writing & Educational psychology. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 12 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the extent to which graduate students are co-authors in these publications and what role this collaboration takes, and discussed the implications for collaboration with and between graduate students in the field of education.
Abstract: Professional collaboration in academia is valued because it is believed to encourage the generation and synthesis of ideas, to enhance workplace environments, and to comprise a key element in mentoring practices. Collaboration in writing is often of two types: formal co-authorship or informal commentary on colleagues’ work. Formal co-authorship is a topic that usually draws more attention for its problems and potential controversies than for its putative benefits. In our study, we examined professional academic co-authorship. Focusing on the field of education, we identified four research sub-fields (general education, educational psychology, language studies, and literacy studies) and analysed academic peer-reviewed journals from each of these sub-fields to establish how much collaboration exists in published articles. We then examined the extent to which graduate students are co-authors in these publications and what role this collaboration takes. Implications for collaboration with and between graduate students are discussed.

15 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Jordana et al. as discussed by the authors used a collaborative autoethnography approach to explore the experiences of Canadian academic writing instructors and found four major themes: (a) initial experience with writing centres, (b) community, (c) frustrations and tensions at work, and (d) mentorship.
Abstract: Garbati Jordana, Samuels Boba, Analyzing Stories from Canadian Academic Writing Instructors: A Collaborative Autoethnography [Analiza opowiadań kanadyjskich nauczycieli pisania akademickiego: zbiorowa autoetnografia]. Studia Edukacyjne nr 38, 2016, Poznań 2016, pp. 331-345. Adam Mickiewicz University Press. ISBN 978-83-232-3013-7. ISSN 1233-6688. DOI: 10.14746/ se.2016.38.20 Writing instruction in Canadian universities takes a variety of forms. While there are few formal departments for writing studies, many institutions do have a writing centre – a place that offers writing instruction to varying degrees. The writing centre may be housed within a department, a library, or within a student services unit. Its position within a university may indicate the degree to which writing is valued by the administrative body. The goal of our paper is to share insights into the ways that writing professionals perceive, work in, and adapt to current demands for writing instruction in higher education. Using a collaborative ethnographic approach, three scholars at different career stages explore their experiences with writing centre work. Using data consisting of individually written reflections, our analysis revealed four major themes: (a) initial experience with writing centres, (b) community, (c) frustrations and tensions at work, and (d) mentorship. In this paper, we discuss our findings within the framework of positioning theory in order to understand how we position ourselves as scholars, mentors, and educators, and how we are positioned by others within the fields of writing studies and higher education. This study raises awareness about the value of writing centre professionals’ contributions, the place of mentorship within higher education, and the support required for continued writing centre work.

