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Carla Gannis

Bio: Carla Gannis is an academic researcher from Pratt Institute. The author has contributed to research in topics: Digital art & The arts. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 12 citations.

Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 Jul 2018
TL;DR: This one-day Symposium explored themes of personhood, modernity and digital art, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology, artistic practice and society.
Abstract: This one-day Symposium explored themes of personhood, modernity and digital art, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology, artistic practice and society. It seeks a renewed consideration of the role of art in illuminating human identity in a positive relation with technology, and its transformative effects upon space and time. The concerns for the role of art amidst the forces of a post-modern world are influenced by important legacies of the past, by which ideas about human identity and difference have been made meaningful in the relation of history and technology. In the frequently transient and conflicting forces of humanness and forces of modernity, the digital world of the arts emerges as a means by which new ideas of space and time can be considered, with new perspectives of human identity seen as states of being, towards the possibilities of experience, technology, individuality and society.

13 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter focuses on the work and life of digital artist Carla Gannis, and explores the evolution of her artistic expression from painting to digital art, a story that ties broadly to the development of the digital arts field from the 1990s to present.
Abstract: This chapter focuses on the work and life of digital artist Carla Gannis. Originally from North Carolina, Gannis received a BFA from UNC Greensboro, and an MFA in painting from Boston University. In 2005 she was awarded a New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Grant in Computer Arts, and since then, she lives and works in Brooklyn, where she is a professor and assistant chairperson of The Department of Digital Arts at Pratt Institute. Conveying her journey from painter to digital artist and storyteller, we explore the evolution of her artistic expression from painting to digital art, a story that ties broadly to the development of the digital arts field from the 1990s to present. Presented both through images of her work, and by way of a face to face unrehearsed interview, this chapter touches upon many of the highly pertinent topics impacting artists and museums in the 21st-century digital age. Among these, of special interest to museums are her observations on audiences, and how working in digital media affords new opportunities and multiple ways of connecting to the viewer, and reaching vast numbers of people across the globe, traveling from the gallery to the public square, in particular, Times Square and the Internet, showing that the life of a digital work can have multiple states of being. Gannis emphasizes the cultural positioning of digital spaces in physical places where diverse large public audiences can experience the work and where the artist can feel the pulse of public reaction and interaction. A feature of her work is her expression of self and gender through digital manifestations of persona, being and social consciousness, that take very original shapes and forms, images, colors and animations that merge into digital interpretations of self and the surrounding world revealing her creative imagination and sense of poetry used to convey new narratives embedded in her work and life (Fig. 19.1). Open image in new window Fig. 19.1 Until the end of the world by Carla Gannis, her solo exhibition at the DAM gallery, Berlin, Germany, November 2017, installation view. (Photograph by Carla Gannis, http://carlagannis.com/blog/prints/until-the-end-of-the-world/)

Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter looks at the relationship between external digital life of museum goers with the internal museum environment aligned more with the pre-digital world than with contemporary culture.
Abstract: The distinguishing characteristic of digitalism is its focus on human behavior in cultural and social contexts. When we think of the developments of computer science and “information theory” that spawned the digital revolution, the focus generally defaults to digital tools and technology, as opposed to its effects on human life and culture and how advances in computing, digital communications and technology are transforming our ways of doing, seeing, knowing, learning, living and loving, to name a few examples. The impact of digitalism is all encompassing, touching all disciplines and human pursuits. How will museums change and transform themselves to connect in authentic ways with their communities while remaining relevant in a world transformed by digital culture that is moving full speed ahead, advancing in a state of constant change and development? While museums have been cautious and relatively slow to challenge traditional ways, they are surely noticing that we are reaching a digital tipping point of sorts that demands digital thinking and strategy to keep pace with evolving states of digital being, aesthetics, seeing and identity in world where everyone is connected to an all-encompassing digital ecosystem of shared networks and platforms. Although museums might argue that this shift to digital culture steeped in a user-centric model might be a costly one, not moving in this direction with a sense of timeliness becomes a far riskier strategy, being one that lacks consonance with museum audiences, and is out of synch with contemporary and digital life. This chapter looks at the relationship between external digital life of museum goers with the internal museum environment aligned more with the pre-digital world than with contemporary culture. How will museums recalibrate the gap between the visitors’ digital self and the museums physical identity? And, how will they revision the gallery experience for visitor learning, interaction, and participation? Will museums proceed fearlessly into digital life and art, embracing change, and the digital aesthetics and social milieu of the 21st century?

