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Camille A. Jones

Bio: Camille A. Jones is an academic researcher from National Institutes of Health. The author has contributed to research in topics: Population & Kidney disease. The author has an hindex of 26, co-authored 34 publications receiving 5494 citations. Previous affiliations of Camille A. Jones include Case Western Reserve University & University of Arkansas.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Prevalence of kidney stone disease history in the United States population increased between 1980 and 1994 and a history of stone disease was strongly associated with race/ethnicity and region of residence.

1,268 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Elevated serum creatinine level, an indicator of chronic renal disease, is common and strongly related to inadequate treatment of high blood pressure.
Abstract: Background The prevalence and incidence of end-stage renal disease in the United States are increasing, but milder renal disease is much more common and may often go undiagnosed and undertreated. Methods A cross-sectional study of a representative sample of the US population was conducted using 16 589 adult participants aged 17 years and older in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) conducted from 1988 to 1994. An elevated serum creatinine level was defined as 141 µmol/L or higher (≥1.6 mg/dL) for men and 124 µmol/L or higher (≥1.4 mg/dL) for women (>99th percentile for healthy young adults) and was the main outcome measure. Results Higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, presence of hypertension, antihypertensive medication use, older age, and diabetes mellitus were all associated with higher serum creatinine levels. An estimated 3.0% (5.6 million) of the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population had elevated serum creatinine levels, 70% of whom were hypertensive. Among hypertensive individuals with an elevated serum creatinine level, 75% received treatment. However, only 11% of all individuals with hypertension had their blood pressure reduced to lower than 130/85 mm Hg (the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommendation for hypertensive individuals with renal disease); 27% had a blood pressure lower than 140/90 mm Hg. Treated hypertensive individuals with an elevated creatinine level had a mean blood pressure of 147/77 mm Hg, 48% of whom were prescribed one antihypertensive medication. Conclusion Elevated serum creatinine level, an indicator of chronic renal disease, is common and strongly related to inadequate treatment of high blood pressure.

595 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Mean serum creatinine values are higher in men, non-Hispanic blacks, and older persons and are lower in Mexican-Americans, and it is not clear to what extent the variability by sex, age, and age reflects normal physiological differences rather than the presence of kidney disease.

560 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Predictors of RRF loss were female gender, non-white race, prior history of diabetes, and time to follow-up, and use of a calcium channel blocker, all of which were independently associated with decreased risk ofRRF loss.
Abstract: Residual renal function (RRF) in end-stage renal disease is clinically important as it contributes to adequacy of dialysis, quality of life, and mortality. This study was conducted to determine the predictors of RRF loss in a national random sample of patients initiating hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. The study controlled for baseline variables and included major predictors. The end point was loss of RRF, defined as a urine volume <200 ml/24 h at approximately 1 yr of follow-up. The adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and P values associated with each of the demographic, clinical, laboratory, and treatment parameters were estimated using an "adjusted" univariate analysis. Significant variables (P < 0.05) were included in a multivariate logistic regression model. Predictors of RRF loss were female gender (AOR = 1.45; P < 0.001), non-white race (AOR = 1.57; P = <0.001), prior history of diabetes (AOR = 1.82; P = 0.006), prior history of congestive heart failure (AOR = 1.32; P = 0.03), and time to follow-up (AOR = 1.06 per month; P = 0.03). Patients treated with peritoneal dialysis had a 65% lower risk of RRF loss than those on hemodialysis (AOR = 0.35; P < 0.001). Higher serum calcium (AOR = 0.81 per mg/dl; P = 0.05), use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (AOR = 0.68; P < 0.001). and use of a calcium channel blocker (AOR = 0.77; P = 0.01) were independently associated with decreased risk of RRF loss. The observations of demographic groups at risk and potentially modifiable factors and therapies have generated testable hypotheses regarding therapies that may preserve RRF among end-stage renal disease patients.

545 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In adults aged 40+ years, after excluding persons with clinical proteinuria, albuminuria was independently associated with older age, non-Hispanic black and Mexican American ethnicity, diabetes, hypertension, and elevated serum creatinine concentration.

