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Bratati De

Bio: Bratati De is an academic researcher from University of Calcutta. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ripening & Xanthone. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 8 publications receiving 51 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Gargi Nag1, Sukriti Das, Susmita Das, Suvra Mandal, Bratati De 
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyzed the antioxidant, anti-amylase, antiglucosidase and antiacetylcholinesterase (anti-AChE) properties of the leafy shoots of three Indian species of Swertia e.g.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this study, methanol extracts of fruit pulps obtained from seven Indian varieties of Mangifera indica were profiled using a metabolomics approach to understand the contribution of metabolites to varietal differences.
Abstract: Mango fruits from different varieties vary in aroma and taste. In this study, methanol extracts of fruit pulps obtained from seven Indian varieties of Mangifera indica (Amrapali, Fazli, Golapkhas, ...

12 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Achras sapota L. P. Royen (syn. Manilkara zapota) fruits are commonly known as sapodilla and they are allowed to ripen at room temperature when the pulp softens and become edible as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Achras sapota L. (syn. Manilkara zapota (L.) P. Royen) fruits are commonly known as sapodilla. The mature fruits when unripe are not edible. They are allowed to ripen at room temperature when the pulp softens and become edible. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the changes in metabolite composition during postharvest ripening over a span of 10 days following a GC-MS based metabolomics approach. The present metabolic data revealed, for the first time the composition of A. sapota fruit metabolites and changes in individual metabolite during postharvest ripening. Total 46 identified metabolites (11 sugars and sugar alcohols, 11 organic acids, 14 amino acids, 5 phenols, 4 fatty acids and 1 inorganic acid) and 20 tentatively identified compounds which showed significant differences during ripening could be detected. On the whole it appears that in spite of decrease in the level of many metabolites, a large number of amino acids and sugar alcohols increased in quantity ameliorating the fruit quality during ripening.

6 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Recent advances in untargeted/targeted fingerprinting approaches were described and their application in the taxonomic identification, classification and authentication of plants (medicinal) and essential oils discussed.

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Current treatment options, combining lifestyle changes and conventional treatment with commercial anti-obesity drugs have been described as well, and potential medicinal plant extracts and phytochemicals, able to modulate the molecular pathways and gene/protein expressions related to obesity, have been highlighted.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the essential oils were extracted from seven local varieties of P. betle L. leaves (Bangla, Bagerhati, Manikdanga, Meetha, Kalibangla, Chhaanchi and Ghanagete) with the aim to characterize the varieties on the basis of oil constituents and to study their enzyme inhibitory and cytotoxic properties.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Dec 2020
TL;DR: The Curcuma genus has been extensively used for therapeutic purposes in traditional or folk medicine worldwide, including for its anti-inflammatory activity as discussed by the authors, which can act on various targets in the signaling pathway, restrain pro-inflammatory enzymes, lower the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and reduce oxidative stress.
Abstract: The Curcuma genus has been extensively used for therapeutic purposes in traditional or folk medicine worldwide, including for its anti-inflammatory activity. Curcuma spp.'s active constituents, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, can act on various targets in the signaling pathway, restrain pro-inflammatory enzymes, lower the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and reduce oxidative stress, which subsequently suppresses inflammatory processes. Preclinical and clinical studies have reported the predominant anti-inflammatory activity of several Curcuma species. This review provides an overview of the anti-inflammatory effects of different extracts, preparations, and bioactive components in this genus. This analysis may provide a scientific basis for developing new and alternative methods for the isolation of a single entity from this genus to attenuate inflammatory conditions. The Curcuma genus is waiting for researchers interested in developing safe and efficient anti-inflammatory agents for further investigation.

26 citations

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TL;DR: Xanthones with anticholinesterase, monoamine oxidase and amyloid β aggregation inhibitory activities as well as antioxidant properties are reported, emphasizing xanthone derivatives with dual/multitarget activity as potential agents to treat AD.
Abstract: To date, the current therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is only symptomatic, being its efficacy limited. Hence, the recent research has been focused in the development of different pharmacological approaches. Here we discuss the potential of xanthone derivatives as new anti-Alzheimer agents. The interference of xanthone derivatives with acetylcholinesterase and other molecular targets and cellular mechanisms associated with AD have been recently systematically reported. Therefore, we report xanthones with anticholinesterase, monoamine oxidase and amyloid β aggregation inhibitory activities as well as antioxidant properties, emphasizing xanthone derivatives with dual/multitarget activity as potential agents to treat AD. We also propose the structural features for these activities that may guide the design of new, more effective xanthone derivatives.

25 citations