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Brian Spooner

Bio: Brian Spooner is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Persian & Written language. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 12 citations.

Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The idea of a separate identity in dari and tojiki continues to have limited significance for native speakers as mentioned in this paper, despite the fact that they both emerged from the same political situation some two thousand five hundred years ago.
Abstract: Persian is an important language today in a number of countries of west, south and central Asia. Persian and farsi are, of course, in origin not different names. They both emerged from the same political situation some two thousand five hundred years ago. Apart from the colonial language policies of the past and local nationalistic sentiments today, the idea of a separate identity in dari and tojiki continues to have limited significance for native speakers. Decisions about language policy in Afghanistan, Iran and Tajikistan in particular, but also to some extent in the region in general are made in the shadow of the heritage of a millennium in which Persian was the principal, if not the only written language. Language became a matter for government policy in the 1930s. Keywords:Dari; Farsi; Iran; language policies; Persian; Tajiki

16 citations


Cited by
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated aspects of multilingualism on Facebook, in particular code selection/code switching by language users of Iranian descent in a Belgium, focusing on the distributional salience of the various languages used, their functional role in the interactional architecture of social media, and connections with the construction of a diasporic space characterized by fragmented/dislocated identities.
Abstract: The project investigates aspects of multilingualism on Facebook, in particular code selection/code switching by language users of Iranian descent in a Belgium. The focus is three-fold: (i) the distributional salience of the various languages used, (ii) their functional role in the interactional architecture of social media, (iii) the connections with the construction of a diasporic space characterized by fragmented/dislocated identities.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the role of translation in Iran's language policy and found that although official communication between Iranian authorities and citizens is a prototypical example of monolingualism and non-translation, voluntary translation happens between Persian and nonPersian speaking individuals, acting as a viable and cost-effective bottom-up alternative for the inclusion of non-Persian-speaking peoples, far more effective than an impractical, top-down language policy reform implicitly found in the "Persianization" claim.
Abstract: Against the background of language policy research on Iran, and drawing on insights from recent scholarship on the role of translation in language policy, this article calls into question the claim that “Persianization” of non-Persian peoples is the main element of language policy in Iran. In so doing, the article examines closely the role of translation as enacted in two legal instruments: the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Law of Parliamentary Elections. The study illustrates that although official communication between Iranian authorities and citizens is a prototypical example of monolingualism and non-translation, voluntary translation happens between Persian and non-Persian speaking individuals, acting as a viable and cost-effective bottom-up alternative for the inclusion of non-Persian speaking peoples, far more effective than an impractical, top-down language policy reform implicitly found in the “Persianization” claim.

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that realist social theory could help us better understand the interaction between social structure and human agency in the context of family language policy (FLP) research, arguing that home often becomes a site where dominant societal ideologies and discourses of structuring nature compete with individual views and agency, ultimately informing language behavior.
Abstract: In this article, I argue that one social theory that could help us better understand the interaction between social structure and human agency in the context of family language policy (FLP) research is realist social theory. FLP studies in multilingual contexts have shown that home often becomes a site where dominant societal ideologies and discourses of structuring nature compete with individual views and agency, ultimately informing language behavior. Realist social theory advocates the analytical separation of structure and agency and attributes causal powers to both social structures and individual agency. This conceptualization of structure and agency prevents us from falling into structural determinism or individual voluntarism. Through examining the linguistic ideologies and practices of thirteen mothers of young children in Tabriz, Iran, I illustrate how family language policy emerges in interaction with and response to structural powers. (Family language policy, realist social theory, Iranian Azerbaijanis, agency, social structures, language maintenance)

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the scope of this minority language provision in the television programs broadcasted by the state in Kurdistan and argue that the use of translation and bilingualism working alongside official monolingualism, calling into question the issue of Persianization.
Abstract: Although Persian is the official language in Iran, legal provisions are available for the use of minority languages in the media. Recent scholarship describes ‘Persianization’ as the ‘building block’ of language policy, overlooking the use of minority languages in official media. This paper examines the scope of this minority language provision in the television programs broadcasted by the state in Kurdistan. It illustrates the use of translation and bilingualism working alongside official monolingualism, calling into question the issue of Persianization. The article first describes the use of non-Persian languages in Iranian state media and shows their proportion vis-a-vis official Persian. Second, it examines the use of Kurdish and the weight of translation in the television programs under study. Advocating translational justice, the paper calls for a clear translation policy and more translation to be offered for programs broadcasted for Kurdish minorities to ensure equal access to media.

14 citations

DOI
03 Aug 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, a systematic study of Mīrzā Muḥammad Ḥasan Qatīl, an important Persian-writing Khatri poet and intellectual active in Lucknow between the end of the 18th and the first two decades of the 19th century, focusing on his ideas regarding the linguistic geography of Persian is presented.
Abstract: The paper deals with Mīrzā Muḥammad Ḥasan Qatīl, an important Persian-writing Khatri poet and intellectual active in Lucknow between the end of the 18th and the first two decades of the 19th century, focusing on his ideas regarding the linguistic geography of Persian. Qatīl dealt with the geographical varieties of Persian mainly in two texts, namely the Shajarat al-amānī and the Nahr alfaṣāḥat, but relevant observations are scattered in almost all of his works, including the doxographic Haft tamāshā. The analysis provided here, which is also the first systematic study on a particularly meaningful part of Qatīl’s socio-linguistic thought and one of the very few explorations of Qatīl’s work altogether, not only examines in detail his grammatical and rhetorical treatises, reading them on the vast background of Arabic-Persian philology, but discusses as well the interaction of Qatīl’s early conversion to Shi‘ite Islam with the author’s linguistic ideas, in a philological-historical perspective. Summary 1. Qatīl’s writings and the Persian language question. –2. Defining Persian in and around the Shajarat al-amānī. –3. Layered hegemonies in the Nahr al-faṣāḥat. –4. Qatīl’s conversion and the linguistic idea of Iran. –Primary sources. –Secondary sources.

10 citations