9 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2017
TL;DR: Digital Futures (Papadimitriou 2016) is a mobile and open platform for displaying and discussing work by researchers, artists, designers, companies and other professionals working with art, technology, design, science and beyond.
Abstract: Digital Futures (Papadimitriou 2016) is a mobile and open platform for displaying and discussing work by researchers, artists, designers, companies and other professionals working with art, technology, design, science and beyond. The programme started at the V&A in 2012 in order to enable collaboration and exchange, but also to create a flexible space to share artistic processes, academic research and engage with art, design, technology and contemporary issues. Bringing together people from different backgrounds and disciplines has been a central part to the programme. Digital Futures is not fixed to a place; instead, it is an open and mobile platform that changes continuously depending on participants, partners, themes and more, and exploring ideas from different perspectives.

6 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter discusses possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment.
Abstract: We discuss possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves. Successful museums must be very adaptable to the changing nature of public expectations. Some of the important aspects to be considered have been covered in earlier chapters in this book. Here we take this knowledge and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment, in what will rapidly become a postdigital world. The chapter summarizes the prospective directions for museums and related institutions in the context of changes in the digital landscape of the rest of society.

6 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter explores how education for museum professionals is transforming, as it responds to the need for graduates to possess digital skills and a deep knowledge and understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which museums are evolving.
Abstract: As the digital revolution accelerates, one of the most significant impacts that museums are experiencing, is how digital development is changing the very nature of work across the professions and disciplines from art and humanities to computer science and technology. Simply put—work and life are merging and becoming increasingly digital and cross-disciplinary, as they are absorbed into the digital ecosystem. Museums are recognizing that the digital shift is causing them to re-think the skills and knowledge their professional staff needs and are challenged to find effective strategies to respond to changes brought about by digital culture and related social and cultural issues, while graduate education for museum professionals is similarly challenged. As a case study, we consider Pratt Institute’s Master of Science in Museums and Digital Culture, introduced in 2015 by Giannini. Representing the first master’s degree of its kind, it offers a program set in a digital framework that encompasses the full range of museum activities and functions in contrast to the prevalent museum studies model taking a more traditional collection-centered approach. Over the past few years, the work of museum professionals behind the scenes has become increasingly carried out using digital tools and technologies, from collection management including digitization and access, to museum websites and social media, while using digital in galleries and exhibitions is an emerging area of critical focus aimed at developing digital strategies and methods for visitor engagement and experience and that expand the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals. Among digital advances, augmented and virtual reality, digital storytelling and artificial intelligence, are entering the mainstream of museum life, more fully immersing museums in the digital culture ecosystem. This chapter explores how education for museum professionals is transforming, as it responds to the need for graduates to possess digital skills and a deep knowledge and understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which museums are evolving.

4 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2019
TL;DR: These trends are traced, illustrating them using recent examples of art and activism at museums in New York and London, and strategies for museums to collaborate with their community and find common ground are explored.
Abstract: Once quiet places protected by walls, museums are increasingly besieged by activist groups. Spurred by social and political causes, they storm the gates bypassing the gatekeepers, to deliver their message and insist that museums become relevant, participatory and interactive, and give voice to their communities and audience. With no place to hide in a sea of digital connections, museums are challenged to find new directions and strategies for the post-digital world. This paper traces these trends, illustrating them using recent examples of art and activism at museums in New York and London, and explores strategies for museums to collaborate with their community and find common ground.

4 citations