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study focused on librarian authors of open access articles in the field of library and information science confirms that librarians engage in increasingly frequent interaction with researchers.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored the publishing productivity of PhD students in the United States in four social science disciplines: political science, psychology, social work/family science, and sociology.
Abstract: Demonstrating research activity and a productive publishing record is crucial for landing a tenure-track position after graduation. What does it mean, however, to be productive in publishing? How many manuscripts have PhD students who landed tenure-track positions published in recent years? The purpose of this study is to explore publishing productivity of PhD students in the United States in four social science disciplines: political science, psychology, social work/family science, and sociology. Data were collected from the curriculum vitae of 500 scholars currently employed at 108 research institutions in the United States and who finished their doctorate degrees within the last five years (2010–14). We found that PhD students in our sample averaged 4.3 peer-reviewed journal or book chapter publications before graduation. Analysis of the independent disciplines of interest is also presented.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Jul 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated strategies employed by universities in Kenya for managing scholarly content and found that most respondents documented research procedures, backed up information, and used printouts to preserve scholarly content; however, they hardly used digital archives and university servers.
Abstract: This study investigated strategies employed by universities in Kenya for managing scholarly content. The study was underpinned by the Conversation Theory and the Knowledge Management Process Model and was based on the post-positivist paradigm. A survey was conducted within a multiple case study design. The population of the study consisted of academic staff, postgraduate students, university librarians and representatives of university research units from six universities in Kenya. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data from academic staff and postgraduate students while key informants were interviewed. The results revealed that while the respondents generated theses, journal articles and conference papers, the majority did not participate in knowledge generation in the period from 2010 to 2014. The results further revealed that most respondents documented research procedures, backed up information, and used printouts to preserve scholarly content; however, they hardly used digital archives and university servers. The results suggested heavy reliance on modern technology-enabled communication techniques and faceto- face interactions for communication amongst scholars, whereas institutional repositories (IRs) were hardly used. The results revealed inadequate institutional support for research and scholarly communication including funding, material and physical infrastructure, mentorship, and information and communications technology (ICT) facilities. The study concluded that strategies for managing scholarly content at universities in Kenya are weak, impacting negatively on the quality, quantity and visibility of scholarly content; and that a policy framework encompassing the different facets of managing scholarly content is necessary. The study recommended developing specific strategies and policies to enhance scholarly content management; institutionalising mentorship programmes; increasing funding to strengthen universities' research capacity; and strengthening research niches.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a didactic instructional article presented an original educational approach, directed toward the improvement of existing university curriculum using effective and student-friendly teaching of fundamentals of modern scientific research for graduate and undergraduate students, emphasizing scientometrics and integrity.
Abstract: This didactic instructional article presents an original educational approach, directed toward the improvement of existing university curriculum using effective and student-friendly teaching of fundamentals of modern scientific research for graduate and undergraduate students, emphasizing scientometrics and integrity. This approach applies to students majoring in a wide range of basic and applied academic specializations in the various branches of science, engineering, computation and technology. The present methodological paper provides a novel, humanized and student-centered way of presenting a comprehensive and unified didactic explanation of originally narrated instructional material, which is based on the adaptation, generalization and creative re-thinking of the previous ten years of the author’s publishing experience. This experience has been in Scopus®- and SCIE WoS® Core Collection-indexed referred academic periodicals. The proposed learning material has found a full-scale educational approbation for a widely-targeted audience of full-time young bachelor-, M. Sc.- and Ph. D.-students as well as distant adult students, university faculties, scientific researchers, college instructors and engineering staff.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Major takeaways from this program include the value of student assessment in shaping publishing workshops; awareness of the discrepancies of registration numbers and actual attendance, highlighting the potential for enhanced promotion techniques; the importance of university press and faculty insight; and the benefits of collaboration among librarians, publishing professionals, and faculty members.
Abstract: BACKGROUND Students pursuing advanced degrees are increasingly expected to contribute to their discipline’s scholarly discourse during their tenure in graduate school. However, they are often unsure of how or where to begin the publishing process, and do not always feel comfortable asking for help from their faculty advisors or fellow students. Scholars, including librarians, have attempted to address these concerns by developing tools and services to meet the needs of future faculty. In recent years, university presses and research libraries have recognized their shared mission in furthering scholarship, with libraries themselves offering publishing education and expertise. PROJECT OVERVIEW During the 2012-2013 academic year, subject librarians and publishing professionals at the University of Michigan Library crafted a program to address students’ questions and concerns about the publishing lifecycle. This ongoing initiative includes a multi-semester workshop series developed in concert with faculty from departments throughout campus, as well as a supplementary online toolkit that takes into account the rapidly evolving nature of scholarly communication. LESSONS LEARNED Major takeaways from this program include: the value of student assessment in shaping publishing workshops; awareness of the discrepancies of registration numbers and actual attendance, highlighting the potential for enhanced promotion techniques; the importance of university press and faculty insight; and the benefits of collaboration among librarians, publishing professionals, and faculty members. NEXT STEPS Future iterations of this program will incorporate in-depth assessment of each program, a more interactive learning environment, and better scheduling and promotion of the workshop series.

12 citations