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Brian B. Kahn

Bio: Brian B. Kahn is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Judaism. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 7 citations.

Papers
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Journal Article
01 Oct 2005-Shofar
TL;DR: Impossible Images: Contemporary Art After the Holocaust as mentioned in this paperriedman et al. as mentioned in this paper, a collection of essays about contemporary art after the Holocaust, raised questions about our seemingly firm perceptions of the Holocaust.
Abstract: Impossible Images: Contemporary Art after the Holocaust, edited by Shelly Hornstein, Laura Levitt, and Laurence J. Silberstein. New York: New York University Press, 2003. 285 pp. $20.00. As a middle school teacher engaging my students in a unit on the Holocaust, I often struggled with the limitations of my own knowledge. Impossible Images: Contemporary Art After the Holocaust reminded me of how I, like many teachers, wrestled to comprehend the murderous history of this era and to find meaningful ways to engage my students in a critical exploration of both history and their own budding viewpoints. This essay collection, which grew out of an interdisciplinary conference of Jewish scholars and artists, raises questions about our seemingly firm perceptions of the Holocaust. What do works of Holocaust art make visible to us? How do they challenge our prior perceptions of the Holocaust? How do geography and cultural background affect our interpretations? Who in today's world has the right to create these images? The reader will encounter many more difficult and important questions, some of which are mentioned in the brief overview that follows. Impossible Images is organized into four conceptual clusters. In "Geography of the Heart," the essays confront the implications of Holocaust art in places far removed from the actual events of the past. How do we as Americans remember the Holocaust from these distances? In "Haunted By Memory: American Jewish Transformations," Michelle A. Friedman examines the work of American artists Shimon Attie and Steve Reich. Whether examining Attie's Between Dreams and History or studying Reich's musical composition, Different Trains, we are reminded that the history of the Holocaust does not really belong to this country and that the experiences of Jews in Europe and Jews in America are quite different. Julian Bonder, author and director of the controversial Center for Holocaust Studies at Clark University, contributes a fascinating essay addressing the relation between memory and commemoration. In "A House for a Uninhabitable Memory," he recalls the intentions of the designers as well as the many sensitive issues raised by the very nature of the project itself. How can this seemingly innocent site in Massachusetts become a "Holocaust site"? We learn that this structure was not designed to serve as a memorial or a museum but rather as a place where the present generation must ". . . negotiate the twilight zone between the Holocaust as a recollected background and the Holocaust as a historical event." The second section examines "Israel and the Politics of Memory." In "The Return of the Repressed," Ariella Azoulay examines the ways in which several Israeli artists have begun to incorporate images of Hitler in a culture where these representations have been traditionally repressed. And in "Don't Touch My Holocaust-Analyzing the Barometer of Responses: Israeli Artists Challenge the Holocaust Taboo," Tami Katz-Freiman helps us navigate the tricky waters surrounding the representation of the Holocaust in modern-day Israel. She first examines the 1980s movement to break the taboo of silencing the Holocaust with particular attention to the notions of "Holocaust and Heroism" and "Negation of Exile" as they relate to the ethos of the Zionist movement. …

7 citations


Cited by
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Dissertation
27 Jul 2010
Abstract: This paper focuses on issues of Jewish identity, whiteness and victimhood within hegemonic Holocaust education. I argue that today, Jewish people of European descent enjoy white privilege and are among the most socio-economically advantaged groups in the West. Despite this privilege, the organized Jewish community makes claims about Jewish victimhood that are widely accepted within that community and within popular discourse in the West. I propose that these claims to victimhood are no longer based in a reality of oppression, but continue to be propagated because a victimized Jewish identity can produce certain effects that are beneficial to the organized Jewish community and the Israeli nation-state. I focus on two related Holocaust education projects – the March of the Living and the March of Remembrance and Hope – to show how Jewish victimhood is instrumentalized in ways that obscure Jewish privilege, deny Jewish racism and promote the interests of the Israeli nation-state.

11 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The Tower of Faces as discussed by the authors is a collection of 6,000 photographs from Eishyshok, a small Jewish settlement in Eastern Europe, taken between 1890 and 1941, with the purpose of displaying them at the United States Holocaust Museum.
Abstract: THE UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUS TOWER OF FACES Grace Champlain Astrove, Master of Arts A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University. Virginia Commonwealth University, 2013 Major Director: Dr. Margaret Lindauer, Associate Professor and Coordinator of Museum Studies, Art History Holocaust survivor Dr. Yaffa Eliach collected over 6,000 photographs depicting residents of Eishyshok, a small Jewish settlement in Eastern Europe, taken between 1890 and 1941. Eliach survived the Nazi-led massacre in 1941 that killed nearly the entire Jewish population of Eishyshok. As a way to commemorate the destroyed town of her youth she began to collect photographs from other survivors and residents who fled Europe prior to the Holocaust. She subsequently selected 1,032 photographs from the Yaffa Eliach Shtetl Collection for display in The Tower of Faces, a permanent exhibition in The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, located in Washington, DC. The Tower of Faces is a multivalent exhibition. What the photographs represent has changed as time has passed and the collection has served multiple purposes. For Eliach, who has a personal connection to the collection and to events the images have come to represent, the exhibition is a monument within a memorial museum that specifically visually depicts and commemorates Eishyshok and its residents. Once the photographs were

10 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: The gallery's inaugural exhibition showcased the work of six artists, five of whom, Frank Lobdel, Craig Kauffman, Richard Diebenkorn, John Altoon and Clyfford Still were producing Abstract Expressionist paintings as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Expressionist painting. West Coast style. The gallery's inaugural exhibition showcased the work of six artists, five of whom, Frank Lobdel, Craig Kauffman, Richard Diebenkorn, John Altoon and Clyfford Still were producing Abstract

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the 1990s, art curators have increasingly adopted novel strategies of display of visual art that explores the subject of the Holocaust, including a movement away from images of Jewish victimisation towards more detached and "defamiliarising" representational attitudes as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Since the 1980s, art curators have increasingly adopted novel strategies of display of visual art that explores the subject of the Holocaust, including a movement away from images of Jewish victimisation towards more detached and ‘defamiliarising’ representational attitudes. This essay discusses this transition, suggesting that the changes in art display emerged alongside generational shifts and involved a re-evaluation of the representation of the Holocaust in the visual arts. This analysis focuses on a number of exhibitions and artworks displayed in art museums and galleries in the United States in the 1990s, exploring how the new curatorial paradigm challenged and, to a certain degree, altered the public perceptions of the role of art about the Holocaust.

4 citations