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Author

Brian Ireland

Bio: Brian Ireland is an academic researcher from University of New South Wales. The author has contributed to research in topics: Popular music & Youth culture. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 4 publications receiving 13 citations.
Topics: Popular music, Youth culture, Hippie, Orientalism

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the author explores the importance of On the Road to the British counter-culture and explains why it was such an influence on those who travelled east, arguing that Kerouac proposed a "beat" mode of travelling in which the "outer" journey was a catalyst for an "inner" journey of spiritual growth or enlightenment.
Abstract: The hippy trail was one of the last great expressions of alternative tourism. The trail to Lebanon, Morocco, Afghanistan, Nepal, India and other points east, flourished between 1957 (when Jack Kerouac published his influential road narrative On the Road) and 1978 (when the Iranian Revolution closed the land route from Europe to India). This essay explores the importance of On the Road to the British counter-culture and explains why it was such an influence on those who travelled east. We argue that Kerouac proposed a “beat” mode of travelling in which the “outer” journey was a catalyst for an “inner” journey of spiritual growth or enlightenment.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyse the development of a self-consciously "Eastern"-sounding music within Western pop music, and demonstrate that these developments added up to a "neo-orientalism": resembling the older, imperial orientalism in its tendency to simplify and romanticize the East, but different from it in the passionate sincerity of its admiration for certain Eastern forms, which were taken to the point of challenging dominant cultural and even political norms within the West.
Abstract: In this paper we analyse one particular interaction: the development of a self-consciously “Eastern”-sounding music within Western pop music. We understand this in the context of several “journeys to the East”: some virtual (the interest in oriental religions, the adoption of Eastern musical forms) and some real (the journeys taken to the East by some musicians and by thousands of young people). We will consider, first, the milieu within which these changes took place, and then analyse the methods, scale and motivations of those Western artists who took inspiration from Eastern, mainly Indian, music in the 1960s and 1970s to create what became known as “raga rock.” Our aim is to demonstrate that these developments added up to a “neo-orientalism”: resembling the older, imperial orientalism in its tendency to simplify and romanticize the East, but different from it in the passionate sincerity of its admiration for certain Eastern forms, which were taken to the point of challenging dominant cultural and even political norms within the West.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A proposal for an 'anti-nominian' approach to the study of youth cultures is proposed: researchers should be more sensitive to the constructed nature of the labels used to identify the various strands of youth identity.
Abstract: This paper analyses the attitudes expressed by consular and embassy officials to a new type of traveller they encountered in the mid-1960s. Their observations are contextualised within wider debates concerning 'youth' in the late 1950s and 1960s. Officials distinguished sharply between 'overlanders' (who could be tolerated or accommodated) and 'beatniks' whose behaviour was characterized as illegal and/or unacceptable. Smoking cannabis was identified as a key marker of beatnik behaviour. Officials' observations are contrasted with four accounts by new travellers from the period. The paper concludes with a proposal for an 'anti-nominian' approach to the study of youth cultures: researchers should be more sensitive to the constructed nature of the labels used to identify the various strands of youth identity.

3 citations

Book
10 Nov 2017

2 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Instrument of Desire as discussed by the authors, the authors present a wide-ranging exploration of the history of the electric guitar, focusing on key performers who have shaped the use and meaning of the instrument: Charlie Christian, Les Paul, Chet Atkins, Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, MC5, and Led Zeppelin.
Abstract: Around 1930, a group of guitar designers in southern California fitted instruments with an electromagnetic device called a pickup - and forever changed the face of popular music. taken up by musicians as diverse as Les Paul, Muddy Waters, Jimi Hendrix, and the MC5, the electric guitar would become not just a conduit of electrifying new sounds but also a symbol of energy, innovation, and desire in the music of the day. This volume is the first full account of the historical and cultural significance of the electric guitar, a wide-ranging exploration of how and why the instrument has had such broad musical and cultural impact. This book ranges across the history of the electric guitar by focusing on key performers who have shaped the use and meaning of the instrument: Charlie Christian, Les Paul, Chet Atkins, Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, the MC5, and Led Zeppelin. It traces two competing ideals for the sound of the instrument: one, focusing on tonal purity, has been favoured by musicians seeking to integrate the electric guitar into the existing conventions of pop music; the other, centering on timbral distortion, has been used to challenge popular notions of \"acceptable\" and \"unacceptable\" noise. \"Instrument of Desire\" reveals how these different approaches to sound also entail different ideas about the place of the body in musical performance, the ways in which music articulates racialized and gendered identities, and the position of popular music in American social and political life.

142 citations

Book
09 Apr 2020
TL;DR: The Beatles and Sixties Britain this paper explores how and why the band inspired phobia as well as mania in 1960s Britain, showing that the Fab Four became symbols of modernity in the early sixties, at once displaying the possibilities and establishing the limits of change.
Abstract: Though the Beatles are nowadays considered national treasures, this book shows how and why they inspired phobia as well as mania in 1960s Britain. As symbols of modernity in the early sixties, they functioned as a stress test for British institutions and identities, at once displaying the possibilities and establishing the limits of change. Later in the decade, they developed forms of living, loving, thinking, looking, creating, worshipping and campaigning which became subjects of intense controversy. The ambivalent attitudes contemporaries displayed towards the Beatles are not captured in hackneyed ideas of the 'swinging sixties', the 'permissive society' and the all-conquering 'Fab Four'. Drawing upon a wealth of contemporary sources, The Beatles and Sixties Britain offers a new understanding of the band as existing in creative tension with postwar British society: their disruptive presence inciting a wholesale re-examination of social, political and cultural norms.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Roshanak Kheshti's new book, Modernity's Ear: Listening to Race and Gender in World Music, takes an angle to a less familiar concept that, while hardly self-explanatory, lends itself very well to a...
Abstract: Roshanak Kheshti’s new book, Modernity’s Ear: Listening to Race and Gender in World Music, takes an angle to a less familiar concept that, while hardly self-explanatory, lends itself very well to a...

17 citations