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Brian Edward Donovan

Bio: Brian Edward Donovan is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 84 citations.

Papers
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DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Guidelines handed down ad hoc by Congress are presented, and recommendations are made on how to proceed with the implementation of these guidelines.
Abstract: guidelines handed down ad hoc by Congress.

84 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the use of the Content.
Abstract: Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information (the “Content”) contained in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor & Francis, our agents, and our licensors make no representations or warranties whatsoever as to the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any purpose of the Content. Any opinions and views expressed in this publication are the opinions and views of the authors, and are not the views of or endorsed by Taylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon and should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the use of the Content.

1,038 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: After the events of September 11, 2001, I resigned myself to the fact that the lives of innocent men and women in the United States were under threat.
Abstract: ![Figure][1] By LTC Dave Grossman Published by Back Bay Books, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020, 1995. xxxiv + 366 p. Price $15.95 (paperback) After the events of September 11, 2001, I resigned myself to the fact that the lives of innocent men and women in the United States

359 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The notion of domesticity was introduced by as mentioned in this paper, who argued that a sphere is not a home: woman's larger place in the city at midcentury Conclusion Appendices Notes Sources and select bibliography Index.
Abstract: Preface Introduction: locating domesticity 1. Family, community, and the frontier generation, 1790-1820 2. Family in transition: the revival cycle, 1813-1838 3. The era of association: between family and society, 1825-1845 4. Privacy and the making of the self-made man: family strategies of the middle class at midcentury 5. A sphere is not a home: woman's larger place in the city at midcentury Conclusion Appendices Notes Sources and select bibliography Index.

357 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Leslie Hearnshaw responds strongly to those he sees as jeopardizing an ancient humanist project of psychological knowledge: over-specialized professional psychologists, historians indifferent to present scientific psychology, and critics of the whole progressivist enterprise.
Abstract: It is not uncommon for emeritus professors to take a more reflective view of their discipline, or even for them to grapple with the significance of their specialist knowledge for perennial human questions. Leslie Hearnshaw, for many years Professor of Psychology at Liverpool, is better equipped than many for this role, having already written a history of British psychology and the standard biography of Cyril Burt. In this book, he responds strongly to those he sees as jeopardizing an ancient humanist project of psychological knowledge: over-specialized professional psychologists, historians indifferent to present scientific psychology, and critics of the whole progressivist enterprise. The result is an extraordinarily wide-ranging study-very definitely a conscious act of unification-to portray \"psychology\" as a coherent and progressive endeavour, whatever its problematic qualities as science. His story begins with the animism of early cultures, and it runs through the Greeks to the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the grounding of modern psychology in biology, philosophy, and the German universities in the nineteenth century. There is a separate chapter on \"medical influences\", arguing that it is only with the generation ofJames and Ribot that there is any significant medical psychology. He also attempts to do justice to \"the social dimension\"; and few other histories of psychology have had the breadth to assimilate Marx or Parsons. With the twentieth century, Hearnshaw stresses clearly the \"shaping\" power of the occupational organization and application of psychology, as well as the theoretical and methodological issues which usually dominate such general accounts. In the final chapters, he shows that recent psychology has not been so specialized that it has avoided shaping by philosophical critiques, and he then boldly reviews \"the state of the art\", focusing on the neurosciences and the \"cognitive revolution\". In conclusion, he ventures his own candidate for a unifying \"metapsychology\", based on William Stern's \"personalism\". This is an extraordinary journey, and niggles about detail are out of place, though some passing judgments make one blench. Ultimately, I feel, the book is a declaration of faith. Certainly, it does not engage with the deep difficulties, philosophical and historical, of the enterprise; the key values of continuity, progress, and the striving intellect give the book its form and are not themselves the subject of reflection. As a result the material up till the twentieth century is much less interesting (and in my view less defensible) than what follows, since it becomes a …

327 citations