407 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In those older than age 50, systolic blood pressure of greater than 140 mm Hg is a more important cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor than diastolic BP, and hypertension will be controlled only if patients are motivated to stay on their treatment plan.
Abstract: The National High Blood Pressure Education Program presents the complete Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Like its predecessors, the purpose is to provide an evidence-based approach to the prevention and management of hypertension. The key messages of this report are these: in those older than age 50, systolic blood pressure (BP) of greater than 140 mm Hg is a more important cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor than diastolic BP; beginning at 115/75 mm Hg, CVD risk doubles for each increment of 20/10 mm Hg; those who are normotensive at 55 years of age will have a 90% lifetime risk of developing hypertension; prehypertensive individuals (systolic BP 120-139 mm Hg or diastolic BP 80-89 mm Hg) require health-promoting lifestyle modifications to prevent the progressive rise in blood pressure and CVD; for uncomplicated hypertension, thiazide diuretic should be used in drug treatment for most, either alone or combined with drugs from other classes; this report delineates specific high-risk conditions that are compelling indications for the use of other antihypertensive drug classes (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers); two or more antihypertensive medications will be required to achieve goal BP (<140/90 mm Hg, or <130/80 mm Hg) for patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease; for patients whose BP is more than 20 mm Hg above the systolic BP goal or more than 10 mm Hg above the diastolic BP goal, initiation of therapy using two agents, one of which usually will be a thiazide diuretic, should be considered; regardless of therapy or care, hypertension will be controlled only if patients are motivated to stay on their treatment plan. Positive experiences, trust in the clinician, and empathy improve patient motivation and satisfaction. This report serves as a guide, and the committee continues to recognize that the responsible physician's judgment remains paramount.

14,975 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In the early 1990s, the National Kidney Foundation (K/DOQI) developed a set of clinical practice guidelines to define chronic kidney disease and to classify stages in the progression of kidney disease.

10,265 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used the modified isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-traceable 4-variable modified modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for Japanese patients.

4,862 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors conducted a longitudinal study of mortality in 228,552 patients who were receiving long-term dialysis for end-stage renal disease, and 46,164 were placed on a waiting list for transplantation, 23,275 of whom received a first cadaveric transplant between 1991 and 1997.
Abstract: Background The extent to which renal allotransplantation — as compared with long-term dialysis — improves survival among patients with end-stage renal disease is controversial, because those selected for transplantation may have a lower base-line risk of death. Methods In an attempt to distinguish the effects of patient selection from those of transplantation itself, we conducted a longitudinal study of mortality in 228,552 patients who were receiving long-term dialysis for end-stage renal disease. Of these patients, 46,164 were placed on a waiting list for transplantation, 23,275 of whom received a first cadaveric transplant between 1991 and 1997. The relative risk of death and survival were assessed with time-dependent nonproportional-hazards analysis, with adjustment for age, race, sex, cause of end-stage renal disease, geographic region, time from first treatment for end-stage renal disease to placement on the waiting list, and year of initial placement on the list. Results Among the various subgroups...

4,442 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The goal is to disseminate the simple definition and five-stage classification system of Chronic kidney disease, to summarize the major recommendations on early detection of chronic kidney disease in adults, and to consider some of the issues associated with these recommendations.
Abstract: Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing incidence and prevalence, poor outcomes, and high cost. Outcomes of chronic kidney disease include not only kidney failure but also complications of decreased kidney function and cardiovascular disease. Current evidence suggests that some of these adverse outcomes can be prevented or delayed by early detection and treatment. Unfortunately, chronic kidney disease is underdiagnosed and undertreated, in part as a result of lack of agreement on a definition and classification of its stages of progression. Recent clinical practice guidelines by the National Kidney Foundation 1) define chronic kidney disease and classify its stages, regardless of underlying cause, 2) evaluate laboratory measurements for the clinical assessment of kidney disease, 3) associate the level of kidney function with complications of chronic kidney disease, and 4) stratify the risk for loss of kidney function and development of cardiovascular disease. The guidelines were developed by using an approach based on the procedure outlined by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. This paper presents the definition and five-stage classification system of chronic kidney disease and summarizes the major recommendations on early detection in adults. Recommendations include identifying persons at increased risk (those with diabetes, those with hypertension, those with a family history of chronic kidney disease, those older than 60 years of age, or those with U.S. racial or ethnic minority status), detecting kidney damage by measuring the albumin-creatinine ratio in untimed ("spot") urine specimens, and estimating the glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements by using prediction equations. Because of the high prevalence of early stages of chronic kidney disease in the general population (approximately 11% of adults), this information is particularly important for general internists and specialists.

4,363 citations